Franklin Co. Resident Arrested on Multiple Drug Violations

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-Franklin County Press Release

On July 11, 2019, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office Drug Unit and Special Response Team arrested Franklin County resident, Jerome Usher Jr., age 33, for multiple drug violations. 

The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office Drug Unit received multiple complaints alleging that Jerome Usher Jr. was involved in the illegal use and sale of controlled substances in and around the Bunn area. The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office Drug Unit was able to corroborate the information and the investigation led to the arrest of Mr. Usher as well as the execution of the search warrant at his residence.

On July 11, 2019, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office Drug Unit and Special Response Team arrested Franklin County resident, Jerome Usher Jr., age 33, for multiple drug violations. (FCSO photo)

The investigation and arrest resulted in the seizure of controlled substances, drug paraphernalia and US Currency. 

Sheriff Kent Winstead stated, Addressing the illegal use and sale of drugs in our communities continues to be a priority for our staff. This emphasis will continue to be a primary focus as we continue to work towards making all of our neighborhoods safer.” 

Jerome Usher Jr. 1010 Alford Mill Road Bunn, NC 27508 

Jerome Usher Jr. was charged with the following: One (1) count of Possession with Intent to Sell and Deliver Crack Cocaine, one (1) count of Sell and Deliver Crack Cocaine, and one (1) count of Maintain a Dwelling/Vehicle for the purpose of Selling Controlled Substances

Jerome Usher Jr. was placed in the Franklin County Detention Center under a $20,000 secured bond. 

For more information regarding this investigation, or to provide information regarding drug activity in your community, please contact Sergeant Ken Pike at (919)496-2186

Terry M. Wright, Chief of Staff

VGCC Small Business Center to Offer Free QuickBooks, Financial Classes

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-Information courtesy Sheri Jones, Director, VGCC Small Business Center

The Vance-Granville Community College Small Business Center is offering two free, three hour classes entitled “Quick Start Bookkeeping with QuickBooks.”

The classes will be offered on Wednesday, July 31, 2019, at the times and locations as listed below and is being taught by Semone Brisson, an Accountant and QuickBooks Consultant of Brisson’s Accounting out of Salisbury, NC. A description of the classes content is below and registration is required.

If you, your members or someone you know could benefit from these classes, please forward the following information and registration links to them.

The links can also be accessed from our website at https://www.vgcc.edu/coned/small-business-center/#schedules.

CLASS DESCRIPTION

1)  “Quick Start Bookkeeping with QuickBooks”

This informative seminar is geared toward the novice bookkeeper and QuickBooks user. An accountant and QuickBooks consultant will show you how to set up and use QuickBooks desktop software for everyday accounting tasks in the simplest, most efficient way possible for your company or non-profit.

Topics include:

  • Setting up a company file quickly
  • Understanding and designing financial statements
  • How items and classes work
  • When to use receivables, payables and bank feeds
  • What is a “set of books” and how does it work?
  • What bookkeeping practices do I need?

This seminar will benefit both QuickBooks desktop and online users. It is not intended to be a “step-by-step hands-on class” and does not require a book. Questions are welcomed and encouraged.

“Quick Start Bookkeeping with QuickBooks”
Wednesday, July 31 from 6 – 9 p.m.

Kerr Lake Country Club – 600 Hedrick Dr. Henderson, NC 27537

Registration Link:  https://www.ncsbc.net/workshop.aspx?ekey=530390033

2) “Understanding Financial Statements”

Maintaining and understanding financial information is critical to running a profitable small business. This three hour seminar helps small business owners focus on using key financial reports to understand and operate their businesses. The seminar also explains how small business owners can use their financial statements to identify potential problems before they become serious threats to the business’ survival.

“Understanding Financial Statements”

Wednesday, July 31 from 1 – 4 p.m.
Vance-Granville Community College, Bldg. 7 – 200 Community College Road Henderson, NC  27536

Registration Link:  https://www.ncsbc.net/workshop.aspx?ekey=530390035

NC Dept. of Agriculture Asks Travelers to Watch for Spotted Lanternfly

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-Press Release, NCDA&CS

The North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Plant Industry Division is asking travelers to several northeastern states to take precautions against the spread of the highly destructive Spotted Lanternfly this summer.

“If your summer travel plans have you driving through Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Delaware or New Jersey, please review the Spotted Lanternfly quarantine map and do your part to prevent bringing the pest to our state,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “This invasive pest poses a significant threat to our $91.8 billion agriculture industry.”

North Carolina has no reports of this invasive pest. Spotted Lanternfly is an invasive planthopper native to China that could cause billions of dollars in loss to NC agriculture, tourism and trade should it become established in our state. This pest is a hitchhiker and can be easily moved long distances on vehicles, campers and outdoor equipment.

If you plan to visit any of the indicated northeastern states in which Spotted Lanternfly has been found, it is recommended you thoroughly wash and inspect your vehicles before leaving. Also, do not move firewood.

All life stages of Spotted Lanternfly can hitchhike, but the eggs and adults pose the greatest risk for movement. In northern states, adults can lay their eggs on any outdoor flat surfaces from July to December.

We hope you enjoy your summer travels, and we appreciate your attention to ensure this pest does not hitch a ride home with you.

For more information on current counties that are under quarantine, please visit: https://nysipm.cornell.edu/environment/invasive-species-exotic-pests/spotted-lanternfly/

 

State Veterinarian Reminds Livestock & Pet Owners to Watch Out for Ticks

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-Press Release, NCDA&CS

State Veterinarian Doug Meckes is reminding livestock and pet owners to be vigilant in their tick preventative measures during warm weather. Recently, the deaths of five cows in Surry County were linked to acute anemia caused by tick infestations. Samples were sent to the N.C. Division of Public Health, Communicable Disease Branch for identification which confirmed Asian longhorned ticks.

“This is the fourth confirmed case in North Carolina since 2018, and the first case reported this year. Previous cases were found in Polk, Rutherford and Davidson counties,” Meckes said. “The deceased young bull brought to our Northwestern Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab had more than 1,000 ticks on it and the owner had lost four other cattle under the same circumstances.”

The Asian longhorned tick is an exotic, East Asian tick. The first case identified in the U.S. was in West Virginia from a tick taken from a white-tail deer in August 2010. Since then, 67 counties in the United States have confirmed local Asian longhorned tick populations. Virginia has the most counties with 24 confirmed.

It is a serious pest of livestock in its native regions, and the means of introduction into the U.S. is unknown. It is an aggressive biter and frequently builds intense infestations on animals causing great stress, reduced growth and production, and blood loss. The tick can reproduce parthenogenetically (without a male) and a single fed female tick can create a localized population.

While the Asian longhorned tick has not been linked to any human infection in the United States, the N.C. Division of Public Health, Communicable Disease Branch is working with NCDA&CS to understand its distribution and monitor for diseases it may carry.

The finding of this tick in the state corresponds with a continued effort by the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services to identify ticks in all 100 counties of the state. Veterinarians are encouraged to submit ticks they find on clinical patients to help track and identify tick populations in North Carolina. If you are a veterinarian practicing in North Carolina and are interested in participating in this study, email Dr. Alexis M. Barbarin at [email protected].

Ticks attack people, domestic animals and wildlife. Prevention remains the best method to deter tick-borne illnesses. Protect yourself while outdoors by wearing long clothing, wearing permethrin-treated clothing, and using DEET, picaridin, and other EPA-approved repellants. It is also good practice to shower immediately once you return home. Checking for ticks can help deter tick attachment or allow for early removal. For domestic animals, talk to your veterinarian about effective options to treat your pets and livestock for ticks.

Kinton Arrested on Stolen Vehicle, Drug-Related Charges

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-Press Release, Franklin County Sheriff’s Office

On July 3, 2019, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office Patrol Division, along with the assistance of the Community Action Team, arrested Robert Steven Kinton, age 22, a Franklin County resident.

After a traffic stop, Kinton was charged with Possess Stolen Motor Vehicle, Felony Flee/Elude Arrest with Motor Vehicle, Possess Heroin, Injury to Personal Property, Reckless Driving to Endanger, Resisting Public Officer, Possess Drug Paraphernalia, DWLR.

In addition, Kinton was served with an outstanding warrant for Provide Tobacco/Vapor Product to an Inmate.

Kinton was placed in the Franklin County Detention Center under a $105,000 secured bond.

On July 3, 2019, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office Patrol Division, along with the assistance of the Community Action Team, arrested Robert Steven Kinton, age 22, a Franklin County resident. After a traffic stop, Kinton was charged with Possess Stolen Motor Vehicle, Felony Flee/Elude Arrest with Motor Vehicle, Possess Heroin, Injury to Personal Property, Reckless Driving to Endanger, Resisting Public Officer, Possess Drug Paraphernalia, DWLR. (FCSO photo)

The ‘Few and the Proud’ Join Forces With the State to Combat Drunk Driving

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-Press Release, NCDOT

The Marine Corps Air Station New River played host Monday to the annual North Carolina Governor’s Highway Safety Program Statewide Fourth of July ‘Booze It & Lose it’ campaign, dubbed ‘Operation Firecracker.’ (PICTURES HERE)

Operation Firecracker aims to prevent alcohol-related crashes by targeting impaired drivers during the July 4 holiday season. The campaign runs July 1 through July 7, with law enforcement agencies running sobriety checkpoints in all 100 counties to help catch drunk drivers and reduce fatalities.

GHSP Director Mark Ezzell speaks at the 2019 ‘Operation Firecracker’ kickoff event in Jacksonville. (Photo courtesy NCDOT)

Monday’s kickoff was launched on the air station with educational activities and displays including:

  • Blood Alcohol Testing Mobile Unit: (BAT Mobile to be used for touring as well as an overnight check point in Onslow County);
  • Seatbelt Convincer: (an educational tool that allows riders to experience force, up to five times their body weight, similar to that of a 5-10 mph crash);
  • Golf Carts & Goggles: (drunk driving simulators); and a
  • Hot Car demonstrator.

Poised in front of a commanding MV-22 Osprey from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 263 (VMM-263), Lt. Col. Roger Holliday, director of Installations and Environment, MCAS New River, addressed a crowd of about 350 Marines, Sailors and civilians.

“This campaign is aimed at saving the lives of those who ensure all of our freedom by bringing a heightened sense of awareness about an issue that can plague military communities,” he said.

Military communities have one of the most susceptible populations to drinking and driving with the majority of the enlisted Marines and Sailors being males between the ages of 18 and 22.

N.C. Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell told the crowd, “It’s a time for us to fire up the barbecue, grab a seat for that spectacular fireworks display and hoist the flag, not lower it because someone we know died or was killed due to poor planning.”

“We need you to ‘improvise, adapt, and overcome’ and practice new techniques going forward,” Ezzell added. “Call a cab, call a buddy, take the bus or use ride-share services. These are four easy ways not to die after you’ve been drinking.”

Lance Cpl. Brandon Pena is a Marine with Headquarters & Headquarters Squadron, MCAS New River, whose career abruptly shifted in July of 2018.

“It was around this time last year that I was arrested right here on base for driving drunk,” he shared with the crowd. “I was drinking at a party and decided to drive myself home. I thought I knew ‘my limit’ but no one does.”

Base officials conducted a breathalyzer test and Pena blew almost twice the legal limit.

“My blood alcohol was 0.13. I was booked. I lost my license. I lost my rank. I lost respect. What I gained however, was a second chance at a law-abiding life. I could have killed myself that night or God forbid someone else. I still live my life as a Marine. I plan on celebrating this 4th of July, but I can tell you I won’t be drinking and driving,” Pena continued.

His message was simple as is the solution for celebrating safety this holiday and any other.

“Leave the keys at home. No one knows their own limit, and once you are drunk it’s too late.”

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by NCGHSP which supports, through funding, a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or TicketBikeSafe NCWatch For Me NCSpeed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

Franklin Co. Responds to Reports of Radiological Contaminants in Wells

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-Press Release, Franklin County Government

The Franklin County Health Department responded to the report of potential radionuclides in wells on November 19, 2018, in a presentation to the Franklin County Board of Commissioners containing information on how citizens could have testing conducted.

The Franklin Times published this information during that week and information and instructions were placed on the Franklin County Health Department website.

In the 2018 presentation, it was noted that concern in Franklin stemmed from revised North Carolina Geological Survey Maps which show the Rolesville Granite Formation extending into a greater portion of Franklin County than was previously outlined in prior maps. As a result, the potential exists for more wells to be affected by the aging of this granite-formation, which can lead to naturally increased radionuclides in ground water.

Recent media coverage of Wake County’s notification to its citizens has generated a number of questions from Franklin County residents. So, what is Franklin County’s risk? Health concerns associated with elevated radionuclides in drinking water generally require prolonged exposure at highly elevated levels (in most cases over a lifetime) to have ill effects.

If you consume water from a well in Franklin County, visit the Health Department’s Environmental Health website for more information at https://www.franklincountync.us/services/health/services/environmental-health. Use the links in red to the “Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)” document to learn more about whether your well should be tested (including a link to an interactive map for Radon), what test(s) to use, and any potential health risks.

The Health Department has developed a comprehensive bundled-package of well-water radiological tests ($225) as well as less expensive options based on your well’s particular needs.

For additional information, please call the county’s Environmental Health Services Program at 919-496-8100 or visit https://www.franklincountync.us/services/health.

Fireworks Caused 35 NC Wildfires in 2018; State Urges Caution

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-Press Release, NCDA&CS

Elevated wildfire risks due to abnormally dry conditions in Eastern North Carolina are prompting N.C. Forest Service officials to urge extreme caution with fireworks and to celebrate safely this Independence Day. Forecast chances for rain are slight at best and are unlikely in the southeastern counties for the next several days where warm temperatures will continue to raise the risk of wildfires.

“There were 35 wildfires sparked by fireworks in North Carolina in 2018 despite it being a very wet year,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “To reduce the risk of starting wildfires from fireworks during the upcoming holiday, we recommend enjoying professional fireworks shows rather than setting off personal fireworks if possible.”

Even small fireworks such as sparklers, fountains, glow worms, smoke devices, trick noisemakers and other Class C fireworks can be hazardous. For example, sparklers burn at temperatures above 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit. Glow worms burn directly on the ground near ignition sources.

Wildfires caused by fireworks can be prosecuted under the forest protection laws of North Carolina and individuals may be subject to reimbursing the costs for fire suppression.

If you choose to display your own fireworks, here are some safety tips to follow:

  • Don’t use fireworks such as ground spinners, firecrackers, round spinners, Roman candles, bottle rockets and mortars, which are illegal in North Carolina.
  • Do not use fireworks near dry vegetation or any combustible material.
  • Don’t aim fireworks at trees, bushes or hedges where dry leaves may ignite.
  • Make sure fireworks are always used with adult supervision.
  • Follow instructions provided with fireworks.
  • Do not use fireworks while under the influence of alcohol.
  • Have a rake or shovel and a water source nearby.
  • Ensure all burning material is completely extinguished afterwards and monitor the area for several hours.

“As the population in North Carolina continues to increase and more homes are built in wooded areas, it’s important for everyone to understand wildfire prevention,” said State Forester David Lane. “In addition to using fireworks safely, campfires or grills should never be left unattended.”

Campfire and grill ashes should be doused with water and stirred. Repeat this process to ensure ashes are cold. Place ashes in outside metal containers or bury them in mineral soil. Never put ashes in a paper bag, plastic bucket or other flammable container. Never store ashes in a garage, on a deck or in a wooded area. Double-check that ashes and coals are completely cold by feeling with the back of a bare hand before throwing them away to make sure a fire won’t start.

For more information, contact your local N.C. Forest Service office or visit www.ncforestservice.gov.

Franklin Co. Schools to Require Online Student Registration

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-Information courtesy Franklin County Schools

Beginning with the 2019-2020 academic year, all parents and guardians are required to complete student registration forms through Franklin County Schools’ new online system.

Parents will receive an email in mid-July with further details. Meal applications, as well as middle and high school technology fee forms, may also be completed through the online system.

If your email address is not on file with your child’s school, or if your email address needs to be updated, please contact the school’s administrative office. #FindOutFirst

Town Talk: Blue Collie Coffee Provides Job Opportunities for Disabled – 06/27/19

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Paige Sayles, co-owner of Blue Collie Coffee, was on Thursday’s edition of WIZS’ Town Talk program to discuss the nonprofit coffee shop.

Located at 106 N Main Street in Louisburg, the coffee shop provides employment opportunities for community members with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Blue Collie currently employs six local residents that have been with the shop since Sayles and husband Al first opened the store in May 2017.

“We started looking around, found a coffee shop that had been closed for two-and-a-half years, did the renovations, started hiring, went to coffee school…and here we are two years later,” said Sayles.

Featuring Hillsborough’s Joe Van Gogh Coffee, tea, baked goods and more, Sayles said the shop is proud to serve most of its offerings from NC-based business owners.

Hours of operation are Monday – Friday, 7:30 a.m. until 5 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.; closed on Sunday. The shop will be closed the week of July 4th and will reopen on Monday, July 8, 2019.

To hear the Town Talk interview with Paige Sayles in its entirety, including information on the Z.B. Collie Foundation, please click the play button below. Listen live to WIZS’ Town Talk Monday – Friday at 11 a.m. on 1450AM, 100.1 FM or online at www.wizs.com.

(This is not a paid advertisement)