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VGCC students awarded Golden LEAF scholarships

A group of VGCC students recently received scholarships through the Golden LEAF Scholarship program for the North Carolina Community College System. The scholarship program, designed to help North Carolinians attend the state’s community colleges, is funded through a $750,000 grant from the Golden LEAF Foundation.

The scholarship can be used to assist with tuition, books, fees, supplies, transportation and childcare expenses related to attending classes during the 2016-17 academic year, and industry-recognized credential testing expenses that address skill gaps upon course completion. Eligible students must demonstrate financial need and reside in rural counties that are tobacco-dependent and/or economically distressed. Scholarships for both occupational (continuing education) and curriculum students are available during the fall, spring and summer semesters.

The VGCC students who were awarded Golden LEAF scholarships for the fall 2016 semester (with their respective programs of study) include:

 

  • Sally Alston of Louisburg (Associate in Arts);
  • Jennifer Bauduin of Louisburg (Associate in General Education – General Science);
  • Sonia Bishop of Stem (Computer Technology Integration – Networking and Security Technologies);
  • Taylor Crisp of Warrenton (Associate Degree Nursing);
  • Catherine Demming of Oxford (Criminal Justice);
  • Emory Gant-Hawkins of Henderson (Business Administration);
  • Latosha Hunt of Oxford (Business Administration);
  • Quiana Miller-Fisher of Henderson (Human Services Technology); and
  • Kimberly Vargo of Oxford (Associate in Arts)

 

“The Golden LEAF Foundation is proud to have awarded over 11,800 Golden LEAF Scholarships to help North Carolinians attend our state’s community colleges,” said Dan Gerlach, Golden LEAF president. “Our hope is that these scholarships will help build the talent, knowledge and skills of our current and future workforce, which are in demand by industry, especially in the rural areas of our state.”

The Golden LEAF Foundation is a nonprofit organization established in 1999 to help transform North Carolina’s economy. The foundation receives one-half of North Carolina’s funds from the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement with cigarette manufacturers and places special emphasis on assisting tobacco-dependent, economically distressed and/or rural communities across the state. The Golden LEAF Foundation works in partnership with governmental entities, educational institutions, economic development organizations and nonprofits to achieve its mission. The foundation has awarded 1,346 grants totaling more than $591 million since its inception. For more information about the foundation, visit www.goldenleaf.org or call (888) 684-8404.

Students interested in applying for a Golden LEAF Scholarship should contact the VGCC Financial Aid Office at (252) 738-3280.

 

–VGCC–

Music Honor Society Launched at Oxford Preparatory School

The Tri-M® Music Honor Society, the honor society for secondary school music students, announces the chartering of a new chapter at Oxford Preparatory School in Oxford, North Carolina, under the leadership of Sarah Stallsmith. 27 students from grades 9-12 were inducted into the organization in a ceremony held at Salem United Methodist Church on January 25, 2017.

 

The formation of this chapter signifies the school’s recognition of the importance of the arts in the development of a comprehensive educational program. The Tri-M Music Honor Society provides a means of recognizing the efforts and achievements of music students who volunteer their time and share their musical talent with others. Since 1952, almost 5,000 Tri-M chapters have been chartered in the United States and abroad, and current membership exceeds 50,000.

 

The goal of the Tri-M Music Honor Society is to foster greater interest in band, orchestra, and choral performance and to provide more opportunities for personal musical expression. Students are selected for membership in the honor society on the basis of musicianship, scholarship, character, leadership, and service to their school and community. The organization’s high standards serve to challenge students to greater effort and achievement and to encourage them in the pursuit of excellence.

 

In 1983, the Tri-M Music Honor Society became a program of the National Association for Music Education (NAfME). ​National Association for Music Education, among the world’s largest arts education organizations, is the only association that addresses all aspects of music education. NAfME advocates at the local, state, and national levels; provides resources for teachers, parents, and administrators; hosts professional development events; and offers a variety of opportunities for students and teachers. The Association orchestrates success for millions of students nationwide and has supported music educators at all teaching levels for more than a century.

 

For more information about Tri-M or NAfME, visit the Web site at www.nafme.org/tri-m or call the NAfME office at 1-800-336-3768.

2016-17 Tri-M Music Honor Society​:
9th grade​:

Claire Gordon

Sophia Metcalf

Nathan Metcalf

Ronnie Murray

Morgan Nance

Maecy Ross
10th grade​:

Alex Bare

Hannah Brewer

Evelyn Hann

Sydney Landers

Maranda Mynatt

Camden Ross

Makayla Thompson

Jocelyn Williams
11th grade​:

Bailee Barker

Olivia Brown

Andrew Crumpler

Whitt Daniel

Kayla Green

Ca’rin Green

Katherine Redman

Catherine Stallsmith

Madeline Stallsmith

Christian West
12th grade​:

Noah Greenway

Aaron Lombard

Alyssa Ross

Dr. Howard Retires from role at Granville County Superintendent

After over 30 years of service, our Superintendent, Dr. Dorwin Howard has made the decision to retire.  Dr. Howard assumed the leadership role during a tumultuous time and must be commended for calming any concerns in our Granville County Public School system.  Now the school board is in the process of identifying candidates and hiring the next leader of our schools.  The school board is using a variety of communication methods to get your input.

This letter is merely a request of our residents to stay engaged, and to provide the school board with your input on this important search process.  You can do this in a variety of ways: complete the online survey on the school district website http://www.gcs.k12.nc.us/; or, obtain a paper copy at any of our schools; and/or, attend the Granville County School Board meeting on March 6 and share your comments.

Please keep in mind the deadline for this process is March 27.  The results of the survey and community input will be presented at the April 3 Board of Education meeting.

Selection of new leadership is crucial to moving our county forward.  We want your input.  Make your voice heard.

 

Sincerely,

The School Board Members of Granville County

VGCC names 258 students to President’s and Dean’s Lists

Vance-Granville Community College has announced that 126 students earned President’s List and 132 earned Dean’s List academic honors for the fall semester that ended in Dec. 2016.

The President’s List recognizes students who achieved a perfect 4.0 grade-point average (GPA) while carrying a “full load” (of at least 12 credit hours) in 100-level or higher curriculum courses. To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student had to earn a GPA that was at least 3.5 but less than 4.0, and have no grade lower than “B,” while carrying a “full load” of such courses.

Fall Semester President’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

Accounting:

Sarah J. Gabriel and Ciara S. Lynch, both of Franklinton;

Wannapha N. Robinson of Louisburg;

Elizabeth D. Elliott of Youngsville.

 

Associate Degree Nursing:

Madelaine L. Sachs of Henderson;

Renee Jackson of Kittrell.

 

Associate in Arts:

Samantha J. Shannon and Tamiya R. Thomas, both of Creedmoor;

Joshua Jacobs of Durham;

Ryan W. Sharp of Franklinton;

Cristin D. Abbott, Nancy C. Bonilla, Kourtney J. Cockrell, Ashlyn K. Collier, Chadstity V. Copeland, Caroline M. Oakley, Autumn G. Outlaw, Ebony S. Robinson Solomon and Janet Rodriguez-Morales, all of Henderson;

Leslie A. Leake of Kittrell;

Marshella D. Ashby and Makayla R. Williams, both of Littleton;

Loganne S. Driver, Blake A. Massengill and Joshua W. Moody, all of Louisburg;

Kristy R. Ball, Robin L. Hill and Sydney A. Towers, all of Oxford;

Amanda B. Miller of Warrenton;

Lindsay C. Henry of Youngsville.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Tyler A. Thorp of Henderson;

Rachel H. Allen of Stem.

 

Associate in Science:

Jordan S. Ligon of Bullock;

Michael T. O’Donoghue of Fredericksburg, Va.;

Lucas R. Hamrick and Elizabeth R. Twisdale, both of Henderson;

Sovanny Taylor of Louisburg;

Alana W. Towles of Oxford;

Skylar L. Davenport, Nicholas J. Didonna, III, and Joseph A. Moore, all of Youngsville.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Michael L. Wright of Durham;

Jeremy D. Lemay, Kenneth S. McConnell and Jacob F. Mosley, all of Henderson;

Jordan A. Alston of Louisburg;

Travis L. Keeton of Oxford;

Stephen B. Ray of Wake Forest.

 

Business Administration:

Korena L. Weichel of Creedmoor;

Roy A. Satterwhite of Henderson;

Stacy T. Hicks, Latosha C. Hunt, David L. Nicholson and Meghan J. Rossi, all of Oxford;

Jason L. Thompson of Stem.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Andrew S. Dawson of Henderson.

 

Computer Technology Integration – IT Support Track:

Tristin McClay of Creedmoor;

Max N. Moore, Jr., of Henderson.

 

Computer Technology Integration – Networking and Security Technologies Track:

Andrew A. Dadson of Butner;

Christina D. Manz of Creedmoor.

 

Computer Technology Integration – Web Design and Support Track:

Angelica M. Garcia-Avelar of Durham;

Rowan M. Morris of Warrenton.

 

Cosmetology:

Cassie A. Shaffer of Butner;

Christianne Combs of Durham;

Katrina W. Collie of Franklinton;

Micaela B. Crowder of Henderson;

Kristina M. Brantley and Kathryn L. Overby, both of Louisburg;

Kierra N. Richardson of Macon;

Myranda L. Carroll of Norlina.

 

Criminal Justice:

Christopher L. Davis of Bullock;

Martin A. Spencer of Creedmoor;

Monica A. Williams of Franklinton;

Andrew J. Shultz of Henderson;

Benjamin B. Layton of Kittrell;

Safwan A. Ali of Louisburg;

Chance S. Hayes of Louisburg;

Alissa J. Cheek of Wake Forest.

 

Culinary Arts:

Rebecca N. Groover of Franklinton;

Randy D. Bullock and Dejah Davis, both of Stem.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Kimberly C. Cagney of Creedmoor;

Bianca E. Garrett of Franklinton;

Jacquella S. Jones of Henderson;

Brooklyn E. Mason of Louisburg.

 

Electronics Engineering Technology:

George C. Williams of Louisburg.

 

Entrepreneurship:

Raeann Johnson of Henderson.

 

Global Logistics and Distribution Management Technology:

Charles Braswell of Raleigh.

 

Human Services Technology:

Fredesvinda C. Euceda-Col of Creedmoor.

 

Information Technology:

Andrew B. Benedict and Dustin L. Starnes, both of Henderson;

Cody R. Parrott of Kittrell;

Austin H. Smith of Oxford.

 

Mechatronics Engineering Technology:

Charles J. Nordcliff of Creedmoor;

Thomas K. Boyd of Henderson.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Cassidy B. Lucas of Franklinton;

Morrisha K. Alston, Tranita N. Brown and April B. Peoples, all of Henderson;

Beverly K. Ellis of Kittrell;

Kristie L. Brough of Oxford;

Amber S. Carey of Stem;

Rebecca T. George of Warrenton;

Julia A. Rhodes of Youngsville.

 

Office Administration:

Angela M. Hayes of Louisburg.

 

Paralegal Technology:

April M. Thompson of Henderson;

Holly H. Cashwell of Wake Forest;

Heather C. Bryant of Youngsville.

 

Pharmacy Technology:

Tommy L. Hicks of Franklinton.

 

Radiography:

Anna P. Tilley of Creedmoor;

Sabrina D. Johnson of Louisburg;

Kristel L. Dehart and Aaron J. McNeill, both of Oxford;

James A. Lea of Timberlake;

Jamisha D. Twitty of Warrenton.

 

Welding Technology:

Nicholas Keeton of Bullock;

Cedric J. Rodebaugh, II, of Franklinton;

Galen D. Wilds of Granville County;

Donnie S. Ayscue and Eduardo Ibarra-Renteria, both of Henderson;

Ethan T. Bailey, Christopher M. Kearney and Robert L. Mallory, all of Oxford;

David A. Jeanblanc of Raleigh;

Jared Q. Siemers of Wake Forest;

Andrew Lynam of Youngsville.

 

Fall Semester Dean’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

 

Accounting:

Holly A. Waddell of Henderson;

Jennifer M. Burton of Norlina.

 

Associate Degree Nursing:

Caitlin E. Moen of Cary;

Heather J. Floyd of Franklinton;

Rachel A. Edwards of Louisburg;

Talia M. Dyce and Sharon N. Ray, both of Oxford;

Sandra H. Enloe of Stem;

Brooke A. Hursey and Kayla D. Roberson, both of Wake Forest.

 

Associate Degree Nursing LPN to ADN Program:

Ashley B. Jones of Bullock.

 

Associate in Arts:

Kaleb S. Williamson of Bullock;

Tiffany Martinez of Butner;

Farrah B. Foster, Robert C. Hurt, Janella A. Mendivil and Owen T. Mettam, all of Creedmoor;

Poppy T. Boze, Rebekah H. Glasheen, Robert D. Osborne, Benjamin P. Taylor and Richard K. Washington, all of Franklinton;

Celene Acuna, Jasmine N. Allen, Anthony M. Henderson, Lynn M. Henderson, II, Alexandra J. Saravia, Brian J. Stevenson, Jakayla M. Thorpe and Bailee E. Tippett, all of Henderson;

Lillian D. Kanouff and Allie R. Beach, both of Kittrell;

Asia M. Green of Norlina;

Cecilia E. Barrenechea, Sonia M. Hernandez, Emely K. Ovando, Kimberly M. Spence and Thomas S. Thompson, all of Oxford;

Ashleigh V. Dannemiller of Raleigh;

Kamden E. Thompson of Stem;

Casey P. Hunter and Clay D. Walters, both of Wake Forest;

Sarah A. Boone of Warrenton.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Paige D. Snider of Creedmoor;

Taylor M. Moseley of Henderson;

Danny W. Ayscue of Kittrell;

Stormi M. Abernathy of Leasburg;

Megan I. Proctor of Macon;

Marina E. Rombout of Stem.

 

Associate in Science:

Lindsey R. Perry of Henderson;

Kia S. Brodie of Louisburg;

Sara A. Abdulla, Nicole F. Bowman, Zakaria I. Kassim and Francis C. Scotland, all of Oxford;

Micah C. Roberts of Stem;

Kellyann M. Cook of Stovall.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Blake A. Larcade of Oxford.

 

Bioprocess Technology:

Kimberly A. Prevette of Oxford.

 

Business Administration:

Andrew J. Cagney and Bobbie J. Wilkerson, both of Creedmoor;

Angela Burrell    and Alfredo Picaz, both of Henderson;

Mark A. Alston of Manson;

Jason D. Hester of Oxford;

Dar-Neshia S. Williams of Warrenton;

Ashley M. Kinton of Youngsville.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Steven J. Lynch of Norlina.

 

Computer Technology Integration – IT Support Track:

Quinton McDonald of Henderson.

 

Computer Technology Integration – Web Design and Support Track:

Amie E. Hilton of Oxford.

 

Cosmetology:

Jessica K. Lovegrove of Creedmoor;

Brittany D. Pickering of Durham;

Davis B. Moore of Franklinton;

Hannah C. Beckwith of Henderson;

Angela M. Alexander of Kittrell;

Melissa D. Sweeney of Louisburg;

Crystal L. Carrington, Loukita C. Meadows and Katy S. Perdomo, all of Oxford;

Jordan G. Reina of Roxboro;

Maria G. Ordonez Santiago of Warrenton;

Kristina F. Graham and Nancy H. Paduchowski, both of Youngsville.

 

Criminal Justice:

Tyler L. Hughes of Bullock;

Charmaine A. Sutton of Louisburg;

Dustin L. Hodnett and Harold T. Todd, both of Oxford;

Vickie A. Crawley of Roxboro.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Jessica R. Bolton and Makala West, both of Henderson;

Catherine G. Jones of Youngsville.

 

Entrepreneurship:

Austin R. Lovegrove of Franklinton.

 

Human Services Technology:

Sonya J. Barnes of Henderson.

 

Human Services Technology/Gerontology:

Larecia R. Bullock of Oxford.

 

Information Technology:

Mitchell L. Greene and Nathan E. Johnston, both of Creedmoor;

Brandon J. Carver of Durham;

Genifer R. Gibson of Fayetteville;

Kasey R. Owens of Henderson;

Kassidy L. Holtzman of Norlina;

Tina M. Kreidler and Alisha M. Prevette, both of Oxford;

Nathan L. Garrard of Stem.

 

Medical Assisting:

Dajane G. Johnson of Henderson.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Melanie Lugo-Nieves of Creedmoor;

Raven K. Kay and Raini Williams, both of Henderson;

Brianna N. Lynch of Hollister;

Misty R. Grabowski of Louisburg;

Tina M. Hatcher and Anthony M. Wade, both of Oxford;

Thomas M. King, Jr., of Wise.

 

Office Administration:

Mary A. Elberson of Henderson;

Mary Cox of Oxford.

 

Paralegal Technology:

Kelly D. Persinger of Louisburg;

Lindsay E. Brown of Oxford.

 

Radiography:

Ashley B. Storer of Creedmoor;

Trevor M. Houston of Durham;

Mary E. Brewer, Kelsey P. Hight, Kara Siena S. Reese and Madalyne N. Woods, all of Henderson;

Kaitlyn B. Sumner of Hurdle Mills;

Chelsea J. Flaxcomb of Kittrell;

Maricela Carbajal, Mary D. Currin and Jonathan T. Liddane, all of Oxford;

Jaime L. Wilson of Raleigh;

Morgan H. Keith of Stem.

 

Welding Technology:

Hernan J. Hernandez of Castalia;

Eric L. Clayton and Keodric D. Grant, both of Oxford.

 

–VGCC–

Granville Chamber Announces Alive After 5 Dates

News Release

Granville County Chamber of Commerce

February 14, 2017

919-693-6125 – [email protected]

Release: Immediately

The Board of Directors of the Granville County Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce the dates, locations and bands for their  three 2017 events.

Beginning May 11th in downtown Oxford’s parking lot between Main and Gilliam Streets, the first Alive After Five will feature “The Castaways” Band.

On Thursday, August 10th, “The Konnection Band” will be entertainers for the Creedmoor event, which will be held in downtown Creedmoor.

Completing the season will be “The Embers” Band on Thursday, September 21st in Oxford.  All events are held from 5:30 until 8:30 pm.

This is the fourteenth year that the Granville Chamber has organized Alive After Five events for the public.  In 2004 there was one Alive After Five in September.  The following year, there were two held – May and September.  Since 2005, the May and September events have been held in Oxford, and the August event has rotated between Butner and Creedmoor.

The continued sponsorships of local businesses and industries enable the Chamber to provide these community oriented gatherings.  Event volunteers are also appreciated.

Anyone interested in sponsoring or volunteering should contact either of the Chamber’s offices – 919-693-6125 or 919- 528-4994 – [email protected] or [email protected].

NCDOL Warns Employers of Poster Scam

NEWS RELEASE

Release: Immediate

Contact: Jason Tyson

Date: Feb. 9, 2017

Phone: 919-715-3233

 

Raleigh—The N.C. Department of Labor is urging businesses across the state to be on the lookout for suspicious correspondence, after the department recently received multiple reports of persons using scare tactics or threatening language in an attempt to sell labor law posters to employers.

“These scams surface several times a year and businesses will contact us,” Labor Commissioner Cherie Berry said. “The threats of fines are bogus and should be ignored. The Department of Labor provides free sets of labor law posters to businesses.”

The scammers will often pose as either government officials or as acting on behalf of a poster company, such as the North Carolina Labor Law Poster Service, a non-regulatory entity that does not operate under any government agency. Other names these companies are known to go by include Personnel Concepts and Labor Law Compliance. There have been reports of these companies threatening fines from $7,000 to as much as $17,000 for non-compliance. Mailings can often appear to be from an official source and request fees for posters that cost anywhere from $84 to $200. Businesses should be aware that scammers may also attempt to contact them by either email, text or by phone.

While labor law posters are required to be displayed at a workplace by law, NCDOL inspectors carry the most up-to-date versions of the posters in their vehicles and will distribute them free of charge. The N.C. Department of Labor will never fine a business that has older versions of the poster displayed.

The NCDOL will print new versions anytime a significant law is changed or updated by Congress. Businesses are not required to order a new poster each time a change is made.  Employers that wish to order new posters can visit www.nclabor.com/posters/posters.htm or can call 1-800-625-2267.

# # #

GCPS School Board Seeks Public Input on Superintendent Search

Press Release

Granville County Board of Education

February 7, 2017

The Granville County Board of Education has hired the North Carolina School Boards Association (NCSBA) to help facilitate its search for the next Superintendent of Granville County Public Schools (GCPS). To that end, the board is seeking direct input from interested members of the staff and community to help shape the search process and assist in defining the qualities and characteristics of the next GCPS superintendent.

The board invites parents and community members to participate in a short community survey that can be accessed and completed online by clicking the survey link on the main GCPS webpage: http://www.gcs.k12.nc.us/. All surveys must be completed by Monday, March 27, 2017 with results to be compiled, summarized, and presented by NCSBA at the regular board meeting on April 3, 2017.

In addition, all employees of GCPS will have an opportunity to complete a separate online staff survey. Details about completing the employee version of the search survey will be communicated via school system email.

Citizens may also sign up to address the board during the public comment period at any of the upcoming regular board meetings, scheduled for 6:00 p.m. on March 6 and April 3. All meetings will be held in the main board room at the GCPS Administrative Offices, located at 101 Delacroix Street, Oxford, NC. Citizens must sign up to speak before the meeting begins and must otherwise comply with board policy.

In addition to input received from the surveys and public comment, written statements from any local groups or organizations may be submitted to Allison Schafer via mail at NCSBA, P.O. Box 97877, Raleigh, NC 27624, via email at [email protected], or via fax at 919-841-4020. These statements should be received no later than Monday, March 27, 2017.

###

Stan Winborne, Ed.S.
Director of High Schools
Director of Career & Technical Education Program
Public Information Officer
Granville County Schools

City of Oxford to hold Personnel Committee Meeting

CITY OF OXFORD

FEBRUARY 9, 2017

PERSONNEL COMMITTEE MEETING

The Personnel Committee for the City of Oxford will meet on Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 10:00 AM in the Training Room, 1st Floor, City Hall, 300 Williamsboro Street.  The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the hiring process, code enforcement position, career development and personnel policy.  All those interested are encouraged to attend.

 

Barb Rote, CMC

City Clerk,

City of Oxford

300 Williamsboro Street – PO Box 1307

Oxford, North Carolina  27565

Butterfield Re-Introduces Childhood Cancer STAR Act

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Last week, Congressman G. K. Butterfield (D-NC), along with Congressman Michael McCaul (R-TX), Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), Congresswoman Jackie Speier (D-CA), Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV), Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Congressman Mike Kelly (R-PA), and Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA), re-introduced the Childhood Cancer STAR (Survivorship, Treatment, Access, and Research) Act, HR 820, in the 115th Congress.

The STAR Act would improve efforts to identify and track childhood cancer incidences, improve the quality of life for childhood cancer survivors, and identify opportunities to expand the research of therapeutics necessary to treat the approx. 15,700 children diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. every year.

Congressman Butterfield: “Childhood cancer remains the leading cause of death in American children and we need to take action. The Childhood Cancer STAR Act aims to give young cancer patients and their families better access to life-saving treatments and the support they need even after beating cancer.  I thank my colleagues for their continued partnership on this measure.  No parent should have to lose a child to cancer.  This Act moves us one step closer to seeing that it does not happen.”

Congressman McCaul: “I co-founded the Childhood Cancer Caucus because we need to do more in the fight against the number one killer of our children.  When I was in elementary school, my friend lost his battle to this illness, and this tragedy continues to be a far too frequent occurrence for children across the nation.  That is why we need to move legislation like the STAR Act through Congress this year, and prevent the worst outcomes from becoming a reality.”

Senator Reed: “With far too many children’s lives tragically cut short by cancer, it’s critical that we do all we can to help the brave young people who are fighting these battles.  The Childhood Cancer STAR Act will bring needed assistance to children with cancer and their families by expanding opportunities for research on childhood cancer and providing new strategies to help survivors overcome late health effects, such as secondary cancers.  It is my hope that these efforts will lead to life-saving treatments for children and bring us closer to our ultimate goal of ending pediatric cancer once and for all.”

Congresswoman Speier: “Childhood cancer is a nightmare for children and their families. And for many of these children, the fight does not end with remission,” Rep. Speier said. “That is why I’m proud to reintroduce the STAR Act and fight for its immediate passage in order to address the care and quality of life of the population of childhood cancer survivors, which is expected to reach 500,000 by the year 2020. The joyful news of remission should never be ruined by the serious threat of financial and emotional turmoil due to the on-going medical needs of these incredibly brave survivors.”

Senator Capito: “We must continue making advancements that can help save the lives of those battling childhood cancers. The Childhood Cancer STAR Act will contribute to new developments in research and treatment, and has the potential to positively impact tens of thousands of lives. I’m proud to reintroduce this very important legislation for patients and families in West Virginia and across the country.”

Senator Van Hollen: “There are unique barriers to studying childhood cancer that are slowing and preventing the next big breakthrough in treatment.  We need a strategy to give every child with cancer the hope of a long and healthy life, and the STAR Act is a bipartisan approach to delivering that hope. By taking action to better study this disease and improve the quality of life for survivors, this bill will ultimately save lives and get us closer to the day that no child has to face the diagnosis of cancer.”

Congressman Kelly: “No parent should ever have to hear the words, ‘Your child has cancer.’ I am so grateful to my colleagues on both sides of the aisle for coming together to introduce this crucial legislation to help make that dream a reality. The STAR Act will be a powerful tool in the fight to eradicate childhood cancer forever, and an ally to the survivors who have bravely fought and beat this disease.”

Senator Isakson: “It is extremely important that we increase research and treatment of the devastating effects of childhood cancer.  This critical legislation is a positive step forward to help find the right cures for our youngest patients.”

Background:

The STAR Act passed the U.S. House in the 114th Congress.

http://butterfield.house.gov

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Boys and Girls Club fundraiser brings a taste of New Orleans to Granville County

OXFORD – Mardi Gras festivities begin a few days early in Granville County this year when a local venue transforms into a New Orleans-style party spot.

The inaugural Mardi Gras Bash, set for Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017, is a fundraiser to benefit the Granville Unit of the Boys and Girls Club. Event organizers, most of them members of the local club’s advisory committee, say they expect this to become an annual “signature” event for the community.

“We are excited for the community and for the club,” said Irene Nichols, a member of the planning committee. “When you step through those doors, you’re going to feel like you are right down on Bourbon Street,” she said.

The fundraiser will be held at Thorndale Oaks in Oxford. “Thorndale Oaks is such a beautiful spot,” said Jackie Sergent, another committee member. “We are delighted to be able to have our event there,” Sergent said. Thorndale’s chef has created a New Orleans-inspired menu for the occasion. The event is from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., with special recognitions and other activities during the evening. Music will be provided by DJ Jay.

Boys and Girls Club members are creating and decorating Mardi Gras masks for the occasion, which will be available for purchase at the event. Local artist Linda Edwards will lead a workshop at the club to help the children create the masks in colorful Mardi Gras fashion.

The local club is in its fourth year of operation in Oxford. It is part of the North Central North Carolina region, which operates clubs in Granville, Vance, Franklin, Warren and Halifax counties. Each local club has an advisory committee which is responsible for local fundraising annually. The club began at Mary Potter Middle School, but soon needed extra space. Elementary school-aged club members spent part of the afternoons at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church. Then the BGCNCNC accepted building space, formerly used by  Santa Fe Natural Tobacco. The club officially moved to its new spot in summer 2016.

“This is what true community collaboration is all about,” said Laura Gabel, a local advisory committee member. “We got help from the schools and from a local church when we needed it most,” she said. Advisory committee Chairman Xavier Wortham agrees. “This community identified a need for a Boys and Girls Club,” he said, “and now we need to make sure that this community continues to support everything that the club provides.”

Tickets are $50 a person and are available in downtown Oxford at Stovall’s Gifts, Java Dave’s Cafe, Harvest restaurant and The Purple Bird. Tickets also are available from BGC  advisory committee members and online at bgcncnc.com.

For more information, contact Resource Development Director Mary Ann Avery at the BGC corporate office, 919.690.0036.

 

Mary Ann Avery

Resource Development Director

BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF NORTH CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA