Women With Children Needed as Health Focus Group Volunteers

-Information and flyer courtesy NC Cooperative Extension – Warren County Center

The Warren County Cooperative Extension Office is looking for local women with children to participate in a volunteer focus group on Wednesday, February 13, 2019, from 6 to 7 p.m.

Participants will provide the Poe Center, a health education organization, with feedback related to nutrition and physical activity in the community. Feedback provided will help prepare programs and health messages for Warren County.

The focus group will be held at the Warren County Cooperative Extension Office located at 158 Rafters Lane in Warrenton, NC.

Participants will receive a water bottle, tote bag, cooking magazine and magnet.

 

Kerr-Tar Area Agency on Aging to Host Dementia Education Conference

-Press Release, Kerr-Tar Regional Council of Governments

The Kerr-Tar Area Agency on Aging (AAA) and Dementia Alliance of North Carolina will host a Dementia Education Conference on Tuesday, August 7 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Check-in begins at 8 a.m. The event will take place at the Vance-Granville Civic Center, 200 Community College Road, Henderson.

The event is open to the public including caregivers, students, local leaders and aging professionals. The cost includes $10 for caregivers and $40 for Aging and Health Professionals. Register online at www.dementianc.org/henderson. Deadline to register is Tuesday, July 31.

Conference topics include Aging and Memory: What’s Normal and What’s Not, Redefining Technology for Caregivers, Adjusting Activities as Dementia Progresses and more! Breakfast and lunch will be provided, courtesy of Chef Christian Brown with Lake Gastronomy Catering.

Contact Harvey Holmes, Family Caregiver Specialist, with any questions or concerns at 252-436-2040 or [email protected]

Letters of Interest Are Due May 1, 2018

— press release

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation Offers Grant Opportunities for Health Programs

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation is seeking partners to help measurably improve health in Vance, Warren, Franklin, and Granville counties. The 2018 grant cycle is now open. Letters of Interest are due May 1.

To be considered for a grant with Triangle North Healthcare Foundation, you must represent a nonprofit organization, school, or governmental agency that serves the Triangle North region— Warren, Vance, Granville, and/or Franklin counties, according to the Foundation’s executive director Val Short. “Your project should fall into one of our five funding priorities, which are Chronic Disease, Mental Health & Substance Abuse, Nutrition & Physical Fitness, Success in School as related to Health & Fitness, and finally, Reproductive Health,” said Short.

The first step in the grant application process is the Letter of Interest, which is actually a form, available on the online Grant Portal, and accessed via the Foundation’s website, www.tnhfoundation.org.

“We ask that anyone interested in applying for a grant should contact us first to schedule a meeting,” said Short. “We can discuss the details of a project and determine if it falls within our funding guidelines.” To schedule a meeting to discuss a potential grant project, call 252-598-0763.

Since its first grant cycle in 2013, Triangle North Healthcare Foundation has awarded over $1 million in grants to a variety of programs and projects throughout the region, including the Henderson YMCA’s Save Our Kids and Girls on the Run programs, Boys & Girls Clubs’ healthy teen programs, N.C. MedAssist’s free pharmacy for the uninsured, Smart Start, and many others. A full listing of TNHF grant programs is available on the Foundation’s website.

The mission of the Foundation is “to encourage, support, and invest in quality efforts that measurably improve health in the Triangle North region.” The Foundation cannot accomplish this alone. “Through our partnerships with community organizations, formed through grantmaking, this Foundation can make a difference in the health status of our communities,” said Mrs. Short. “Please let us hear from you!” she added.

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation is a nonprofit regional grantmaking organization based in Henderson, NC, which supports and invests in health and wellness initiatives and programs that will impact health in a positive way in Warren, Vance, Granville, and Franklin counties. Funding for the Foundation’s grantmaking was made possible by the endowment established after the merge of Maria Parham Medical Center and Duke Lifepoint.

Is It Time for a Colonoscopy?

The following is re-published with permission from Maria Parham Health.  It is offered as news in the public interest.  It is not a paid advertisement.  This is not medical advice.  If you would like to view the original story on the MPH web page, please click here.

Do you remember when you used to put on your favorite bell bottoms and disco dance the night away? If you do, then it’s probably time to think about a routine colonoscopy screening. According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women, excluding skin cancers. And the vast majority of these cases occur in people 50 and older.

The good news is that the overall incidence of, and death rates associated with, colorectal cancers have been on the decline for more than a decade, thanks in large part to effective colonoscopy screenings that can detect the disease in its early stages.

“Colonoscopies are so important because they can improve our ability to detect colorectal cancer quickly and early, making the disease much more easily treatable” says Dr. Mark Dubinski, Gastroenterologist at Maria Parham Health. “Colonoscopies can also help us identify and remove colorectal polyps before they even become cancerous. The benefits are enormous.”

What are the symptoms?

Colorectal cancer often has no symptoms in its early stages – another reason that screenings are so important. Still, you should see your doctor if you have any of these warning signs:

Bleeding from the rectum;

Blood in the stool or in the toilet after a bowel movement;

Change in your bowel habits, including diarrhea or constipation or a change in the consistency of your stool;

Persistent cramping or discomfort in the lower abdomen;

An urge to have a bowel movement when the bowel is empty;

Constipation or diarrhea that lasts for more than a few days;

Decreased appetite;

Nausea or vomiting; and

Unintentional weight loss.

While these symptoms can also be indicative of other health conditions, your doctor can help you get to the root of the issue and determine the underlying cause.

How can I help prevent it?

Colonoscopy screenings are the number one way you can reduce your risk of colorectal cancer since the screenings can help detect the disease early or find polyps before they become cancerous. While the vast majority of new cases occur at age 50 and over, the disease does not discriminate and can happen to men and women at any age.

“We recommend that everyone talk to their doctor about their colorectal cancer risks and discuss when a colonoscopy could be right for them,” Dubinski says.

You can also be proactive in prevention in other ways. Living a healthy lifestyle that includes daily exercise, a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, limiting your alcohol intake and eliminating smoking can reduce your risk for colorectal and many other forms of cancer. Knowing your family’s medical history is also important – a history of the disease in your immediate family puts you at a higher risk for the disease.

Contact 800.424.DOCS (3627) to find a physician and take the next steps to schedule your colonoscopy today.

SIDEBAR: What to Expect During a Colonoscopy
Colonoscopies are an easier procedure than many realize. Shortly before the procedure, you will likely be given pain medication and a sedative to minimize discomfort. During the approximately 30-minute procedure, any polyps found will be removed by the doctor and tissue samples will be sent for a biopsy.

Keep in mind that you will be instructed to follow a special diet the day before your procedure and will need to have someone available to take you home afterward.

— courtesy MPH

(MPH is an advertising client of WIZS.  This is not a paid advertisement.)

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation’s 2018 Grant Cycle opens March 15

— press release

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation is seeking partners to help measurably improve health in Vance, Warren, Franklin, and Granville counties, with the opening of the grant funder’s sixth grant cycle on March 15, 2018.

To be considered for a grant with Triangle North Healthcare Foundation, you must represent a nonprofit organization, school, or governmental agency that serves the Triangle North region— Warren, Vance, Granville, and/or Franklin counties, according to the Foundation’s executive director Val Short. “Your project should fall into one of our five funding priorities, which are Chronic Disease, Mental Health & Substance Abuse, Nutrition & Physical Fitness, Success in School as related to Health & Fitness, and finally, Reproductive Health,” said Short.

The first step in the grant application process is the Letter of Interest, which will be due May 1st. The Letter of Interest form is available on the online Grant Portal, which can be accessed via the Foundation’s website, www.tnhfoundation.org “We strongly suggest that anyone interested in applying for a grant should contact us first to request a meeting,” said Short. “We can discuss the details of a project and determine if it falls within our funding guidelines.” To schedule a meeting to discuss a potential grant project, call 252-598-0763.

Since its first grant cycle in 2013, Triangle North Healthcare Foundation has awarded over $1 million in grants to a variety of programs and projects throughout the region, including the Henderson YMCA’s Save Our Kids and Girls on the Run programs, Boys & Girls Clubs’ healthy teen programs, N.C. MedAssist’s free pharmacy for the uninsured, Smart Start, and many others. A full listing of TNHF grant programs is available on the Foundation’s website.

The mission of the Foundation is “to encourage, support, and invest in quality efforts that measurably improve health in the Triangle North region.” The Foundation cannot accomplish this alone. “Through our partnerships with community organizations, formed through grantmaking, this Foundation can make a difference in the health status of our communities,” said Mrs. Short. “Please let us hear from you!” she added.

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation is a nonprofit regional grantmaking organization based in Henderson, NC, which supports and invests in health and wellness initiatives and programs that will impact health in a positive way in Warren, Vance, Granville, and Franklin counties. Funding for the Foundation’s grantmaking was made possible by the endowment established after the merge of Maria Parham Medical Center and Duke Lifepoint.

Researcher explores “Your Brain on Its Own” in VGCC lecture

— courtesy VGCC

To deal with change, manage stress and gain insight into making good decisions, it’s best to understand yourself and how your brain works, neuroscience researcher Phil Dixon shared with an audience at Vance-Granville Community College on Feb. 27, for his second of three sessions on “Using Your Brain for a Change.”

“In all of these situations, if you don’t understand yourself, you’re not going to be able to understand others,” Dixon said. A resident of Oxford, N.C., who is originally from England, Dixon has worked in a variety of industries around the world, including a time with Apple. His passion for neuroscience led to the series of lectures that are being sponsored by VGCC’s Office of the Endowment. The first was held in January, and he’ll conclude with a session later this month.

In the February session, “Your Brain on Its Own,” Dixon focused on various profiles, tendencies, influences and contexts that help persons understand who they are and how they are likely to react. His research about the brain is driven by a desire to help individuals become better leaders and make better decisions in their daily lives.

Dixon explored a variety of “profiles” designed to help individuals better understand themselves. The “Five Ps” profile, for example, reveals that we are all different. “What is a threat to one person may not be a threat to another,” Dixon noted.

“Character Profile,” meanwhile, begins with distinguishing individuals by whether they have an “ask” or a “tell” orientation. “To what degree do you tell people what to do, versus asking people what should be done?” he asked. From that vantage point, individuals are seen in one of four categories: Analytical (being correct vs. wrong), Driver (wanting results vs. fearing failure), Amiable (valuing relationships vs. fearing rejection) and Expressive (feeling exhilaration vs. a fear of not being good enough).

Meanwhile, knowing your tendencies — biases, habits, patterns of behavior, the triggers that may cause reactions, and paradigms — will help you better understand how to maintain your focus, Dixon explained.

He also noted the importance of understanding those things that have an influence on your life — beliefs, values, familiarity, memories, available choices, intelligence, etc. — and the context in which you view the world — your personal experiences, life cycles and recent events. “Your genetics make a difference,” he added. “The current data says that your genetics give you about 40 percent of your character.”

In discussing the dynamics of how the brain reacts to change, Dixon explored the learning process required should a person decide to go through a change — feasibility, appeal, agreeableness, resistance to change, readiness to change, and the celebration of small successes, among other points.

He recalled the character, “Yoda,” from the “Star Wars” movies, who said, “Do. Or do not. There is no try.” Dixon noted, “When we say that I’ll ‘try’ and do that, what happens in your brain? You set yourself up with an excuse. I only said I’ll try and do it. I didn’t say I’d do it.”

Dixon also explored strategies for dealing with stress, ways to prevent stress and how important it is to get enough sleep and maintain positivity in your life.

Decision making, he said, needs to be carefully planned. Making decisions is only sometimes logical, rational, conscious and data-based, he said. It’s often based on emotion and is nonconscious and irrational, clouded by tendencies such as bias, habits and patterns.

“To make good decisions, understand yourself. Be aware of what your tendencies are around decision making,” he offered. “Prepare the process of making decision before you have to make decisions.” For many people, the time of day for deciding is paramount. “If you have tough decisions to make, make them in the morning,” he said.

The best insights come when you are at your freshest, he said. “When do you have your best ideas?” he asked. “The conditions for having insight tend to be when you are relaxed, first thing in the morning, when you are jogging, when you are in the shower, when you are doing something repetitive that doesn’t require your pre-frontal cortex to be taking control, and when you’re not too happy. If you are only happy, those signals override it. When you are slightly reflective, slightly far away and when you are not thinking about the problem, those are the times you are likely to have your biggest insights.”

The concluding session in Dixon’s series, “Your Brain with Another Person,” scheduled for Tues., March 27, will explore bias and the nonconscious brain, communication, coaching, influencing and negotiating, encouraging innovation in others and helping others change. The lecture is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. to noon, in the small auditorium in Building 2 on VGCC’s Main Campus in Vance County. The public is invited. For more information, contact VGCC Endowment Director Eddie Ferguson at (252) 738-3264 or [email protected].

–VGCC–

VGCC guest speaker starts series on the brain

— courtesy VGCC

Phil Dixon is passionate about the human brain, and he communicated his passion in a fascinating Jan. 30 discussion that kicked off a series of three lectures hosted by Vance-Granville Community College, entitled “Using Your Brain for a Change.”

Originally from England, Dixon has lived in Oxford, N.C., for less than a year. His work history has spanned many different industries and parts of the world, including a stint at Apple.

Today, though, Dixon spends much of his time reading the latest research about neuroscience and determining how that research can be translated into practical application in our daily lives. In particular, Dixon is deeply involved in the application of neuroscience to leadership and management issues.

He said the reason that he and others focus on the brain is simple. “Everything we think, do and dream starts right between your ears, so I think it’s pretty important to take a look at what’s going on there,” Dixon said. Beyond that, he recalled that, years ago, he noticed the abundance of books and articles being published by supposed experts on the subject of leadership. “And yet, with all that available, we didn’t seem to be producing any better leaders,” Dixon said. “In fact, we seemed to be producing leaders who were getting worse. I wondered why. I studied and realized that if we can better understand the brain, maybe we can be better leaders.”

Dixon began his interactive presentation by giving the audience an outline of the brain’s structure, which can be divided not only into two halves but also into three “layers.”

“The first layer, going from bottom to top, is what is sometimes called the ‘lizard brain,’ which is the activator for the fight-or-flight response,” Dixon explained. “It’s pretty much on autopilot. It keeps you breathing.” Second is the “mammalian brain” or the “limbic system.” “This layer is responsible for managing your emotions, memories, biases and habits, and is the activator of decision-making,” he said. “Finally there is the neocortex, which is responsible for those things we typically describe as what make us human: language, imagination, consciousness and reasoning.”

Dixon said that each of the brain’s approximately 86 billion neurons is connected to thousands of other neurons. “We used to think the brain looked like a computer, but now we think it looks more like the Internet, with everything connected to everything else,” he said. “Your brain continues to change, and make new connections, throughout your life. Its ‘neuroplasticity,’ its ability to change, is huge.”

The human brain is constantly “scanning” the environment, Dixon explained, picking up on cues that indicate potential threats and potential rewards. “Of all the ‘circuitry’ in the brain, we have five times as many circuits in the brain to pick up threats as we do to pick up rewards,” he said.

He described the brain’s reactions with the “Five P’s”: Protection, Participation, Prediction, Purpose and Pleasure. “What people want is to feel physically and emotionally safe, we want to feel part of the group, and to be able to predict or have control over our environment,” Dixon said. “If those are taken care of, we feel safe. Then, we are able to find out what our purpose is in life, and we can enjoy the pleasures of life.”

Dixon said he was “blown away” when he learned that researchers discovered that the brain treats an emotional threat in the exact same way as a physical threat. “If I diss or reject someone or shout at them, to the brain, it’s exactly the same as if I slapped them around,” he noted.

Chemically, Dixon said, when a human feels threatened, the brain releases cortisol, the so-called “stress hormone.” The bad news is that the cortisol “hangs around” in the brain for between two and five hours after the threat. “So in most work or learning environments, you really don’t want to put someone’s brain into a threat state if you can possibly avoid it, because cortisol practically shuts down someone’s ability to plan and organize, initiate and learn,” Dixon argued.

One thing that puts the brain into a “threat state,” he explained, is change. “We are in a “VUCA” environment today: volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity,” he said. “The brain likes to be able to predict things.”

Dixon’s series continues on Tuesday, Feb. 27, with “Your Brain on its Own,” focusing on how the brain operates when people are alone, including how they focus, make decisions and manage stress and time. The lecture is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. to noon, in the small auditorium in Building 2 on VGCC’s Main Campus in Vance County. The public is invited.

The series concludes with “Your Brain with Another Person” on Tuesday, March 27. Dixon’s lectures are presented by VGCC’s Office of the Endowment. For more information, call Endowment Director Eddie Ferguson at (252) 738-3264.

–VGCC–

Maria Parham Health Implementing New Visitor Restrictions during Flu Season

— Press Release from Maria Parham Health

Maria Parham Health Implementing New Visitor Restrictions during Flu Season

Henderson, NC (January 12, 2018) – Our primary goal at Maria Parham Health is to provide the best quality of care in an environment that is safe for our patients. To protect them, at times we must manage their exposure to illnesses that are easily spread, like the flu.

We carefully monitor flu activity levels in our hospitals and the community. When certain thresholds are met, we must take action to halt the spread and limit the number of visitors allowed in our patient areas. Due to the high numbers of respiratory illness and influenza, Maria Parham Health has implemented visitor restrictions.

If you are visiting our hospital during flu season, please be prepared for the possibility of limited visitation and safety hygiene requests to be made.

Visitors are limited to immediate family members or designated adult caregivers, who have no fever, cough, or other flu-like symptoms.

Children under the age of 12 are not permitted to visit unless for a medical appointment or an ED visit.

All persons with flu symptoms (cough, fever, runny nose, sore throat, vomiting, extreme tiredness, muscle aches and or diarrhea), please do not visit patients.

Visitors are asked to wash hands frequently. Foam hand cleanser is available throughout the building.

If you are here for services and have flu symptoms, please ask for a mask upon arrival.

You may see some of our staff wearing masks as a safety precaution for our patients.

To help prevent the spread of flu germs outside of the hospital, please wash your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol hand gel and encourage others to do so as well.

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Maria Parham Health welcomes Dr. Aidevo Igbide

The following is a press release from Maria Parham Health, not a paid advertisement.

Henderson, NC – Maria Parham Health (MPH), a Duke LifePoint hospital, is excited to announce that Aidevo S. Igbide, MD has joined their primary care physician practice, Maria Parham Primary Care. Dr. Igbide joins our community from Surrey, BC, Canada where she practiced family medicine. Dr. Igbide has over 17 years of experience as a doctor and has worked in multiple countries throughout the world.

Dr. Igbide earned her medical degree from the University of Benin, School of Medicine in Benin City, Nigeria. She completed a residency program at London Deanery, Sidcup Training in Family Medicine and also trained in internal medicine at the Queens hospital, London Deanery both located in London England. Dr. Igbide holds several licensures including North Carolina  medical Board and College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia. She previously held a teaching license with the Washington State Medical Board. She is also certified through multiple organizations and societies including, Board certification by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. She is a Member Royal College of General Practitioners (MRCGP), United Kingdom and a Member Royal College of Physicians (MRCP), United Kingdom. She is ECFMG certified and board eligible with the American Board of Family Physicians (ABFM).

Dr. Igbide holds several active professional memberships in the following organizations, Canada Medical Protection association, College of Family Physicians of Canada, Canadian Medical Association and the General Medical Council of the United Kingdom. When she is not working, Dr. Igbide enjoys swimming, aerobics and Zumba dancing, cooking and traveling. She is also a soprano soloist and enjoys taking time to practice her skill.

Maria Parham Primary Care is located in the Vance Medical Arts Building across from Maria Parham Health. This practice offers primary care services for the entire family including preventative care, annual wellness care, childhood illness, well child care, women’s health, treatment of chronic illness and geriatric care. Dr. Igbide joins Dr. Gary Smith and Dr. Kavitha Subramanian at Maria Parham Primary Care.

Dr. Igbide is now accepting patients at Maria Parham Primary Care located at 511 Ruin Creek Rd, Suite 101 in Henderson. To reach Maria Parham Primary Care, please call 252.436.0040 appointments can also be made online by visiting mariaparham.com.

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(Maria Parham Health is an advertising client of WIZS.  This is not a paid advertisement.)

Black Ice, Wind Chills the New Concerns Jan 4-6

(Click here for the latest briefing from the NWS.)

From the National Weather Service, a winter weather advisory remains in effect for the WIZS area of Vance, Granville, Warren and Franklin Counties until 7 a.m. Saturday for icy roads, black ice, hazardous travel conditions and dangerous wind chill values.

A winter weather advisory for black ice means dangerous travel from unseen ice as well as compacted snow on the road.  You are urged to be cautious while traveling both during the day and at night because high temperatures are not suppose to be above freezing through the period, with overnight lows in the single digits and wind chill values at or below zero at times.

Exposure to these wind chills can cause frostbit in as little as 30 minutes and could lead to the beginning stages of hypothermia.  Animals can be negatively affected as well.