Vance County Middle & High School Win First Place in State Video Contest

-Press Release, Vance County Schools

Vance County High School and Vance County Middle School each won first-place trophies in the N.C. School Boards Association State Conference video contests for schools across the state during the organization’s annual event held at the Koury Convention Center in Greensboro, November 12 – 14.

Vance County High School theater arts students, under the direction of their teacher Samantha Campbell, accepted their award during the evening of November 13. They went on stage in the Guilford Ballroom and patiently waited for the top video selection to be announced. Hoke County High School received the third-place trophy and A.L. Brown High School finished second.

N.C. School Boards Association officials present the first-place trophy and $3,000 check to Vance County High School students, starting third from left to the right, Jaida Lewis, Kahlil Kingsberry, Arianna Long and Isaac Bell McLean. (Photo Credit: VCS)

Accepting the award for the Vance County High Vipers were Jaida Lewis, Arianna Long, Kahlil Kingsberry and Isaac Bell McLean. Lewis made comments on behalf of her fellow students and her school. She thanked everyone who supported them and worked with students to produce the video. A special thanks went to Campbell and to Destiny Ross, a technology and curriculum specialist with the school system, who led the development of the award-winning video

At the end of her comments, Lewis noted, “We are all Vance County Proud!”

Vance County High School received a handsome trophy and a check for $3,000 as the first-place winner in the competition, which included impressive video entries from approximately 30 high schools across North Carolina.

The Vance County Middle School Jaguars were awarded first place in the middle school video competition during awards recognitions held on November 12. Darlynn Oxendine, chairperson of the Vance County Board of Education, accepted the trophy and a $100 gift certificate on behalf of the school and its students. There were over 50 entries in the middle school video competition, with the Jaguars’ entry selected as the best.

Both of the schools’ videos were about 60 seconds in length and followed the theme “What is Super about Public Schools.”

Darlynn Oxendine, chairperson of the Vance County Board of Education, center, accepts the first-place trophy on behalf of Vance County Middle School at the N.C. School Boards Association State Conference from NCSBA officials Minnie Forte-Brown, left, and Paige Sayles. (Photo Credit: VCS)

The Vance County High School video features the music of the popular song “This Is How We Do It” with new words and singing done by students at the school. Led by the theater arts students, the video shows a variety of locations and classes within the high school and includes a large number of students and some school staff. The video has lots of energy, bright colors and a good variety of classroom and outdoor scenes, with the words written by the students scrolling across the bottom of the screen

The Vance County Middle School video follows a “Star Wars” type of theme and has a futuristic look. With student narration, background music and lots of impressive special effects, the video explores the future look of public schools. It also features different students shown in areas throughout the middle school.

Edward Ortega, now the assistant principal at both L.B. Yancey and Pinkston Street elementary schools, led the efforts to produce the middle school video. He was assisted by teachers and administrators at the school, as well as having great cooperation and participation by students.

The Vance County Middle School and Vance County High School students and educators who produced the videos will be honored by the Vance County Board of Education at its meeting on Monday, November 19, beginning at 7 p.m. in the school system’s Administrative Services Center.

‘Vance Virtual’ Labs Officially Open in Vance County Middle, High School

-Press Release, Vance County Schools

Vance County Schools hosted ribbon-cutting ceremonies at Vance County Middle School and Vance County High School on November 9 to officially open the schools’ “Vance Virtual” or “V2” laboratories.

The laboratories, located in the schools’ media centers, feature approximately 24 digital learning stations each for students to engage in interactive three-dimensional instruction using special computer software applications in a wide range of subject areas including science, health and geography.

The establishment of the laboratories is being made possible through a $400,000 grant awarded to the school system from the Golden Leaf Foundation. The grant was awarded during last school year and following the completion of construction work the laboratories are now open.

Vance County Board of Education member Ruth Hartness watches as Vance County Middle School students explain how they are using the zSpace digital student learning center and three-dimensional software application in the new Vance Virtual lab in their school. (Photo: VCS)

“Vance Virtual” has the largest number of zSpace digital learning stations of any school system on the East Coast of the United States and one of the largest deployments of the stations in the nation.

The zSpace STEM Learning Initiative represents a new direction for instructional delivery and academic outcomes for the students in Vance County. This initiative will systematically and intentionally embed the technical and essential skills into our instructional programs to ensure student readiness for the local, regional and global workforce.

The digital student-learning stations will be available for use by students in the middle school and high school, as well as the STEM Early High School.

Teachers will be trained on specific skills to utilize virtual reality technology in the delivery of their individual content areas. Wikis, blogs and an e-lesson repository will be constructed to allow teachers to share and collaborate as they train and implement new strategies.

Business and industry partners will engage with our Career and Technical Education program teachers to develop a functional profile of the worker needed to support their industry. These skills and attributes will be embedded in the core competencies and outcomes of each learning module. Students will have direct interaction with virtual reality (VR) and artificial intelligence (AI) software to enhance their level of knowledge, understanding and application of science, career and technology coursework.

Vance County High School students work with software applications on the zSpace learning centers in their school’s new Vance Virtual lab as the large digital screen on the wall follows their actions. (Photo: VGCC)

The school system received valuable support from the Vance County Board of Commissioners for the virtual reality project and the Golden Leaf Foundation grant funding.

“The launch of this project represents a seismic shift in the learning ecosystem of our school district,” said Dr. Anthony Jackson, superintendent of Vance County Schools. “This game-changing technology is cutting-edge and provides our students with real-world hands-on opportunities to engage collaboratively, think critically, communicate effectively and create authentically in a rigorous and challenging academic environment.

“Through our Vance Virtual Workforce Labs, we are confident that our students will leave us with the essential skills necessary to effectively navigate and compete in the local, regional and global workforce,” he continued. “This is yet another example of the academic ‘Vanceformation’ taking place in our schools and in our community. I am indeed Vance County Proud.”

“Students in Vance County Schools are ready to explore science, math and other content areas at a higher level of application in environments that are technology-based,” added Dr. Cindy Bennett, assistant superintendent for Student Services and Strategic Planning. “Vance Virtual labs will provide that opportunity with virtual and augmented reality experiences and investigations in an interactive learning environment. As educators, we continue to seek to bring the brick and mortar models of education into the 21st Century. Vance Virtual labs do just that and our students will investigate tomorrow TODAY!”

Registration Underway for Spring Semester at VGCC

 -Press Release, Vance-Granville Community College

Registration for classes has begun for the Spring 2019 semester at Vance-Granville Community College, which starts Monday, Jan. 7, 2019.

In addition to the traditional 16-week semester session, VGCC is offering a 12-week term, two 8-week terms and two 4-week terms for the Spring.

“We know that our students have busy lives, going to college, taking care of a family and working, in most cases,” said Jeff Allen, VGCC’s dean of enrollment and outreach. “Vance-Granville wants to meet students where they are and help them get to where they need to be. We recognize that flexibility in scheduling is more important than ever.”

The full 16-week semester, starting on Jan. 7, concludes on May 6. Hundreds of courses are being offered on each of the college’s four campuses in Vance, Granville, Franklin and Warren counties, and online courses are available, including eight curriculum programs offered totally online.

The four-week “Spring Forward” mini-term begins Dec. 17 with a registration deadline of Dec. 13. Classes for this session will end on Jan. 15. The session is designed for students who are home for the holidays and want to pick up extra classes to help them get ahead in their studies, Allen said. Most of the courses have credits that are transferable to other colleges and universities, but students are always encouraged to check with their advisers to guarantee transferability to other institutions. Course offerings include computers, criminal justice, American history, music appreciation, American government, psychology and sociology, among others.

A second four-week mini-term, labeled “March Forward,” is scheduled for March 5 through April 1, with a registration deadline of March 1. The course list for this mini-term includes management, criminal justice, success and study skills and college transfer success.

The first of two 8-week sessions will begin on Jan. 7 and run through March 5. The second 8-week session starts March 5 and concludes May 6, with a registration deadline of Feb. 28. These two mini-terms offer dozens of courses.

A 12-week mini-term also offering dozens of classes begins Feb. 5 and runs through May 6, the registration deadline coming Jan. 31.

All of the courses offer the full credits a student normally receives. The schedules for the mini-terms are compressed to allow students to complete the coursework in less time.

In addition to the curriculum courses are continuing education opportunities for those wanting job training or new skills or personal enrichment and basic skills for those seeking a high school equivalency or an adult high school diploma.

Registration for the 16-week Spring classes opened Thursday, Nov. 1, and closes on Thursday, Jan. 3. College officials advise students to apply for admission and financial aid, request transcripts from high school or other colleges and schedule a placement test. Students will then meet with an academic coach to register for classes, followed by an orientation session. Students are advised to register for classes as early as possible to secure the classes they need to take.

The upcoming semester’s course schedules and a link to ARCHES, the latest edition of the college’s guide to enrollment, are now available online at schedules.vgcc.edu.

The tuition payment deadline for the 16-week semester is Thursday, Jan. 3, by 5 p.m., if paying in person, or by midnight, if paying online through the college’s online WebAdvisor.

For more information, contact VGCC at [email protected] or (252) 738-3234, or visit any campus.

FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE

Prospective students interested in seeking financial assistance are encouraged to immediately complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.gov and to visit the VGCC Financial Aid Office.

Eligible students may receive Pell Grants ranging from $343 to $3,047 per semester. Students may also qualify for other college or state funds. The Financial Aid Office recommends completing the FAFSA and all financial aid documents by Wednesday, Dec. 12. In order for a student to charge tuition, fees, and books to financial aid awards, the student’s entire financial aid file must be completed prior to the tuition payment deadline of Thursday, Jan. 3. Students with preschool-age children may receive financial assistance to help pay for child care, and applications for this help are also available at the Financial Aid Office.

Information about other resources is available online at financialaid.vgcc.edu.

For more details regarding financial assistance, visit the Financial Aid Office in Room 8215 on Main Campus or call (252) 738-3280.

HELP FOR VETERANS

Military veterans who wish to use their Veterans’ Education benefits may contact the Financial Aid Office at (252) 738-3522. Veterans should check with Financial Aid to see if the programs in which they are interested are covered.

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VGCC, Southeastern Open New Pathway For Students

-Press Release, Vance-Granville Community College

Vance-Granville Community College and The College at Southeastern have entered a partnership to provide a “ready-made pathway” for students to be dually enrolled on their way to a Bachelor of Science degree at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

In VGCC’s Civic Center, colorfully decorated with banners displaying the various applied technology, business and health sciences academic programs offered by Vance-Granville, a ceremony was held on Monday, Oct. 22, for the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding between the two colleges.

“Partnership is very important as you think about higher education today,” said Dr. Levy Brown, Vance-Granville’s vice president of academic affairs. “We hear about pathways. We hear about multiple entry points for students. We hear about collaboration. Today we are very excited to join Southeastern in this opportunity to provide more training opportunities for their students.”

Dr. James Dew of The College at Southeastern, left, and Dr. Levy Brown of Vance-Granville Community College sign a memorandum of understanding officially launching a partnership that provides a “ready-made pathway” for students to be dually enrolled at the two colleges on their way to a Bachelor of Science degree at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. (Photo: VGCC)

The partnership opens a new door for students at The College at Southeastern ([email protected]) in Wake Forest to earn additional credentials in the career and technical education areas, nearly 40 curriculum programs, at Vance-Granville, Dr. Brown noted, citing the significance of the regional collaboration.

With plans for the partnership in the works for several years, Dr. James Dew, Vice President of Undergraduate Studies and Distance Learning and the Dean of The College at Southeastern, said he was pleased to see two institutions working together rather than being competitive in their recruiting efforts. Students have had to choose between schools when pursuing their college educations, he said, “either here or there but not both.”

“We can do far more together than we can do apart from each other,” he said. “I think the days are gone, or should be gone, when we compete against each other in unnecessary ways.”

“As we sat down to think about the possibilities,” Dr. Dew added, “what we began to realize is that there are actually ways that we can serve each other. You have students in your vocational programs who ultimately desire to do something for the Lord. And we have students who very much want to do something for the Lord but are going to need along the way various kinds of vocational training to get there.”

At [email protected], he said, they refer to the situation as the “Tentmaker’s Paradigm.” Citing Acts 18:1-4, he described how the Apostle Paul had a vocation of making tents. “He would go from place to place, and as he went he would build tents and that would give him a platform to preach the Gospel to the nations,” Dr. Dew said.

“That ultimately is our vision,” he added. “We are training a generation of people at Southeastern to go into the darkest places in the entire world, places where there is no hope, places where the darkness is thick and depression is strong. And there in those places shine their light of Jesus Christ to those places and to those nations. But to get there … they are going to need the kinds of programs that we see represented here in this room.”

He said [email protected] wants their students to have these kinds of programs that VGCC offers, but “I also understand that they need the kinds of theological and ministerial training that we can offer them at Southeastern as well.”

[email protected] began in 1994 as an undergraduate school of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (SEBTS) in Wake Forest. Students who are pursuing their Bachelor of Science degree from SEBTS have had the option to transfer in an associate’s degree from another college, dually enroll in a vocational program at another college or complete a business minor at [email protected]

The partnership will provide a clear pathway, the college officials noted.

Among the highlights of the partnership:

  • [email protected] students may enroll in as many as 12 credit hours per semester at VGCC and have those hours count towards their status at [email protected]
  • Southeastern students who complete an associate’s degree, diploma or certificate of study in a VGCC-approved vocational and/or applied technical program will receive full credit for courses taken in which a grade of “C” or better was earned.
  • [email protected] will also accept credits from high school and early college high school students enrolled in an approved Career and College Promise (CCP) track through VGCC.
  • VGCC will allow students to dual enroll in a Bachelor of Science degree program at [email protected]

The partnership also allows for a seamless integration of recruitment initiatives between both colleges.

Dr. Dew recognized Cory Thornton of the Youngsville-based Frigi-Temp commercial heating, air conditioning, ventilation and refrigeration service provider for being a part of a three-way meeting with VGCC and [email protected] last year that eventually led to the partnership. Thornton is the chief operating officer of the licensed mechanical contracting company which is now a partner in VGCC’s Vanguard Apprenticeship Collaboration.

Dr. Dew added, “We began to think together about what your curriculum looks like, what ours looks like and the various ways that we can partner broadly by taking the diplomas, the certificates and the associate’s degrees offered here in vocational trainings at Vance-Granville and let the students either come to Southeastern after they finish here by way of transfer or to work on those degree programs concurrently.”

“It is a unique day in the life of Southeastern when I can begin saying to our students, ‘Hey, you should also go to this school,’” he said. “Praise God for good things that He has brought. I’m excited for this day.”

VGCC’s Interim President Dr. Gordon Burns applauded the “efforts, insights and wisdom” of Dr. Brown and Dr. Dew “and all of those colleagues who supported them in our two institutions.”

“Thank you for making this day possible,” he added. “I think it’s especially important that we allow the doors to be open for further higher education. By accepting our credits at your college, you open the door to new opportunities to advance study, and for that, we are most grateful,” Dr. Burns said.

Also instrumental in the creation of the partnership is VGCC’s project manager for the TechHire grant, Ken Wilson, who also spoke to the staff and faculty from both institutions who gathered for the signing. “We look forward to wonderful times ahead for this great partnership,” Wilson said.

Questions about the partnership can be directed to Ken Wilson at VGCC by phone at (252) 738-3259 or by e-mail at [email protected] or Dr. Brent Aucoin at The College at Southeastern by phone at (919) 761-2286 or by e-mail at [email protected].

Click here for a Flickr album with photographs from the signing ceremony: https://www.flickr.com/photos/vancegranvillecc/albums/72157703270339775

VGCC Honors 2018-2019 Faculty And Staff Members Of Year With Awards

-Press Release, Vance-Granville Community College

An instructor who also is leading one of VGCC’s curriculum programs and a director of a jobs skills training program for the unemployed and underemployed have been honored as outstanding employees for 2018-2019 at Vance-Granville Community College.

Stewart Lyon, a Biology instructor at VGCC and the point of contact for the Bioprocess Technology curriculum program at the Franklin County Campus, was named Faculty Member of the Year at the college, and Blondelle Edgerton, director of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) program, was selected as the Staff Member of the Year.

Above: VGCC’s 2018-19 award winners are Faculty Member of the Year Stewart Lyon, left, and Staff Member of the Year Blondelle Edgerton, right. Dr. Gordon Burns, VGCC’s Interim President, center, has praised both employees for their commitment to Vance-Granville’s mission of educating, inspiring and supporting students. (VGCC photo)

The honors are two of VGCC’s three Glen Raven Excellence in Teaching and Leadership Awards for 2018-2019. Glen Raven, Inc., the custom fabrics manufacturer with a facility in Warren County, is a longtime partner and supporter of the college. In addition to sponsoring the annual stipends to recognize excellence among VGCC instructors and staff members, Glen Raven has endowed several scholarships for students.

Lyon and Edgerton are now eligible to be considered for the N.C. Community College System’s statewide R.J. Reynolds Excellence in Teaching and BB&T Staff Person of the Year awards, respectively.

“Stewart and Blondelle are two outstanding leaders among the faculty and staff at our college,” Interim President Dr. Gordon Burns said. “Every day, they are dedicated to our college’s mission of educating, inspiring and supporting a diverse community of learners to achieve professional and personal success. Their extraordinary commitment, positivity and expertise are appreciated by both students and colleagues.”

Stewart Lyon

Stewart Lyon joined the VGCC faculty in August 2013 as an adjunct instructor for Biology at VGCC’s South Campus in Creedmoor. In January 2014, he came on board as a full-time Biology instructor, teaching classes at all four of VGCC’s campuses — South, Franklin, Warren and Main. In the Fall Semester of 2017, he became the point of contact for the Bioprocess Technology program based at Franklin Campus.

A 2007 graduate of North Carolina State University with his Bachelor of Science degree in Biological Sciences, Lyon earned his Master of Science degree in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology from East Carolina University in 2010. He has a graduate certificate in Business Foundations from ECU, in 2014, and is currently is working in non-degree graduate studies in Chemistry with Montana State University.

“Stewart has a unique approach to teaching cultivated to help students understand why they are learning the course material by connecting the content to aspects of their own lives,” said VGCC’s Interim President Dr. Gordon Burns. “He grabs their attention and the students are more likely to be motivated, resulting in a more successful learning environment. He has built rapport with his students and demonstrated a sincere desire to help them learn.”

Lyon has recently carved out some time from his Biology teaching and leadership of the Bioprocess Technology program to represent VGCC’s faculty on the Achieving the Dream Core Team as the college works to implement, align and scale cutting edge reforms to improve student success, Dr. Burns added.

Among his activities at the college and in the community, Lyon has participated in the Leadership Program of the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce. He has volunteered for area public high school science fairs. He also was an event leader for the Science Olympiad, taught classes for VGCC’s Summer Science Camp for middle school children, and coordinated VGCC Earth Day celebrations at Main Campus and Franklin Campus.

“Stewart displays very high levels of professionalism and he intentionally engages students, colleagues and the general public with enthusiasm, positivity, and reminders that we are all making a difference in students’ lives,” said Cecilia Wheeler, VGCC’s Dean of Arts & Sciences.

Blondelle Edgerton

Blondelle Edgerton came to Vance-Granville in September 1995 as a part-time education specialist for what was the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) program, later renamed the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) program. She became full-time in 1999, and in August 2004, she became a program analyst and job developer for WIA. Less than two years later she became the supervisor for the program while still serving as job developer. She was elevated to director of the program, her current position, in February 2013. The program in recent years was renamed Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

She received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science at East Carolina University in 1994. Since then she has had professional training in nearly two dozen areas related to her role in WIOA. She is a member of the North Carolina Employment Training Association (NCETA), and she volunteers on the Community Advisory Committee of the Franklin-Granville-Vance Partnership for Children.

“Blondelle is deeply committed to the mission of our college and the North Carolina Community College System to open the doors to educational opportunities for the people of the communities served by Vance-Granville,” said Dr. Burns. “Through her position with the WIOA, she works with the unemployed, underemployed, economic disadvantaged and those who need to upgrade their job skills. She makes sure eligible students get help with tuition, fees, books, supplies, transportation, counseling, work experience and job placement.

“Clearly the right person for this critical job, Blondelle has a heart for her students and understands well the obstacles they face as she helps them ascertain their goals and aspirations,” Dr. Burns said.

Edgerton has built partnerships for work experiences with businesses and organizations in the community, and she has structured her program at VGCC in such a way that it is a model for the Kerr-Tar Council of Governments and the Workforce Development Board, the administrators of the federal funding for the program.

“Blondelle unselfishly assists students and staff far above her normal job responsibilities,” Kali Brown, VGCC’s Dean of Student Support Services, added. “She has assisted other employees with reporting requirements, served as a chaperone at the annual Youth Summit, and even watered plants in our administration building. She is an employee that every supervisor dreams of having.”

Vance Co. Board of Education’s Nov. Meeting Rescheduled

-Information courtesy Terri Hedrick, Public Information Officer, Vance County Schools

The Vance County Board of Education meeting originally scheduled for Monday, November 5, 2018, has been rescheduled to Monday, November 19.

The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. in the Board Room of the school system’s Administrative Services Center at 1724 Graham Avenue in Henderson.

Dr. Anthony Jackson Talks School Consolidation Success, State of the Schools

Dr. Anthony Jackson, superintendent of Vance County Schools, was on Thursday’s edition of WIZS’ Town Talk program to discuss the success of the school consolidation process and his recent State of the Schools address.

Jackson began the show by thanking the community for the support the school system received throughout the entire consolidation process for Vance County Middle School and Vance County High School.

“From the day the school board made the decision to consolidate the schools to the opening of school, we had approximately 120 days,” said Jackson. “I’m so proud of this community, our students, our parents and our staff for the work that they did during that period of time to get us to what we like to call ‘the launch.'”

According to Jackson, the launch of the newly consolidated schools in August went smoothly and was a great start to the 2018-19 school year.

“What we have seen since is what we hoped would come to fruition – a community coming together. I was at the football game a few nights ago and it was a joy to see the number of kids on our sidelines participating and the number of parents in the stands,” Jackson said.

State of the Schools Address

In Jackson’s recent address to the public, he announced that the majority of the system’s 15 schools showed marked improvement during the previous school year. “When I arrived in Vance County, nine schools were designated as low-performing. This year, I’m pleased to announce that 11 of our 15 schools met or exceeded growth and received a school performance grade of a C or better.”

Jackson credits this success to a number of factors including a shift towards focusing on the best way to reach and teach each individual student. “We focus on high student achievement by figuring out how best to teach every child – not just the low or high performers. Every single child deserves the best education,” said Jackson.

Other factors, according to Jackson, include making the environment as safe as possible so teaching and learning can take place, hiring and retaining high-quality educators and being efficient with resources.

“We change mindsets about what we can do in this community and if we work together, we can accomplish our goals.”

To listen to the interview in its entirety, click here.

VGCC Honors 10 In Emergency Medical Tech-Paramedic Program

-Press Release, Vance-Granville Community College

Vance-Granville Community College honored 10 students who completed the college’s Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic program in August.

The graduates included Kaylee Bradsher of Roxboro, Joseph Carpunky of Henderson, Reginald Collins of Henderson, Paul Currin of Norlina, Lawrence Green of Wake Forest, Kaylelynn Grindstaff of Louisburg, William Holder of Roxboro, Abigail Milton of Henderson, Aaron Porterfield of Wake Forest, and Mario Wright of Henderson.

The class, which began in August 2017, was instructed by Vivian Loyd, a Registered Nurse and Paramedic Level II instructor.

Above: Seated, from left, are Mario Wright, Paul Currin, Kaylelynn Grindstaff, Abigail Milton, and William Holder; standing, from left, instructor Vivian Loyd, Aaron Porterfield, Lawrence Green, Kaylee Bradsher, Reginald Collins, Joseph Carpunky, and EMS Coordinator Stephen Barney. (VGCC photo)

EMT-Paramedic instruction includes 660 hours of didactic (classroom) training and 400 hours of clinical education, or field internship. To be eligible to take the EMT-P course, students had to have already completed a 203-hour EMT-Basic course and passed a state exam.

An EMT-Paramedic has enhanced skills beyond the EMT-Basic level, including being able to administer additional interventions and medications. The EMT-P delivers the highest level of pre-hospital medical care in North Carolina.

Students had to pass several different exams, including a “scope of practice” exam, in order to successfully complete the EMT-P course. The scenario-based evaluation tested the hands-on and critical thinking skills of students as they delivered the appropriate treatment to multiple trauma patients and dealt with pediatric, environmental, and mental illness situations. Each student also had to complete an 80-hour Anatomy and Physiology course.

With the completion of the EMT-P course, the students take the 100-question North Carolina Office of Emergency Medical Services credentialing exam to become state-certified.

VGCC offers Emergency Medical Services training from the basic to the Paramedic level, in addition to continuing education, with most of the classes being taught in Building 10, the new home for Emergency Medical Services training, located on Main Campus across from the main entrance to the college. For more information on enrolling in these courses, call EMS Coordinator/instructor Stephen Barney at (252) 738-3273.

VGCC Franklin Campus Hosting Education Night For Adult Learners

-Press Release, Vance-Granville Community College

Vance-Granville Community College’s Franklin County Campus is hosting a special event for new and returning adult learners to learn more about its plans for Evening & Weekend College.

Education Night for Adult Learners will be held on Thursday, November 1, at 6 p.m. at the campus located at 8100 N.C. Highway 56 in Louisburg.

“The Evening & Weekend College will serve all learners at Vance-Granville, with an emphasis on the adult learner,” said Bobbie Jo May, dean of the Franklin Campus. “Our campus will provide placement testing and counseling services on some evenings and weekends, and we’ll offer hybrid sections of courses with classes on campus once per week or even once per month to meet the busy schedules of adult learners. The college is strategically planning to meet the diverse needs of this population.”

As a part of the Evening & Weekend College, Franklin Campus will offer many courses for the upcoming Spring Semester through the College Transfer program, including English, Math, Biology, Introduction to Computers and Psychology. The Career and Technical Division will offer courses in the Welding, Paralegal, Medical Office Administration, Business Management, Biotechnology, Medical Assisting and Early Childhood Education curriculum programs.

VGCC’s Franklin Campus also offers a robust selection of courses through the Continuing Education division during the day, evenings and weekends for the Spring Semester and the Summer Terms in 2019: among them, Nursing Assistant, Medication Technician, Phlebotomist, Notary Public, Biotechnology, Human Resource Specialist, and Healthcare Administration.

“We encourage those who are interested in how the Evening & Weekend College can accommodate their schedules to come to the Franklin Campus on November 1 so that we can help them achieve professional and personal success in their lives,” said May.

VCS Announces Make-Up Days for Schools on Traditional Calendar

-Press Release, Vance County Schools

The student days missed on Thursday, October 11 and Friday, October 12 in Vance County Schools will be made up on the traditional calendar as follows:

  • Wednesday, October 31, 2018, will now be a full school day to make up missed instruction time on October 11
  • Friday, November 9, 2018, will now be a full school day to make up missed instruction time on October 12

Parent conferences at schools on the traditional calendar will now be scheduled for Tuesday, November 13, and Thursday, November 15, from 3 to 6 p.m. each day.

E.M. Rollins Elementary School and Vance County Early College High School will follow their school calendars as originally planned.