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TownTalk: Night Out Against Crime Event Coming To Downtown Henderson

Like many other areas around the state and nation, Henderson and Vance County is no stranger to crime. Crime happens and law enforcement agencies need help to solve these crimes. That’s where Crime Stoppers comes in. They provide tips that can solve or even prevent crimes.

Cash rewards of up to $2000 are available if a tip results in an arrest and conviction. In order to make those rewards possible fundraisers need to happen.

The Night Out Against Crime here locally will take place on Breckenridge St. from 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, September 21.

Tonya Moore and Lorraine Watkins of Henderson-Vance Crime Stoppers told WIZS’s Trey Snide on TownTalk there is important information to pass along to residents who attend the free event but plenty of fun and entertainment is to be had as well.  Event organizers are expecting around 500 people to attend on Tuesday and will be treated to performances by the Vance County High School Cheerleaders, the Clearview Church Praise Team, the High Grass Bluegrass Band and the gospel choir Work in Progress. At the end of the program a drawing will be held for a big screen TV.

One of the focuses of the event is to reach young people “We really, really need to get in touch with young people to get them pointed in the right direction,” Watkins said. “Not a day goes by without a shooting or a robbery,” Watkins continued.

Watkins also addressed the need for the community to step up and provide local law enforcement with the information they need to help solve or prevent crimes but pointed out that people are afraid to talk or give information to law enforcement agencies.  Crime Stoppers uses the P3 app for cell phones to make tips completely anonymous. With the app users can supply pictures, video and other information to police departments or sheriff’s offices and the use is completely anonymous. A code is used as calls and texts are routed across the country before arriving back in Henderson so the tips can be investigated. Watkins said that if someone sees a crime about to happen the P3 app can be used and law enforcement agencies will be able to intervene before the crime ever happens. “Proactive is better than retroactive everyday,” Watkins said.

According to Moore, those interested in finding out more about Crime Stoppers should follow them on Facebook. Crime Stoppers is composed of volunteers and Moore and Watkins say it’s all about making Henderson and Vance County a better place.

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City of Henderson Logo

City Council Trying to Account for Desires and Make Improvements

The Henderson City Council met Monday, September 13. The areas around two congested intersections appeared on the agenda. In both cases the understanding of the parties involved led to Council decisions.

For a couple of years, there has been interest from a developer to do something with the parcels of land at 1337 and 1343 Dabney Drive at the corner of Lynne Avenue. Unlike in 2019 and 2020, Councilman Garry Daeke said the City agreed to go ahead and rezone the property this time. He said it was made very clear a forthcoming site plan from the developer could not include ingress and egress from the residential side of the property onto Lynne Avenue. A cul-de-sac will be built to close off Lynne Avenue from Dabney Drive.

Daeke said, “I still worry about in the future as we do this. The exits from this property will turn into a lane that turns back into the mall, so I’m not sure how people will be able to exit and leave and do it safely but certainly DOT will be involved in this. We hope this works out. I’m still a little apprehensive about the traffic flow of it, but I think we’ve got what we want to have in terms of not moving traffic into a neighborhood.”

It’s believed at this point, the existing property owner will sell to the developer, the developer will raze the property for redevelopment, sell a portion of the land back to the city for the cul-de-sac and as a result of the process additional development will occur at that location on Dabney Drive.

Across town a piece, the former Henderson Laundry building stands vacant at an intersection, Chestnut Street and Andrews Avenue, that sees 20,000 cars a day go by. Councilman Daeke says Vance County has given it’s portion of the property to the City of Henderson.

In order to apply for the North Carolina Dry Cleaning Solvent Cleanup Act (DSCA) funds, a single owner needed to be listed. It’s an understood the County will stand back up on the matter later.

A lot of expense could be lurking. Chemicals and cleaning products are in the ground there and in the building.

Daeke said, “It’s going to be tricky. We won’t know until we get in there. We know there are some chemicals that have got to come out. There are some machines still in there that have the same chemicals in them. They have to come out. And then the remediation of the property is where the costs may be. It could be as simple as trying to clean it up … It could be the building cannot be demolished because of some issues, and we’ll have to remodel it. That was a real throw to me the other night. I didn’t know that, and that could be very expensive, so it’s going to be tricky to get that done. But that’s such an important corner, entry into the city as we try to move traffic into downtown from Highway 39 and from the interstate. And that’s such an eyesore, and we want to clean that up and do something there or make it available for development. But there are going to be some costs to do that.”

The plan is – Proceed in such a way that the DSCA program limits the City/County exposure for outside remediation of the solvents to $16,000. The City Council Agenda packet information indicates it is estimated $15,000 is needed for equipment and chemical removal from inside the building alone. The next step in what could be a long process.

BLET Cadets Provide Backup For Highway Litter Sweep

Students in the Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) program at Vance-Granville Community College had the opportunity recently to apply what they are learning about service by answering a call for help from fellow students.

VGCC’s Criminal Justice Technology curriculum program participates in the Adopt-a-Highway program and tend to a stretch of Poplar Creek Road near the college’s main campus. But this year, program head Andrea Hyson, asked Brandon Bishop, BLET director/instructor, for a little backup.

“I was quick to volunteer the BLET Academy class in order to help out,” Bishop said. It was a perfect opportunity to give the 17 cadets a tangible teaching and mentoring activity to help the community. The cadets are on the path to becoming well-trained and well-rounded law enforcement officers, Bishop said. But there’s more to being a law enforcement officer than just enforcing the law.

“We also share the responsibility of being leaders and caretakers within the communities we serve,” he said. “We, as a profession, need to be grounded in service to our communities and their specific needs, whether those needs are large or small. When these cadets graduate and become sworn officers in our communities, our intention is for them to have obtained a sense of responsibility. We want them to have a sense of ownership for creating change, growth and positivity.”

Hyson said she is very grateful for the help from instructor Tony Clark, Bishop and all the BLET cadets.

Contact Bishop at 252.492.2061, ext. 3263 or bishopb@vgcc.edu to learn more.

Home and Garden Show

On the Home and Garden Show with Vance Co. Cooperative Ext.

  • Farmers Market
  • Getting to Know Your Land
  • Before tilling up an area of your garden, take a picture of what was growing there and record it in your garden journal so you can rotate vegetables in that area next year.
  • Sow your tall fescue seed now though mid-September. Get soil seed contact and water frequently.
  • Consider planting cover crops such as crimson clover to provide nitrogen for next year’s garden.
  • Don’t put grass clippings in the compost pile.
  • Consider constructing a greenhouse or cold frame to extend your growing season.
  • When planting trees and shrubs this fall, consider choosing native plants that produce berries to help birds get through the winter.
  • Take your soil samples now to avoid the rush !!!!!!!
  • Don’t apply lime to your lawn unless indicated by soil analysis.
  • You can plant beets, sweet peas, bulb onions, mustard, lettuce, collards, arugula.
  • Visit the Memorial Garden at the Vance County Regional Farmers Market to see what’s blooming late in the season.

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TownTalk: FGV Ducky Derby Takes To Garnett Street Sept. 18

If you’ve ever wondered what it looks like to have 2,000 rubber duckies float down Garnett Street, then come out Saturday, Sept. 18 for the 12th annual Ducky Derby to benefit Franklin-Granville-Vance Smart Start.

Garry Daeke, FGV development coordinator, said he is looking forward to another successful fundraiser, despite some necessary adjustments because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Sponsors have really stepped up to support the event, Daeke said. “Sponsorships have been off the charts,” he told John C. Rose on Wednesday’s Town Talk. With the promise of good weather and generous sponsors, Daeke said the event is shaping up to be the best yet.

The public is invited to come out for the noon event, he said. This year, however, all the ducks will have the name of a child care employee, whose names were submitted by more than 100 child care providers in the three-county service area.

The first prize winner gets $1,000, second prize is $500 and the last-place finisher gets $100.

Child care workers and providers have suffered financial hardships during the pandemic, and Daeke said FGV is pleased to honor these essential workers at the Derby.

“They’ve had a tough, tough year,” Daeke said. This is one way to “bring a little light into how much we depend on them to take care of our children and so parents can go back to work.”

All proceeds go back into program services.

The race starts at Garnett Street and Breckenridge Street and ends a couple of blocks away at the corner of Garnett and Orange. Spectators should expect to wear a mask and maintain social distancing safety protocols.

The FGV Smart Start provides services for families who may be looking for child care, as well as a wide range of services for child care providers.

“If we can get our children prepared and ready for school…that’s a key element in their success after school,” Daeke said.

The FGV helps to fund literacy programs that increase young children’s accessibility to books and reading. Having a caring support system around you, no matter what your resources are, helps children achieve their potential, he said.

Visit www.fgvsmartstart.org. to learn more.

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BBQ Fundraiser to Benefit Misty Bailey Scheduled for Oct. 2nd.

The Fight For Misty BBQ Fundraiser to benefit Misty Bailey and her family will take place on Saturday Oct. 2 at Harriet Baptist Church, 1354 Ruin Creek Road in Henderson from 1 to 5pm. BBQ will be sold by the pound at a cost of $10 per pound. In 2019 Misty was diagnosed with Cardiac Sarcoidosis, a rare disease that disrupts the heart’s rhythm, blood flow and normal heart function causing very aggressive inflammation around the heart.

She had a pacemaker implanted to monitor her heart rhythm and detect irregular heartbeats. In addition to numerous medications, Misty endures Remicaid IV Infusions every six weeks at Duke Hospital to reduce inflammation around her heart. These infusions last approximately 18 to 24 months. Cardiac Sarcoidosis is incurable and will require ongoing long-term treatment.

The BBQ for the fundraiser is being prepared by Doug Puckett and Tim Brummitt. Tickets can be purchased in advance or the day of the event. Purple “Fight for Misty” silicone bracelets will also be on sale the day of the event for $1.

TownTalk: ACTS Makes a Joyful Noise with Benefit Concert

Imagine hosting the biggest Thanksgiving meal ever, providing all the food for the biggest family imaginable. Every day. There’s the food preparation, then serving, then the cleanup. That’s how Lee Anne Peoples describes the operation at ACTS – the executive director said it takes dozens of volunteers to provide the hot meals five days a week for area residents.

It takes volunteers – and money – to feed sometimes as many as 200 people each day, Peoples told John C. Rose Tuesday on Town Talk.

Area Christians Together in Service is sponsoring a fundraiser on Sept. 25 at McGregor Hall that Peoples said will serve the dual purposes of raising money for ACTS as well as providing entertainment for the community.

“Make a Joyful Noise Unto the Lord” is set for Saturday, Sept. 25 at McGregor Hall and will feature local talent for an evening of inspirational entertainment for the whole family.

The doors open at 6 p.m. and the performance begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 and children 12 years and under get in free.

Tickets are available from any ACTS board member or from the ACTS office at 201 S. William St. Tickets also are available at the door.

Anyone interested in performing for the concert can contact Peoples for details at  252.492.8231 or lapeoples@actsofhenderson.org.

There are several sponsorship levels that businesses or individuals can purchase, she said, adding that the community has long been supportive of ACTS and the work it does to feed hungry people. Sponsor levels are platinum ($1,000), gold ($500) and silver ($250) and include ads in the concert program.

In 2020, Peoples said ACTS served 25,527 meals. She’s done the math for 2021 and if the numbers continue as they are now, 2021 will top 30,000. In a city with a population of about 15,000, that’s a lot of meals, she noted. “I’m surprised at how the numbers have jumped up” in the past couple of years, Peoples said.

In addition to the hot meals, ACTS provides food boxes, dozens of Backpack Buddies (weekend bags of food for schoolchildren) and Mobile Meals for people who can’t make it to the ACTS location.

All these ongoing projects get done largely through the work of about 45 loyal volunteers who come on a regular basis. “There is absolutely no way we could do what we do without volunteers,” Peoples said. And there is always a need for more help, especially in the afternoons. Many of the volunteers leave at noon or shortly thereafter, but there are still things that need to be done in the afternoons. “Even if you just have a few minutes between 12 and 2, it would be a big help.”

Just like that gigantic Thanksgiving dinner – the food has to be put away, the kitchen cleaned up and ready for the next day.

For complete details and audio click play.

 

TownTalk: BBQ Cook Off Promises Great Food and Fun

– Update Sept 15

The second annual Tri-County BBQ competition is Sunday, Sept. 19 at Kerr Lake Country Club.  Organizer Tracy Mosley said the competition is a fundraiser of Helping All People Excel, Inc., a local nonprofit that, among other things, helps college-bound students from Vance County with some necessary school expenses. The cookoff will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at KLCC, 600 Hedrick Drive, Henderson.

The inaugural event provided help to a dozen college students, she said. This year, she hopes to be able to provide assistance to 15 students.

“We don’t want them to have any barriers when they’re in college,” Mosley, H.A.P.E.’s executive director told John C. Rose on Monday’s Town Talk. Mosley said there are lots of programs that provide backpacks and school supplies, to those in high school and below, but those young people who have graduated high school and who are headed off to college sometimes get left out.

Mosley calls them “lost in the sauce” costs – things like a printer, or copy paper, or even household items like plates, silverware and washing powder.

Some of those items are costly, she said, adding that and her organization deals with many first-generation college students whose parents may not be aware of all the things a college student may need.

“We work to eliminate obstacles and barriers that youth in our area face …as they work to reach their potential,” Mosley said. “There are real expenses associated with going off to college.”

The BBQ cookoff is a fun way to raise money for this effort. Tickets are $5. Get there early and enjoy samples off the contestants’ grills, she said. In addition to the competition, the Sept. 19 event will have numerous community resources on site to share opportunities for young people. There will be food trucks and a deejay, too, until 3 p.m. when Jim Quick and Coastline take the stage. The band will perform from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

If Mosley has her way, the Tri-County BBQ competition will become Henderson’s “signature event,” much like Oxford’s Hot Sauce Contest and Clarksville’s Lakefest. She would love to outgrow the Kerr Lake Country Club and have next year’s contest in downtown Henderson.

Learn more at kerrlakebbq.eventbrite.com and helpingallpeopleexcel.com.

For complete details and audio click play.

 


– Update Sept 13

Time is ticking for cook teams to register for the second annual Tri-County BBQ competition – the cookoff is Sunday, Sept. 19 at Kerr Lake Country Club and organizer Tracy Mosley said tonight (Monday) is the deadline to register. The fee to register is $100. Call Mosley today at 252.432.1131 to register a team.

The competition is a fundraiser of Helping All People Excel, Inc., a local nonprofit that, among other things, helps college-bound students from Vance County with some necessary school expenses. The cookoff will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at KLCC, 600 Hedrick Drive, Henderson.

The inaugural event provided help to a dozen college students, she said. This year, she hopes to be able to provide assistance to 15 students.

“We don’t want them to have any barriers when they’re in college,” Mosley, H.A.P.E.’s executive director told John C. Rose on Monday’s Town Talk. Mosley said there are lots of programs that provide backpacks and school supplies, to those in high school and below, but those young people who have graduated high school and who are headed off to college sometimes get left out.

Mosley calls them “lost in the sauce” costs – things like a printer, or copy paper, or even household items like plates, silverware and washing powder.

Some of those items are costly, she said, adding that and her organization deals with many first-generation college students whose parents may not be aware of all the things a college student may need.

“We work to eliminate obstacles and barriers that youth in our area face …as they work to reach their potential,” Mosley said. “There are real expenses associated with going off to college.”

The BBQ cookoff is a fun way to raise money for this effort. Tickets are $5. Get there early and enjoy samples off the contestants’ grills, she said. In addition to the competition, the Sept. 19 event will have numerous community resources on site to share opportunities for young people. There will be food trucks and a deejay, too, until 3 p.m. when Jim Quick and Coastline take the stage. The band will perform from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

If Mosley has her way, the Tri-County BBQ competition will become Henderson’s “signature event,” much like Oxford’s Hot Sauce Contest and Clarksville’s Lakefest. She would love to outgrow the Kerr Lake Country Club and have next year’s contest in downtown Henderson.

Learn more at kerrlakebbq.eventbrite.com and helpingallpeopleexcel.com.

For complete details and audio click play.