Warren County Offers Safety Workshop For Spanish Speaking Farmworkers

The Warren County Extension Service is sponsoring a safety workshop for farmworkers who are Spanish speakers.

The workshop, Spanish Safety Training for Farmworkers, will take place Tuesday, May 28 at 1 p.m. at the Warren County Extension Center 158 Rafters Lane, Warrenton. The workshop is open to all; workers don’t have to work just in Warren County.

The training will be conducted in Spanish and will include information about worker protection standards, green tobacco sickness, heat stress and CPR.

For more information contact Matthew Place at 919.496.3344.

Red Cross: Take A Minute Now To Prepare For Hurricane Season That Runs June-November

– Information courtesy of the American Red Cross

The week of May 5-11 is National Hurricane Preparedness Week and disaster relief agencies like the American Red Cross encourage residents to take a few minutes now to get ready before the hurricane season blows in. The Atlantic hurricane season is June 1 through November 30, but it’s never too early to be thinking about how to prepare to weather a storm and its aftermath.

“The American Red Cross is taking this year’s forecast for an above average hurricane season very seriously,” said Allison Taylor, Regional CEO of Humanitarian Services, Red Cross North Carolina region. “The American Red Cross works closely with local, state, and federal officials, along with partner community organizations, to respond to disasters and meet basic emergency needs before, during, and after disasters. With our disaster volunteers and partners ready to meet the needs of our communities, the North Carolina Region is ready to respond this season.”

Early forecasts indicate there could be a near-record number of storms this year and experts even warn that the first named storm could form before the season begins. They are calling for as many as 25 named storms with up to a half dozen having a direct impact on the U.S.

“We encourage everyone to take time now to get ready for potential disasters this spring and summer,” said Taylor. “You can do so by updating your emergency supply kit, building a plan, and staying informed of weather risks in your area.”

If you live in areas prone to hurricanes, now is the perfect time to get prepared. Here are some simple steps you can take to be prepared:

  1. Create an evacuation plan. Plan what to do in case you are separated from your family during an emergency and if you have to evacuate. Coordinate your plan with your child’s school, your work and your community’s emergency plans. Plan multiple routes to local shelters, register family members with special medical needs as required and make plans for pets. If you already have an emergency plan, update it and review with household members so everyone knows what to do if an emergency occurs.
  2. Build an emergency kit with a gallon of water per person, per day, non-perishable food, a flashlight, battery-powered radio, first aid kit, medications, supplies for an infant and pets if applicable, a multi-purpose tool, personal hygiene items, copies of important papers, cell phone chargers, extra cash, blankets, maps of the area and emergency contact information. If you already have a disaster kit, make sure the food and water is still okay to consume and that copies of important documents are up to date.
  3. Be informed. Find out how local officials will contact you during a disaster and how you will get important information, such as evacuation orders.

Download the free Red Cross First Aid app so you’ll know what to do if emergency help is delayed and the free Emergency app for weather alerts, open Red Cross shelter locations and safety steps for different emergencies. Choose whether you want to view the content in English or Spanish with an easy-to-find language selector. Find these and all of the Red Cross apps in smartphone app stores by searching for the American Red Cross or going to redcross.org/apps.

In addition to taking these preparedness steps, we also have important safety information available for you on hurricanes.

Equines Need Annual Vaccines To Prevent Mosquito-Borne Diseases

-information courtesy of the N.C. Department of Agriculture

Horse, donkey and mule owners, it’s time to get your animals vaccinated against Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis and West Nile Virus.

“Mosquito-breeding season in North Carolina lasts from spring until the first frost and horses are at risk if not properly vaccinated,” said N.C. Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “EEE is fatal 90 percent of the time in horses and WNV has a fatality rate of 30 percent. However, both diseases are preventable by vaccination.”

So far this year we have had no cases of EEE or WNV, but last year there were seven cases of EEE, Troxler added.

State Veterinarian Dr. Mike Martin recommends that equine owners talk to their veterinarians about an effective vaccination protocol to protect horses from mosquito-borne diseases. The combination vaccination initially requires multiple injections for horses, mules and donkeys that have no prior vaccination history.

Mosquitoes can breed in any puddle that lasts for more than four days, so removing any source of standing water can reduce the chance of exposing animals to WNV or EEE. Keeping horses in stalls at night, using insect screens and fans, and turning off lights after dusk can also help reduce exposure to mosquitoes. Insect repellants can be effective if used according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Symptoms of EEE include impaired vision, aimless wandering, head pressing, circling, inability to swallow, irregular staggering gait, paralysis, convulsions and death. Once a horse has been bitten by an infected mosquito, it may take three to 10 days for symptoms to appear.

Symptoms of WNV include fever, weakness or paralysis of hind limbs, impaired vision, head pressing, seizures and aimless wandering.

People, horses and birds can become infected from a bite by a mosquito carrying these diseases, but there is no evidence that horses can transmit the viruses to other horses, birds or people through direct contact.

Equine care also includes keeping up to date on equine infectious anemia (EIA) testing, commonly referred to as the Coggins test. “Since January there have been three cases of EIA in North Carolina. There is no vaccine and no cure for this disease so testing annually is important,” Troxler added.

“It’s also a great time to make sure your animal is current on its rabies vaccination,” Troxler said. “So far this year we have had two positive cases of rabies in livestock. All livestock are naturally curious animals, which puts them at risk for a bite if a rabid animal gets through their fence line.”

TownTalk: Pink With A Passion Holds Cancer Survivor Walk This Saturday

The third “Pink With A Passion” Walk will be held Saturday, Apr. 20 at the Warren County Recreation Complex on U.S. 158 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Organizers Amena Wilson and Elaine Tunstall-Smith invite the community to come out to the event to celebrate cancer survivors and to support others who may be facing their own battles with the disease.

When Wilson faced her own breast cancer diagnosis in 2017, she wanted to do something positive to show her appreciation for the support she had received – a way to embrace the “pay it forward” attitude.

So she organized a walk. Now, in year three, Wilson and others have joined forces to create a day filled with healthy activities, food trucks, music and more – even a mammogram bus that will offer free mammograms.

“We are a breast cancer organization, but we serve all types of cancer,” Wilson said. This year’s theme is “We’re Stronger Together and Better In Unity.”

“We’re looking forward to joining the community…trying to (boost) awareness for healthy living,” said Tunstall-Smith. “It’s our way of giving back.”

Tunstall-Smith said she and Wilson have been friends and classmates, so she was quick to volunteer when Pink With A Passion was formed. “I felt so fulfilled,” she said, of that volunteer experience, “I felt like I was doing something for the community, my church, my God.” That’s when she jumped in with both feet.

Pink With A Passion “is about people and how we can be of assistance to people in a medical crisis,” Tunstall-Smith continued.

Wilson said the organization will make a $2,000 donation to Maria Parham Health’s Cancer Center, which will, in turn, share with cancer patients who need help to pay for gas to get to treatments, medicine and more while they are receiving care.

The reason for the event is a serious one – cancer and its effects on families and caregivers – but Saturday’s walk will provide a chance for celebration and community fellowship as well.

Tunstall-Smith said she hoped to see a good turnout to the event – bring your lawn chairs and expect to have an enjoyable day among friends and supporters.

Pink With A Passion has developed a reputation for being a support system for cancer patients, who need only to call on one of the volunteers if they need help with anything from getting a prosthesis to a ride to the doctor, Tunstall-Smith said – any type of assistance “to let them feel they are not in the battle by themselves.”

Come for the camaraderie, come for the information, come for the exercise by taking a few laps around the track or come for the giveaways, Wilson said. Just come out to show support for those who are battling cancer themselves, or who are caring for a loved one with cancer.

CLICK PLAY!

 

Warren Parks And Rec Mini-Grants Due April 30

The Warren County Parks and Recreation Department and the Parks and Recreation Commission are offering a mini-grant application process to support community partners to facilitate the development and support recreation amenities for Warren County residents at satellite locations. Recipients must be non-profit organizations located within Warren County.

The grant application is available on the Warren County Parks and Recreation website or obtain a physical copy from the Parks and Recreation Department at 113 Wilcox St., Warrenton, NC 27589.

All applications must be submitted and received by 5 p.m. April 30. Submitted requests may not exceed $10,000.

Applications can be submitted by email, in person or by mail.

  • Email: bonniefitz@warrencountync.gov
  • In person: Warren County Parks and Recreation Office at 113 Wilcox St., Warrenton, NC 27589 (not a mailing address)
  • Mail: Warren County Parks and Recreation, Attn: Bonnie Fitz, P.O. Box 835, Warrenton, NC 27589

For more information, contact Bonnie Fitz, Parks and Recreation Director at 252.257.2272 or parksandrecreation@warrencountync.gov.

 

4-H Dairy Program Interest Meeting April 25 For Warren, Franklin Youth

A 4-H Dairy Program interest meeting is scheduled for Thursday, Apr. 25 at the Franklin County Cooperative Extension office, 103 S. Bickett Blvd. in Louisburg.

Youngsters and their parents who want to learn more about the project are welcome to attend and get answers to questions they may have.

The program spans eight weeks, during which participants will have the chance to learn about dairy calves as they prepare for a local livestock show. In addition to learning about livestock handling, the youth will learn problem solving, effective communication and public speaking, record keeping, teamwork and more.

Contact the Franklin County Center at 919.496.3344 to learn more or email local agents Matthew_Place@ncsu.edu, Meg_Wyatt@ncsu.edu or Martha_Mobley@ncsu.edu

Register at https://go.ncsu.edu/franklin-warren-4h-youth-dairy-interest-mtg

Warren County Health Fair April 5

The Warren County Health Department will hold its annual Health Fair on Friday, Apr. 5, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 at the Lion’s Den (fairgrounds) in Warrenton. In case of rain or other inclement weather, the event will be held at the Warren County Armory Civic Center. 

This year’s health fair will feature several exhibitors and food vendors, according to Crystal Smith, interim Warren County manager. Exhibitors include Halifax-Warren Smart Start, N.C. Cooperative Extension Service, Warren County Emergency Medical Services, Warren County Emergency Services, Hope Regional Medical Center, Warren County Memorial Library, On Target Preparedness, Warren Hills, Elite, Therapeutics Alternatives, Henderson Fire Department, N.C. Forestry Services and Trillium Health Resources.

Local food trucks on site are Moots Mobile, The Wandering Dawg, Wing Master E. & Trinity Eats, Sims & Sims and Big Red’s. 

The health fair is designed to provide information about local programs/services, health screenings, food and fun activities for the entire family. The health fair is part of a week-long celebration to observe National Public Health Week. For questions about the health fair, please call the Warren County Health Department at 252.257.1185.

NCDMV Employs Online Tools To Tackle Customer No-Shows

– Information courtesy of NCDMV

To combat folks not showing up for their scheduled appointments at driver license offices, the N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles is now requiring new appointments to be confirmed.

In the month of February, 33.5 percent of appointments were no-shows, according to NCDMV officials.

“This confirmation process is necessary to address the high no-show rate for appointments we have been experiencing in our driver license offices,” said DMV Commissioner Wayne Goodwin.

Now, when appointments are reserved online at SkipTheLine.ncdot.gov, customers will receive a text message and email with a confirmation link and they will need to confirm their appointment by clicking either link within 15 minutes, or the appointment will be canceled. Upon confirming their appointment, customers will receive a text and email notification letting them know the appointment was successfully confirmed.

Four days before the appointment, customers will receive a reminder text and email with a confirmation link. Within 24 hours, customers will need to again confirm their appointment. Once confirmed, another email and text will be generated confirming the appointment.

For appointments booked less than four days out, the second confirmation link will not be sent.

“Folks are used to having to confirm their medical and other appointments in this way,”  Goodwin said, “so we’re applying this standard from the private sector to our business model and expecting good results and increased appointment availability.”

A handful of self-service kiosks have opened up in grocery stores in Raleigh, Charlotte and Fayetteville that allows for a variety of DMV transactions. There are additional online tools Walk-In Wait Time Tool and Q-Anywhere to cut down on customers’ wait time in DMV offices.

Warren Parks And Rec Mini-Grant Applications Due By April 30

The Warren County Parks and Recreation Department and the Parks and Recreation Commission are offering a mini-grant application process to support community partners to facilitate the development and support recreation amenities for Warren County residents at satellite locations. Recipients must be non-profit organizations located within Warren County.

The grant application is available on the Warren County Parks and Recreation website or obtain a physical copy from the Parks and Recreation Department at 113 Wilcox St., Warrenton, NC 27589.

All applications must be submitted and received by 5 p.m. April 30. Submitted requests may not exceed $10,000.

Applications can be submitted by email, in person or by mail.

  • Email: bonniefitz@warrencountync.gov OR
  • In person: Warren County Parks and Recreation Office at 113 Wilcox St., Warrenton, NC 27589 (not a mailing address) OR
  • Mail: Warren County Parks and Recreation, Attn: Bonnie Fitz, P.O. Box 835, Warrenton, NC 27589

For more information, contact Bonnie Fitz, Parks and Recreation Director at 252.257.2272 or parksandrecreation@warrencountync.gov.

 

 

Mar. 7 Is Social Security Administration’s “Slam The Scam” Day

Today is the fifth annual “Slam the Scam” observance to raise awareness about protecting sensitive Social Security information from fraudsters.

The Social Security Administration and its Office of the Inspector General (OIG) are partnering once again to raise public awareness about Social Security imposter scams.

“As public servants, we must use every tool at our disposal to raise awareness and protect the American people against Social Security imposter scams,” said Martin O’Malley, Commissioner of Social Security. “Scammers use fear and deception to scare people out of their critical benefits. We urge everyone to protect their personal information, remain vigilant, do not give money, and report any scam attempts to oig.ssa.gov.”

Keep in mind that Social Security employees will never:

  • tell you that your Social Security number is suspended
  • contact you to demand an immediate payment
  • threaten you with arrest
  • ask for your credit or debit card numbers over the phone
  • request gift cards or cash
  • promise a Social Security benefit approval or increase in exchange for information or money

Social Security employees do contact the public by telephone for business purposes. Ordinarily, the agency calls people who have recently applied for a Social Security benefit, are already receiving payments and require an update to their record, or who have requested a phone call from the agency. If there is a problem with a person’s Social Security number or record, Social Security will typically mail a letter.

Social Security scams–where fraudsters mislead victims into making cash, gift card, or wire transfer payments to fix alleged Social Security number problems or to avoid arrest–are an ongoing government imposter fraud scheme. Social Security impersonation scams have been one of the most common government imposter scams reported to the Federal Trade Commission. Social Security continues to make concerted efforts to address this issue, through extensive outreach and investigative initiatives.

Criminals use sophisticated tactics to trick potential victims into disclosing personal and financial information. Typically, they use these P’s – Pretend, Prize or Problem, Pressure, and Payment. For example, scammers pretend they are from Social Security in phone calls, texts, emails, and direct messages on social media, and claim there is a problem with the person’s Social Security number. The scammer’s caller ID may be spoofed to look like a legitimate government number. Scammers may also send fake documents to pressure people into complying with demands for information or money. Other common tactics include citing “badge numbers,” using fraudulent Social Security letterhead, and creating imposter social media pages to target individuals for payment or personal information.

To report a scam attempt, go to oig.ssa.gov.

“On our fifth National Slam the Scam Day, we are just as committed as we were in 2020. The scammers have not stopped, and we will not stop in our commitment to increase public awareness of these pervasive scams,” said Gail S. Ennis, Inspector General for SSA. “We are grateful for the many partnerships we have formed over the last five years in support of this initiative and the collaborative efforts that have come forth. We must continue to work together to slam the scam.”

For more information, please visit www.ssa.gov/scam and www.ssa.gov/fraud.