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Henderson-Vance Crime Stoppers Approve New Text-a-Tip Program

Henderson, NC – Henderson and Vance County Residents will now be able to text the Henderson-Vance Crime Stoppers along with the traditional phone in method to report crime.

Kevin Bullock, the president of the Henderson-Vance Crime Stoppers said, “We’re still in the early stages of setting up our local Text-a-Tip program, but once completed, the Text-a-Tip will allow anyone with a cellphone to not only call 252-492-1925, but text in a crime they witness as well. Other Crime Stopper groups across North Carolina are using this technology with great success to reach younger audiences.”

The program will be ready to go later in the year.

Henderson Police Chief Marcus Barrow said, “Text-a-Tip will put us in contact with a new generation and also give others another simplistic way of reporting criminal activity anonymously.”

If anyone should have any information related to a case, they are encouraged to call the Henderson-Vance Crime Stoppers at 252-492-1925. Crime Stoppers offers a reward of up to $2,000 for information that may lead to an arrest. Callers may remain anonymous.

2017 Betsy Jeff Penn 4-H Summer Camp Announcement

It’s that time of the year again. For 100 years, 4-H summer camp has been a life-changing experience, offering campers a greater chance to learn, develop life skills and form attitudes that will help them to become self-directed, productive members of society.

Youth interact with people of different cultures and backgrounds, increasing interdependence, understanding and appreciation of others.  It may be their first experience being an equal member of a community.  Campers are exposed to professionals and role models who may lead career discussions.

Less focus is on competition and failure; more emphasis is on group cooperation and shared success.  Adventures, new experiences and skills learned in an outdoor environment at camp contribute to a positive sense of self.

Youth do not have to be in a 4-H club to participate.

Deadline to apply is March 31st.

Cost of camp is $100.00.  A deposit of $75.00 will hold your space.

Apply in person with Turner Pride, 4-H Youth Development Agent, 305 Young Street, Henderson, NC.

Call the Vance County Center of NC Cooperative Extension at 252-438-8188 or email [email protected] for more information.

North Carolina State University and North Carolina A&T State University commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, religion, creed, national origin, sex, age, disability, or veteran’s status.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.  North Carolina State University, North Carolina A&T State University, U. S. Department of Agriculture, and local governments cooperating.

Multiple Trials Resolved in Vance County – Office of the DA

Henderson, NC – Jurors in Vance County Superior Court found Antwon Burt guilty of Battery on an Unborn Child and Simple Assault after hearing one day of testimony. Officers with the Henderson Police Department testified about their 2016 investigation of the defendant. Mr. Burt was sentenced to 210 days in the North Carolina Department of Public Safety, Division of Adult Correction (DAC). That sentence was suspended for 18 months of supervised probation by Judge Henry W. Hight, Jr. Mr. Burt was represented by Deborah Leigh Holtzman and Adam Mincher.

In the second jury trial of the week long session of Superior Court in Vance County, Melvin McDonald was found guilty by a Vance County jury of Resisting a Public Officer and Possession of a Firearm by a Felon. Judge Hight sentenced McDonald to an active sentence of 17 to 30 months in the DAC. McDonald was on probation at the time he was charged by officers with the Henderson Police Department. Judge Hight revoked McDonald’s probationary sentence as well. The defendant was represented by Scott Hamilton.

Maurice Manning plead guilty to Assault Inflicting Serious Bodily Injury. Judge Hight sentenced Manning to a 16 to 29 month sentence that was suspended for 24 months of supervised probation to begin after the defendant had served a portion of his sentence in jail. Detective B. Logue with the Henderson Police Department investigated the case. Mr. Manning was represented by Nick Bagshawe.

Peter Lagattuta plead guilty to Felony Possession of Cocaine. Judge Hight sentenced Lagattuta to a 6 to 17 month sentence that was suspended for 18 months of supervised probation. Officer J. Henderson with the Henderson Police Department charged the defendant. Mr. Lagattuta was represented by J. Paul Stainback.

Arthur Henderson was found guilty of Driving While Impaired and Carrying a Concealed Gun after entering a plea of no contest. Mr. Henderson was given a 60 day sentence that was suspended for 12 months of supervised probation in each of his cases. B. Yarborough who was formerly with the Henderson Police Department charged Mr. Henderson with the gun charge, while Trooper J. Harrah with the NC State Highway Patrol charged Mr. Henderson with Driving While Impaired. The defendant was represented by Michael F. Rogers.

Jonathan Dailey plead guilty to Assault on a Female and was given a 75 day sentence that was suspended for 18 months of supervised probation. J. Aiken with the Vance County Sheriffs Office was the complainant. Defendant was represented by Deborah Leigh Holtzman.

Stanley Bullock, Jr. plead guilty to misdemeanor breaking and entering and misdemeanor larceny. Mr. Bullock was given a 45 day sentence that was suspended for 18 months of supervised probation by Judge Hight. Detective J. Jones with the Vance County Sheriff’s Office investigated the case. The defendant was represented by Dorothy Lewis.

Vance County Schools Empowerment Academy Students create local garden

Administrators and students at the Vance County Schools Empowerment Academy have created a garden outside of the facility’s main entrance with funding from a special grant program.

The grant funding, totaling about $170, came from the Karma for Cara Foundation which funds youth volunteer projects.

Brian Schlessinger, a teacher at the Empowerment Academy, led efforts to apply for the grant and create the garden. He worked with his students and administrators at the academy to seek the grant funding and follow through on building the garden that is beside the facility’s main entrance.

The garden was completed by early February after students and their teachers worked to prepare the soil, install landscaping timbers for borders for the garden and had soil brought in to fill the space. They then worked to plant tulip bulbs, two evergreen shrubs and a cedar tree in the garden. Schlessinger and students are shown in the first two photos as they work on the garden.

Antavius Turner, a seventh grader who was attending the Empowerment Academy and is now a student at Eaton-Johnson Middle School, was one of the students involved in the project. Turner is shown with Schlessinger in the third photo as they work online to complete paperwork for the grant funding.

“Building the garden was a really good experience,” Turner said. “All of us in the academy worked together to get it done. We wanted to give the area outside the building life and make it look nice. We really like how it turned out and I think the project helped to show when you give us another chance we can do good things.”

The four female students and 10 male students who attend the Empowerment Academy are all on long-term suspension from their home schools because of behavior issues. Girls attend classes at the academy in the mornings and the boys attend their classes in the afternoons each day. Schlessinger and other teachers, along with Dr. Ralphel Holloman, coordinator of the academy, work with the students in online course work as well as teacher led math and language arts classes on a daily basis. Turner spent the first semester of this school year in the Empowerment Academy. He was able to return to Eaton-Johnson for the beginning of the second semester in late January after he completed necessary course work and met attendance and behavior requirements.

“All of the Empowerment students pitched in to help with the garden project,” Schlessinger said. “It made them feel good to have a role in creating it. We hope to do more with the garden at a later time and continue to improve the appearance of the areas outside of the building.”

Schlessinger pointed out that the funding from the Karma for Cara Foundation was a perfect fit for the academy’s project. The foundation was established in memory of Cara Becker, who lived in Maryland and at the age of 21 was diagnosed with leukemia. She battled the disease for four months, but died of complications from her treatments in December of 2012. Her family has carried on her legacy through the foundation. Becker throughout most of her short life was involved in volunteer work and community service. She had a special interest in helping children who were experiencing tough times and promoted community involvement with those her age and beyond. The foundation regularly awards small grants for community projects involving youth groups and also recognizes the efforts

VGCC names 258 students to President’s and Dean’s Lists

Vance-Granville Community College has announced that 126 students earned President’s List and 132 earned Dean’s List academic honors for the fall semester that ended in Dec. 2016.

The President’s List recognizes students who achieved a perfect 4.0 grade-point average (GPA) while carrying a “full load” (of at least 12 credit hours) in 100-level or higher curriculum courses. To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student had to earn a GPA that was at least 3.5 but less than 4.0, and have no grade lower than “B,” while carrying a “full load” of such courses.

Fall Semester President’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

Accounting:

Sarah J. Gabriel and Ciara S. Lynch, both of Franklinton;

Wannapha N. Robinson of Louisburg;

Elizabeth D. Elliott of Youngsville.

 

Associate Degree Nursing:

Madelaine L. Sachs of Henderson;

Renee Jackson of Kittrell.

 

Associate in Arts:

Samantha J. Shannon and Tamiya R. Thomas, both of Creedmoor;

Joshua Jacobs of Durham;

Ryan W. Sharp of Franklinton;

Cristin D. Abbott, Nancy C. Bonilla, Kourtney J. Cockrell, Ashlyn K. Collier, Chadstity V. Copeland, Caroline M. Oakley, Autumn G. Outlaw, Ebony S. Robinson Solomon and Janet Rodriguez-Morales, all of Henderson;

Leslie A. Leake of Kittrell;

Marshella D. Ashby and Makayla R. Williams, both of Littleton;

Loganne S. Driver, Blake A. Massengill and Joshua W. Moody, all of Louisburg;

Kristy R. Ball, Robin L. Hill and Sydney A. Towers, all of Oxford;

Amanda B. Miller of Warrenton;

Lindsay C. Henry of Youngsville.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Tyler A. Thorp of Henderson;

Rachel H. Allen of Stem.

 

Associate in Science:

Jordan S. Ligon of Bullock;

Michael T. O’Donoghue of Fredericksburg, Va.;

Lucas R. Hamrick and Elizabeth R. Twisdale, both of Henderson;

Sovanny Taylor of Louisburg;

Alana W. Towles of Oxford;

Skylar L. Davenport, Nicholas J. Didonna, III, and Joseph A. Moore, all of Youngsville.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Michael L. Wright of Durham;

Jeremy D. Lemay, Kenneth S. McConnell and Jacob F. Mosley, all of Henderson;

Jordan A. Alston of Louisburg;

Travis L. Keeton of Oxford;

Stephen B. Ray of Wake Forest.

 

Business Administration:

Korena L. Weichel of Creedmoor;

Roy A. Satterwhite of Henderson;

Stacy T. Hicks, Latosha C. Hunt, David L. Nicholson and Meghan J. Rossi, all of Oxford;

Jason L. Thompson of Stem.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Andrew S. Dawson of Henderson.

 

Computer Technology Integration – IT Support Track:

Tristin McClay of Creedmoor;

Max N. Moore, Jr., of Henderson.

 

Computer Technology Integration – Networking and Security Technologies Track:

Andrew A. Dadson of Butner;

Christina D. Manz of Creedmoor.

 

Computer Technology Integration – Web Design and Support Track:

Angelica M. Garcia-Avelar of Durham;

Rowan M. Morris of Warrenton.

 

Cosmetology:

Cassie A. Shaffer of Butner;

Christianne Combs of Durham;

Katrina W. Collie of Franklinton;

Micaela B. Crowder of Henderson;

Kristina M. Brantley and Kathryn L. Overby, both of Louisburg;

Kierra N. Richardson of Macon;

Myranda L. Carroll of Norlina.

 

Criminal Justice:

Christopher L. Davis of Bullock;

Martin A. Spencer of Creedmoor;

Monica A. Williams of Franklinton;

Andrew J. Shultz of Henderson;

Benjamin B. Layton of Kittrell;

Safwan A. Ali of Louisburg;

Chance S. Hayes of Louisburg;

Alissa J. Cheek of Wake Forest.

 

Culinary Arts:

Rebecca N. Groover of Franklinton;

Randy D. Bullock and Dejah Davis, both of Stem.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Kimberly C. Cagney of Creedmoor;

Bianca E. Garrett of Franklinton;

Jacquella S. Jones of Henderson;

Brooklyn E. Mason of Louisburg.

 

Electronics Engineering Technology:

George C. Williams of Louisburg.

 

Entrepreneurship:

Raeann Johnson of Henderson.

 

Global Logistics and Distribution Management Technology:

Charles Braswell of Raleigh.

 

Human Services Technology:

Fredesvinda C. Euceda-Col of Creedmoor.

 

Information Technology:

Andrew B. Benedict and Dustin L. Starnes, both of Henderson;

Cody R. Parrott of Kittrell;

Austin H. Smith of Oxford.

 

Mechatronics Engineering Technology:

Charles J. Nordcliff of Creedmoor;

Thomas K. Boyd of Henderson.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Cassidy B. Lucas of Franklinton;

Morrisha K. Alston, Tranita N. Brown and April B. Peoples, all of Henderson;

Beverly K. Ellis of Kittrell;

Kristie L. Brough of Oxford;

Amber S. Carey of Stem;

Rebecca T. George of Warrenton;

Julia A. Rhodes of Youngsville.

 

Office Administration:

Angela M. Hayes of Louisburg.

 

Paralegal Technology:

April M. Thompson of Henderson;

Holly H. Cashwell of Wake Forest;

Heather C. Bryant of Youngsville.

 

Pharmacy Technology:

Tommy L. Hicks of Franklinton.

 

Radiography:

Anna P. Tilley of Creedmoor;

Sabrina D. Johnson of Louisburg;

Kristel L. Dehart and Aaron J. McNeill, both of Oxford;

James A. Lea of Timberlake;

Jamisha D. Twitty of Warrenton.

 

Welding Technology:

Nicholas Keeton of Bullock;

Cedric J. Rodebaugh, II, of Franklinton;

Galen D. Wilds of Granville County;

Donnie S. Ayscue and Eduardo Ibarra-Renteria, both of Henderson;

Ethan T. Bailey, Christopher M. Kearney and Robert L. Mallory, all of Oxford;

David A. Jeanblanc of Raleigh;

Jared Q. Siemers of Wake Forest;

Andrew Lynam of Youngsville.

 

Fall Semester Dean’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

 

Accounting:

Holly A. Waddell of Henderson;

Jennifer M. Burton of Norlina.

 

Associate Degree Nursing:

Caitlin E. Moen of Cary;

Heather J. Floyd of Franklinton;

Rachel A. Edwards of Louisburg;

Talia M. Dyce and Sharon N. Ray, both of Oxford;

Sandra H. Enloe of Stem;

Brooke A. Hursey and Kayla D. Roberson, both of Wake Forest.

 

Associate Degree Nursing LPN to ADN Program:

Ashley B. Jones of Bullock.

 

Associate in Arts:

Kaleb S. Williamson of Bullock;

Tiffany Martinez of Butner;

Farrah B. Foster, Robert C. Hurt, Janella A. Mendivil and Owen T. Mettam, all of Creedmoor;

Poppy T. Boze, Rebekah H. Glasheen, Robert D. Osborne, Benjamin P. Taylor and Richard K. Washington, all of Franklinton;

Celene Acuna, Jasmine N. Allen, Anthony M. Henderson, Lynn M. Henderson, II, Alexandra J. Saravia, Brian J. Stevenson, Jakayla M. Thorpe and Bailee E. Tippett, all of Henderson;

Lillian D. Kanouff and Allie R. Beach, both of Kittrell;

Asia M. Green of Norlina;

Cecilia E. Barrenechea, Sonia M. Hernandez, Emely K. Ovando, Kimberly M. Spence and Thomas S. Thompson, all of Oxford;

Ashleigh V. Dannemiller of Raleigh;

Kamden E. Thompson of Stem;

Casey P. Hunter and Clay D. Walters, both of Wake Forest;

Sarah A. Boone of Warrenton.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Paige D. Snider of Creedmoor;

Taylor M. Moseley of Henderson;

Danny W. Ayscue of Kittrell;

Stormi M. Abernathy of Leasburg;

Megan I. Proctor of Macon;

Marina E. Rombout of Stem.

 

Associate in Science:

Lindsey R. Perry of Henderson;

Kia S. Brodie of Louisburg;

Sara A. Abdulla, Nicole F. Bowman, Zakaria I. Kassim and Francis C. Scotland, all of Oxford;

Micah C. Roberts of Stem;

Kellyann M. Cook of Stovall.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Blake A. Larcade of Oxford.

 

Bioprocess Technology:

Kimberly A. Prevette of Oxford.

 

Business Administration:

Andrew J. Cagney and Bobbie J. Wilkerson, both of Creedmoor;

Angela Burrell    and Alfredo Picaz, both of Henderson;

Mark A. Alston of Manson;

Jason D. Hester of Oxford;

Dar-Neshia S. Williams of Warrenton;

Ashley M. Kinton of Youngsville.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Steven J. Lynch of Norlina.

 

Computer Technology Integration – IT Support Track:

Quinton McDonald of Henderson.

 

Computer Technology Integration – Web Design and Support Track:

Amie E. Hilton of Oxford.

 

Cosmetology:

Jessica K. Lovegrove of Creedmoor;

Brittany D. Pickering of Durham;

Davis B. Moore of Franklinton;

Hannah C. Beckwith of Henderson;

Angela M. Alexander of Kittrell;

Melissa D. Sweeney of Louisburg;

Crystal L. Carrington, Loukita C. Meadows and Katy S. Perdomo, all of Oxford;

Jordan G. Reina of Roxboro;

Maria G. Ordonez Santiago of Warrenton;

Kristina F. Graham and Nancy H. Paduchowski, both of Youngsville.

 

Criminal Justice:

Tyler L. Hughes of Bullock;

Charmaine A. Sutton of Louisburg;

Dustin L. Hodnett and Harold T. Todd, both of Oxford;

Vickie A. Crawley of Roxboro.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Jessica R. Bolton and Makala West, both of Henderson;

Catherine G. Jones of Youngsville.

 

Entrepreneurship:

Austin R. Lovegrove of Franklinton.

 

Human Services Technology:

Sonya J. Barnes of Henderson.

 

Human Services Technology/Gerontology:

Larecia R. Bullock of Oxford.

 

Information Technology:

Mitchell L. Greene and Nathan E. Johnston, both of Creedmoor;

Brandon J. Carver of Durham;

Genifer R. Gibson of Fayetteville;

Kasey R. Owens of Henderson;

Kassidy L. Holtzman of Norlina;

Tina M. Kreidler and Alisha M. Prevette, both of Oxford;

Nathan L. Garrard of Stem.

 

Medical Assisting:

Dajane G. Johnson of Henderson.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Melanie Lugo-Nieves of Creedmoor;

Raven K. Kay and Raini Williams, both of Henderson;

Brianna N. Lynch of Hollister;

Misty R. Grabowski of Louisburg;

Tina M. Hatcher and Anthony M. Wade, both of Oxford;

Thomas M. King, Jr., of Wise.

 

Office Administration:

Mary A. Elberson of Henderson;

Mary Cox of Oxford.

 

Paralegal Technology:

Kelly D. Persinger of Louisburg;

Lindsay E. Brown of Oxford.

 

Radiography:

Ashley B. Storer of Creedmoor;

Trevor M. Houston of Durham;

Mary E. Brewer, Kelsey P. Hight, Kara Siena S. Reese and Madalyne N. Woods, all of Henderson;

Kaitlyn B. Sumner of Hurdle Mills;

Chelsea J. Flaxcomb of Kittrell;

Maricela Carbajal, Mary D. Currin and Jonathan T. Liddane, all of Oxford;

Jaime L. Wilson of Raleigh;

Morgan H. Keith of Stem.

 

Welding Technology:

Hernan J. Hernandez of Castalia;

Eric L. Clayton and Keodric D. Grant, both of Oxford.

 

–VGCC–

Red Cross and Kerr-Vance Academy Team up for Blood Drive

RALEIGH, N.C.(Feb. 15, 2017) – During Red Cross Month in March, the American Red Cross encourages eligible donors to join in its lifesaving mission by giving blood.

Since 1943, every U.S. president has designated March as Red Cross Month to recognize how the Red Cross helps people across the country and around the world. Red Cross Month is a celebration of supporters, who are the face of the Red Cross in their communities and bring hope to people facing emergencies.

Blood donor Timothy Sheely knows the need firsthand. His wife required 12 units of blood during emergency surgery following the birth of their son. “If it had not been for blood donors, she might not have survived,” he said. “Thanks to generous blood donors, I still have a wife and my kids still have their mom. I can’t possibly thank those people in person, but I can give a little piece of me back with each donation for the greater good.”

The Red Cross depends on blood donor heroes across the nation to collect enough blood to meet the needs of patients at approximately 2,600 hospitals nationwide. Donors of all blood types, especially type O, are needed to help those rely on blood products.

Make an appointment to become a hero to patients in need by downloading the free Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting redcrossblood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Upcoming blood donation opportunities:

Henderson

3/8/2017: 8 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Kerr Vance Academy, 700 Vance Academy Road

How to help

Simply download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

Blood donors can now save time at their next donation by using RapidPass to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, prior to arriving at the blood drive. To get started and learn more, visit redcrossblood.org/RapidPass and follow the instructions on the site.

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

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VGCC receives Perkins career training grant

Vance-Granville Community College has been awarded a $181,631 grant for the current academic year under the federal Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006. These funds are being used to support students enrolled in VGCC’s workforce-oriented programs with student success coaches and the modernization and expansion of career-training equipment.

A portion of the funds support personnel at VGCC’s Student Success Centers, who serve as advisers to work with students in Business and Applied Technologies programs throughout their training — from enrollment to completion. The college also provides industry-advised faculty development to keep instructors up-to-date on the latest technologies through the grant funding.

“In conjunction with other grants and funding sources, the Perkins grant enhances our ability to educate, inspire and support students in technical fields, which are so vital to our college mission and to the economic health of our region,” said Dr. Stelfanie Williams, president of VGCC. “With help from this grant, our outstanding faculty and staff in career-oriented programs give students the practical training they need to succeed in the workforce.”

Perkins funds allow classes at all four VGCC campuses to have up-to-date career training equipment, including a manikin/wig dryer and, soon, a state-of-the-art facial imaging machine for Cosmetology students, drill presses for Welding trainees and 26 new webcams to continue to expand VGCC’s award-winning online course offerings.

Efforts to provide apprenticeships and to educate high school students about careers in advanced manufacturing also received a boost from Perkins funding.

The Perkins Act is the principal source of federal funding to states for the improvement of secondary and postsecondary career and technical education (CTE) programs. The North Carolina Community College System, which administers Perkins funds through competitive grants to the 58 community colleges in the state, also provides extensive training to faculty throughout the year and, publicly, on their newly launched teacher-training portal at www.nc-net.info.

“Funding through Perkins and other workforce grants currently at work on VGCC campuses are positioning us well for the expected job growth in our region,” according to Kaine Riggan, VGCC’s grants coordinator. “Perkins funds are expected to shift more towards work-based learning, and we are stocked, staffed and ready for it.”

Riggan added that with a healthy number of local manufacturing jobs and a comfortable commute to the Research Triangle Park area, the four counties served by VGCC have been a favored investment for federal workforce development funds in recent years.

For more information on VGCC Business & Applied Technologies programs, contact Dean Angela Gardner-Ragland at [email protected] or (252) 738-3226.

–VGCC–

City of Henderson Offers Update on Water Situation

PRESS RELEASE: 15 February 2017

The City of Henderson/ Kerr Lake Regional Water System has begun the repair on a 36” water main just outside the water plant.  Due to the repair procedure, some customers may experience periods of cloudy or discolored water; however, it is safe to drink. This should clear up by the evening of February 16, 2017. While there should be no disruption of service during this time, we do ask customers to practice conservation of water during this time and not to use fire hydrants except for emergency purposes.

Should you have any questions concerning this repair please contact Christy Lipscomb, KLRWP Director at 252-438-2142.

VGCC President honors English department

The president of Vance-Granville Community College, Dr. Stelfanie Williams, recently recognized a group of faculty members for excellence by awarding the “Vanguard Cup” to the college’s English department.

The department became just the second recipient of the cup, an honor created by Dr. Williams to recognize “exceptional team performance toward the college mission, vision and strategic plan.”

In this case, the English department was particularly noted for developing a strategy to improve students’ writing skills, which would in turn help them be more successful in all of their college courses. “The English faculty developed a new course with dedicated labs in an attempt to improve student success,” Dr. Williams said.

“In the first semester of implementation, the students improved, and by the spring semester, the English 111A course held a 100% course success rate,” the president noted. “This means that students are better prepared for their fields and for university transfer. The faculty in the English department are to be commended for their innovative efforts to help VGCC students.”

David Wyche, chair of the VGCC English department, added, “I’m grateful for this recognition of the creativity and hard work that these English instructors contribute in countless ways every day.”

He said that two former colleagues also deserved credit. “The English 111A lab is the legacy of Biology instructor Button Brady’s vision. She saw a need and worked tirelessly to meet it before she retired,” Wyche said. “Former instructor Bridget Bell created English 111A and taught it until the birth of her second child, when she decided to devote more of her time to being a mom. I am indebted to both of them.”

The English department is a unit of the VGCC division of Arts and Sciences, which offers courses that transfer to four-year colleges and universities as well as general education for students in all of the college’s curriculum programs.

–VGCC–

Vance County 4-H To Offer Poultry Show Interest Meeting

You’re Invited To The 2017 Poultry Show and Sale Interest Meeting.

4 County 4-H Poultry Show & Sale

If you ever wanted to learn how to raise your own chickens, now is your chance!

All children ages 5-18 are invited to join us at 6:30 PM at the Vance County Regional Farmer’s Market (210 Southpark Dr, Henderson, NC 27536) to discuss plans for the 2017 Four County 4-H Poultry Show and Sale.  A free dinner will be served, so RSVP with your county Extension Office!

Interested?

Please Contact Turner Pride with any questions and concerns.

Available via phone (252) 438-8188 and email at [email protected].

Join Vance County 4-H Today!

Vance County Cooperative Extension Center, 305 Young St, Henderson, NC 27536