COVID-19 Scam Alert

Notice to Public: Beware of Scams Involving COVID-19 Contact Tracing

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-Information courtesy the NCDHHS 

The public is asked to be aware that scams involving COVID-19 contact tracing are being used to gain financial and sensitive information.

According to the NCDHHS, legitimate contact tracers from the COVID-19 Community Team will contact those who have tested positive or those who have been near someone with COVID-19 by text from the number 45394 or email from NC-ARIAS-NoReply@dhhs.nc.gov. Avoid responding to unknown calls or emails.

If the Community Team reaches out with a phone call, either NC OUTREACH or the local health department’s number will appear on their phone.

If a member of the Team calls and doesn’t get an answer, they will leave a voicemail. To protect your privacy, the voicemail will not say that the call is about COVID-19.

The NCDHHS website explains that callers will know it is a member of the Community Team calling because they will do the following when leaving a voicemail:

  • Identify themselves with their first name and the local health department they are calling from.
  • Say “We are contacting you about an urgent public health matter. We would like to speak with you to provide further information and share guidance.”
  • Request that you call your local health department at your earliest convenience and will tell you the local health department’s phone number.
  • Tell you the local health department’s website in case you would like to go to the website to verify the phone number.

Additionally, if you are ever in doubt about how to contact your local health department, please use this website for local health department contact information (click here).

Four-County Health Departments:

Vance: 115 Charles Rollins Rd, Henderson, NC 27536; (252) 492-7915

Granville: 101 Hunt Dr, Oxford, NC 27565; (919) 693-2141

Franklin: 107 Industrial Dr, Louisburg, NC 27549; (919) 496-2533

Warren: 544 West Ridgeway St, Warrenton, NC 27589; (252) 257-1185

Granville Vance Public Health Logo

Local COVID-19 Update: Increase in Total Cases, Related Deaths

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-Information courtesy Granville Vance Public Health and the Warren County Health Department

As of June 24, 2020, there are 773 known COVID-19 cases in Granville County, 483 cases in Vance County, 155 cases in Warren County and 56,174 confirmed cases in North Carolina.

Granville County:

There are three outbreaks at congregate living facilities in Granville County: Federal Correctional Complex in Butner, NC, Murdoch Development Center in Butner, NC, and Central Regional Hospital in Butner, NC.

Of the cases in Granville County, 402 are associated with the prisons, five are associated with Murdoch, and two are associated with Central Regional Hospital.

Of the 402 cases in the prison system, 89 have been released from isolation and two individuals with Murdoch have been released from isolation.

Of the 364 community-based cases in Granville County, 196 have been released from isolation and four are hospitalized.

There have been a total of 19 deaths in Granville County, 17 of whom were with the Bureau of Prisons and one with Central Regional Hospital.

Vance County:

There are two active outbreaks at congregate living facilities in Vance County: Kerr Lake Nursing Home in Henderson, NC, and Senior Citizens Home in Henderson, NC.

There was also an outbreak at Pelican Health in Henderson, NC that is no longer active.

Of the cases in Vance County, 111 are associated with outbreaks at congregate living facilities including 43 cases associated with Kerr Lake Nursing Home and 10 associated with Senior Citizens Home.

Of the 111 cases in congregate living facilities in Vance County, 42 have been released from isolation.

Of the 372 community-based cases in Vance County, 171 have been released from isolation.

Ten individuals in Vance County are hospitalized.

There have been a total of 36 deaths in Vance County, 14 of whom were associated with Pelican Health and 10 of whom were associated with Kerr Lake Nursing Home.

Warren County:

There are 155 confirmed positive COVID-19 cases with no known results currently pending. Of the known positive cases, 127 are considered recovered.

One individual in Warren County is hospitalized.

There have been a total of five deaths in Warren County.

Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina DHHS Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen announced on Wednesday that North Carolina will remain in Safer at Home Phase 2 for at least three more weeks – until July 17, 2020.

Governor Cooper also announced that face coverings must be worn when people are in public places as officials seek to stabilize concerning trends of increasing viral spread. Growing evidence shows that cloth face coverings, when worn consistently, can decrease the spread of COVID-19, especially among people who are not yet showing symptoms of the virus.

For more information about the extension of Phase 2 and these new measures, see the NC Staying Ahead of the Curve web page (click here)

GVPH updates its website daily at approximately 5 p.m. with Vance and Granville COVID-19 statistics. Please visit www.gvph.org/COVID-19/ for the latest information.

GVPH also emails updates about COVID-19 in Granville and Vance counties each evening. You can sign up to receive these emails at www.gvph.org/covid-19.

Granville Vance Public Health Logo

Local COVID-19 Update: Vance, Granville & Warren County Report

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-Information courtesy Granville Vance Public Health and Warren County Health Department

As of June 2, 2020, there are 324 known COVID-19 cases in Granville County, 332 cases in Vance County, 66 cases in Warren County and 29,889 confirmed cases in North Carolina.

There are four outbreaks at congregate living facilities in the district – one at Federal Correctional Complex in Butner, NC; one at Murdoch Development Center in Butner, NC; one at Pelican Health in Henderson, NC; and one at Kerr Lake Nursing Home in Henderson, NC.

Of the total positive cases in each county, 142 in Granville County are associated with the prisons, 5 are associated with Murdoch, 58 in Vance County are associated with Pelican Health nursing home, and 32 are associated with Kerr Lake Nursing Home.

Of the 177 community-based cases in Granville County, 87 have been released from isolation and 4 are hospitalized.

Of the 142 cases in the prison system, 70 have been released from isolation.

Of the 242 community-based cases in Vance County, 120 have been released from isolation.

Of the 90 cases in congregate living facilities in Vance County, 31 have been released from isolation.

13 individuals in Vance County are hospitalized.

There have been a total of 34 deaths in the Granville Vance health district – 24 in Vance County and 10 with the Bureau of Prisons in Granville County.

Also as of June 2, the Warren County Health Department NC reports 66 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Warren County; 2 are hospitalized; 49 cases have recovered; 2 deaths related to COVID-19 (both had underlying health conditions).

Confirmed positive cases in Warren County range from 12 years of age to 83 years of age.

Warren County Logo

Warren County Reports First COVID-19 Related Deaths

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-Information courtesy Warren County Government

Over the weekend, Warren County saw its first deaths attributed to COVID-19.

As of May 26, 2020, Warren County reported 54 confirmed positive cases; 33 recovered; five hospitalized; two deaths related to COVID-19. Both deaths were from hospitalized cases with underlying health conditions.

Warren County urges residents to continue to distance themselves from others, wash hands thoroughly and stay home if sick. While the state is easing restrictions,  continue to use safety precautions when leaving home.

Women With Children Needed as Health Focus Group Volunteers

-Information and flyer courtesy NC Cooperative Extension – Warren County Center

The Warren County Cooperative Extension Office is looking for local women with children to participate in a volunteer focus group on Wednesday, February 13, 2019, from 6 to 7 p.m.

Participants will provide the Poe Center, a health education organization, with feedback related to nutrition and physical activity in the community. Feedback provided will help prepare programs and health messages for Warren County.

The focus group will be held at the Warren County Cooperative Extension Office located at 158 Rafters Lane in Warrenton, NC.

Participants will receive a water bottle, tote bag, cooking magazine and magnet.

 

Kerr-Tar Area Agency on Aging to Host Dementia Education Conference

-Press Release, Kerr-Tar Regional Council of Governments

The Kerr-Tar Area Agency on Aging (AAA) and Dementia Alliance of North Carolina will host a Dementia Education Conference on Tuesday, August 7 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Check-in begins at 8 a.m. The event will take place at the Vance-Granville Civic Center, 200 Community College Road, Henderson.

The event is open to the public including caregivers, students, local leaders and aging professionals. The cost includes $10 for caregivers and $40 for Aging and Health Professionals. Register online at www.dementianc.org/henderson. Deadline to register is Tuesday, July 31.

Conference topics include Aging and Memory: What’s Normal and What’s Not, Redefining Technology for Caregivers, Adjusting Activities as Dementia Progresses and more! Breakfast and lunch will be provided, courtesy of Chef Christian Brown with Lake Gastronomy Catering.

Contact Harvey Holmes, Family Caregiver Specialist, with any questions or concerns at 252-436-2040 or hholmes@kerrtarcog.org.

Letters of Interest Are Due May 1, 2018

— press release

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation Offers Grant Opportunities for Health Programs

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation is seeking partners to help measurably improve health in Vance, Warren, Franklin, and Granville counties. The 2018 grant cycle is now open. Letters of Interest are due May 1.

To be considered for a grant with Triangle North Healthcare Foundation, you must represent a nonprofit organization, school, or governmental agency that serves the Triangle North region— Warren, Vance, Granville, and/or Franklin counties, according to the Foundation’s executive director Val Short. “Your project should fall into one of our five funding priorities, which are Chronic Disease, Mental Health & Substance Abuse, Nutrition & Physical Fitness, Success in School as related to Health & Fitness, and finally, Reproductive Health,” said Short.

The first step in the grant application process is the Letter of Interest, which is actually a form, available on the online Grant Portal, and accessed via the Foundation’s website, www.tnhfoundation.org.

“We ask that anyone interested in applying for a grant should contact us first to schedule a meeting,” said Short. “We can discuss the details of a project and determine if it falls within our funding guidelines.” To schedule a meeting to discuss a potential grant project, call 252-598-0763.

Since its first grant cycle in 2013, Triangle North Healthcare Foundation has awarded over $1 million in grants to a variety of programs and projects throughout the region, including the Henderson YMCA’s Save Our Kids and Girls on the Run programs, Boys & Girls Clubs’ healthy teen programs, N.C. MedAssist’s free pharmacy for the uninsured, Smart Start, and many others. A full listing of TNHF grant programs is available on the Foundation’s website.

The mission of the Foundation is “to encourage, support, and invest in quality efforts that measurably improve health in the Triangle North region.” The Foundation cannot accomplish this alone. “Through our partnerships with community organizations, formed through grantmaking, this Foundation can make a difference in the health status of our communities,” said Mrs. Short. “Please let us hear from you!” she added.

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation is a nonprofit regional grantmaking organization based in Henderson, NC, which supports and invests in health and wellness initiatives and programs that will impact health in a positive way in Warren, Vance, Granville, and Franklin counties. Funding for the Foundation’s grantmaking was made possible by the endowment established after the merge of Maria Parham Medical Center and Duke Lifepoint.

Is It Time for a Colonoscopy?

The following is re-published with permission from Maria Parham Health.  It is offered as news in the public interest.  It is not a paid advertisement.  This is not medical advice.  If you would like to view the original story on the MPH web page, please click here.

Do you remember when you used to put on your favorite bell bottoms and disco dance the night away? If you do, then it’s probably time to think about a routine colonoscopy screening. According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women, excluding skin cancers. And the vast majority of these cases occur in people 50 and older.

The good news is that the overall incidence of, and death rates associated with, colorectal cancers have been on the decline for more than a decade, thanks in large part to effective colonoscopy screenings that can detect the disease in its early stages.

“Colonoscopies are so important because they can improve our ability to detect colorectal cancer quickly and early, making the disease much more easily treatable” says Dr. Mark Dubinski, Gastroenterologist at Maria Parham Health. “Colonoscopies can also help us identify and remove colorectal polyps before they even become cancerous. The benefits are enormous.”

What are the symptoms?

Colorectal cancer often has no symptoms in its early stages – another reason that screenings are so important. Still, you should see your doctor if you have any of these warning signs:

Bleeding from the rectum;

Blood in the stool or in the toilet after a bowel movement;

Change in your bowel habits, including diarrhea or constipation or a change in the consistency of your stool;

Persistent cramping or discomfort in the lower abdomen;

An urge to have a bowel movement when the bowel is empty;

Constipation or diarrhea that lasts for more than a few days;

Decreased appetite;

Nausea or vomiting; and

Unintentional weight loss.

While these symptoms can also be indicative of other health conditions, your doctor can help you get to the root of the issue and determine the underlying cause.

How can I help prevent it?

Colonoscopy screenings are the number one way you can reduce your risk of colorectal cancer since the screenings can help detect the disease early or find polyps before they become cancerous. While the vast majority of new cases occur at age 50 and over, the disease does not discriminate and can happen to men and women at any age.

“We recommend that everyone talk to their doctor about their colorectal cancer risks and discuss when a colonoscopy could be right for them,” Dubinski says.

You can also be proactive in prevention in other ways. Living a healthy lifestyle that includes daily exercise, a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, limiting your alcohol intake and eliminating smoking can reduce your risk for colorectal and many other forms of cancer. Knowing your family’s medical history is also important – a history of the disease in your immediate family puts you at a higher risk for the disease.

Contact 800.424.DOCS (3627) to find a physician and take the next steps to schedule your colonoscopy today.

SIDEBAR: What to Expect During a Colonoscopy
Colonoscopies are an easier procedure than many realize. Shortly before the procedure, you will likely be given pain medication and a sedative to minimize discomfort. During the approximately 30-minute procedure, any polyps found will be removed by the doctor and tissue samples will be sent for a biopsy.

Keep in mind that you will be instructed to follow a special diet the day before your procedure and will need to have someone available to take you home afterward.

— courtesy MPH

(MPH is an advertising client of WIZS.  This is not a paid advertisement.)

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation’s 2018 Grant Cycle opens March 15

— press release

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation is seeking partners to help measurably improve health in Vance, Warren, Franklin, and Granville counties, with the opening of the grant funder’s sixth grant cycle on March 15, 2018.

To be considered for a grant with Triangle North Healthcare Foundation, you must represent a nonprofit organization, school, or governmental agency that serves the Triangle North region— Warren, Vance, Granville, and/or Franklin counties, according to the Foundation’s executive director Val Short. “Your project should fall into one of our five funding priorities, which are Chronic Disease, Mental Health & Substance Abuse, Nutrition & Physical Fitness, Success in School as related to Health & Fitness, and finally, Reproductive Health,” said Short.

The first step in the grant application process is the Letter of Interest, which will be due May 1st. The Letter of Interest form is available on the online Grant Portal, which can be accessed via the Foundation’s website, www.tnhfoundation.org “We strongly suggest that anyone interested in applying for a grant should contact us first to request a meeting,” said Short. “We can discuss the details of a project and determine if it falls within our funding guidelines.” To schedule a meeting to discuss a potential grant project, call 252-598-0763.

Since its first grant cycle in 2013, Triangle North Healthcare Foundation has awarded over $1 million in grants to a variety of programs and projects throughout the region, including the Henderson YMCA’s Save Our Kids and Girls on the Run programs, Boys & Girls Clubs’ healthy teen programs, N.C. MedAssist’s free pharmacy for the uninsured, Smart Start, and many others. A full listing of TNHF grant programs is available on the Foundation’s website.

The mission of the Foundation is “to encourage, support, and invest in quality efforts that measurably improve health in the Triangle North region.” The Foundation cannot accomplish this alone. “Through our partnerships with community organizations, formed through grantmaking, this Foundation can make a difference in the health status of our communities,” said Mrs. Short. “Please let us hear from you!” she added.

Triangle North Healthcare Foundation is a nonprofit regional grantmaking organization based in Henderson, NC, which supports and invests in health and wellness initiatives and programs that will impact health in a positive way in Warren, Vance, Granville, and Franklin counties. Funding for the Foundation’s grantmaking was made possible by the endowment established after the merge of Maria Parham Medical Center and Duke Lifepoint.

Researcher explores “Your Brain on Its Own” in VGCC lecture

— courtesy VGCC

To deal with change, manage stress and gain insight into making good decisions, it’s best to understand yourself and how your brain works, neuroscience researcher Phil Dixon shared with an audience at Vance-Granville Community College on Feb. 27, for his second of three sessions on “Using Your Brain for a Change.”

“In all of these situations, if you don’t understand yourself, you’re not going to be able to understand others,” Dixon said. A resident of Oxford, N.C., who is originally from England, Dixon has worked in a variety of industries around the world, including a time with Apple. His passion for neuroscience led to the series of lectures that are being sponsored by VGCC’s Office of the Endowment. The first was held in January, and he’ll conclude with a session later this month.

In the February session, “Your Brain on Its Own,” Dixon focused on various profiles, tendencies, influences and contexts that help persons understand who they are and how they are likely to react. His research about the brain is driven by a desire to help individuals become better leaders and make better decisions in their daily lives.

Dixon explored a variety of “profiles” designed to help individuals better understand themselves. The “Five Ps” profile, for example, reveals that we are all different. “What is a threat to one person may not be a threat to another,” Dixon noted.

“Character Profile,” meanwhile, begins with distinguishing individuals by whether they have an “ask” or a “tell” orientation. “To what degree do you tell people what to do, versus asking people what should be done?” he asked. From that vantage point, individuals are seen in one of four categories: Analytical (being correct vs. wrong), Driver (wanting results vs. fearing failure), Amiable (valuing relationships vs. fearing rejection) and Expressive (feeling exhilaration vs. a fear of not being good enough).

Meanwhile, knowing your tendencies — biases, habits, patterns of behavior, the triggers that may cause reactions, and paradigms — will help you better understand how to maintain your focus, Dixon explained.

He also noted the importance of understanding those things that have an influence on your life — beliefs, values, familiarity, memories, available choices, intelligence, etc. — and the context in which you view the world — your personal experiences, life cycles and recent events. “Your genetics make a difference,” he added. “The current data says that your genetics give you about 40 percent of your character.”

In discussing the dynamics of how the brain reacts to change, Dixon explored the learning process required should a person decide to go through a change — feasibility, appeal, agreeableness, resistance to change, readiness to change, and the celebration of small successes, among other points.

He recalled the character, “Yoda,” from the “Star Wars” movies, who said, “Do. Or do not. There is no try.” Dixon noted, “When we say that I’ll ‘try’ and do that, what happens in your brain? You set yourself up with an excuse. I only said I’ll try and do it. I didn’t say I’d do it.”

Dixon also explored strategies for dealing with stress, ways to prevent stress and how important it is to get enough sleep and maintain positivity in your life.

Decision making, he said, needs to be carefully planned. Making decisions is only sometimes logical, rational, conscious and data-based, he said. It’s often based on emotion and is nonconscious and irrational, clouded by tendencies such as bias, habits and patterns.

“To make good decisions, understand yourself. Be aware of what your tendencies are around decision making,” he offered. “Prepare the process of making decision before you have to make decisions.” For many people, the time of day for deciding is paramount. “If you have tough decisions to make, make them in the morning,” he said.

The best insights come when you are at your freshest, he said. “When do you have your best ideas?” he asked. “The conditions for having insight tend to be when you are relaxed, first thing in the morning, when you are jogging, when you are in the shower, when you are doing something repetitive that doesn’t require your pre-frontal cortex to be taking control, and when you’re not too happy. If you are only happy, those signals override it. When you are slightly reflective, slightly far away and when you are not thinking about the problem, those are the times you are likely to have your biggest insights.”

The concluding session in Dixon’s series, “Your Brain with Another Person,” scheduled for Tues., March 27, will explore bias and the nonconscious brain, communication, coaching, influencing and negotiating, encouraging innovation in others and helping others change. The lecture is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. to noon, in the small auditorium in Building 2 on VGCC’s Main Campus in Vance County. The public is invited. For more information, contact VGCC Endowment Director Eddie Ferguson at (252) 738-3264 or fergusone@vgcc.edu.

–VGCC–