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L.B. Yancey Wins School of the Year

L.B. Yancey Elementary School won the “School of the Year” award presented at the end of the school system’s Convocation for all employees at McGregor Hall in Henderson on August 17.

 

Superintendent Anthony Jackson presented the award to Dr. Carnetta Thomas, principal of L.B. Yancey.

 

The school captured the honor for its outstanding year in student achievements, positive school climate, cooperation and cohesion of the school staff members and involvement in its community.

 

Thomas holds the award and is joined by school staff members in the photo.

Pinkston Street Elementary staff take home VCS Spirit Award

 

Pinkston Street Elementary staff members won the “Spirit Award” for Vance County Schools at the district’s Convocation for all employees on August 17.

 

Staff members were recognized as recipients of the award after their fantastic job in showing great school spirit as they were introduced at the Convocation in McGregor Hall.

 

All staff members wore “Pinkston Street Army” t-shirts, completed in Army green with gold lettering, and joined in a rousing cheer to show they are ready to begin the 2017-2018 school year.

 

They were led by Principal Heddie Somerville and Assistant Principal Jacqueline Crosson. They are shown in the photo, from left, with Principal Carnetta Thomas of L.B. Yancey Elementary School.

 

Superintendent Anthony Jackson presented Somerville with the large “VCS Spirit Award” pencil that is given to the school displaying the best school spirit at the event.

 

Staff members at Eaton-Johnson Middle School and Henderson Middle School, finished second and third, respectively, in the judging for the “VCS Spirit Award.”

VGCC schedules Sewing class at Main Campus

Vance-Granville Community College will soon offer a “Beginning Sewing” class on the college’s Main Campus in Vance County. The course, taught by Carol Montague of Oxford, is scheduled to be held on Monday evenings from 6-9 p.m., Sept. 11 through Nov. 27, in room 5203 (Building 5).

Sewing has always been a part of Carol Montague’s life. From the time she was very young, she remembers taking naps under her father’s work table. He was a canvas awning maker, cutting and sewing his work on a large, room-sized table. In 2002, she opened her business, called Hen and Chicks Sewing School. Both adults and children have benefitted from her classes, taught at her home and at the Oxford Housing Authority. She has also held numerous fashion shows at assisted living facilities, churches, her home, and the Oxford Housing Authority. Montague enjoys having her students give back to the community by donating hand-made items to the Durham Ronald McDonald House, making dresses for children for Haiti and comfort caps for cancer patients.

Montague believes in equipping the current generation with skills that have become too often ignored. “The value of sewing for yourself and others comes in many forms,” she said. “Unique and personalized gifts, clothing alteration, hard-to-find modest clothing, wearability, and one-of-a-kind clothing and crafts are just a few of the many advantages of learning to sew.”

Sewing is a life-skill, she added. “Adults learn drafting design skills by making or adjusting their own patterns, cutting skills, the value of precision work and how to combine color,” Montague said. “Students will be able to identify quality craftsmanship in ready-to-wear garments and spot hastily-made clothing fashioned out of cheap materials. They will be able to repair purchased items that need ‘fixing.’ Many have made a business out of the skill of sewing.”

The cost of the class is $80. Students will need to provide their own materials, a list of which will be provided. The deadline to register is Sept. 4.

Registration can be completed online at www.vgcc.edu/schedules/personal-enrichment or at any VGCC campus. For more information, contact Gail Clark at (252) 738-3385 or [email protected].

–VGCC–

VGCC ranked in top 20 online colleges in North Carolina

A national organization has recognized Vance-Granville Community College as one of the top 20 colleges in North Carolina offering online programs. California-based OnlineColleges.com ranked VGCC 19th on a list that included both two-year and four-year institutions of higher learning. Among just the two-year colleges, VGCC ranked tenth-highest.

“Focusing on affordability, student services, and the availability of online programs, we used the most recent government data to evaluate colleges and universities across the country,” said OnlineColleges.com representative Kelly Rivett of the way in which her organization ranks institutions. The website reported that 52.9% of VGCC students took some or all of their courses online, according to data collected in 2015.

OnlineColleges.com is a resource for people who want reliable information about online colleges and degree programs. Its stated mission is “to empower students with knowledge about distance education.” Interactive tools on the website allow students to filter close to 3,000 colleges by state, tuition, school type, military benefits and religious affiliation.

VGCC has expanded its online course offerings in recent years. In 2015, the college launched the VOLT (Vanguard Online Learning through Technology) initiative, primarily with working adults in mind. Through VOLT, six two-year degree programs are now offered 100-percent online — Associate in Arts and Associate in Science (both also known as “College Transfer”), Business Administration, Criminal Justice, Medical Office Administration – Coding Specialist, and Supply Chain Management. In addition, students can take online courses in combination with traditional face-to-face courses to complete any VGCC degree program.

A number of 12-week online classes will begin on Sept. 12. For more information on enrollment, call VGCC at (252) 738-3330 or visit www.vgcc.edu.

–VGCC–

VGCC students inducted into NC A&T Nursing partnership program

GREENSBORO — Eleven Vance-Granville Community College students were formally inducted into the North Carolina Piedmont “Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses” (RIBN) program in a ceremony on Aug. 4 at North Carolina A&T State University’s Union Square Campus in Greensboro. RIBN is a partnership involving the university, VGCC, Davidson County Community College and Guilford Technical Community College.

At the induction ceremony, the A&T School of Nursing welcomed students from VGCC and the other community colleges who will be simultaneously enrolled at the university. RIBN students earn associate’s degrees in nursing over three years (while also taking A&T courses online) and then continue for one year of additional courses at A&T required for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree.

This year’s inductees from VGCC included Caliegh Katz and Sarah Riley, both of Creedmoor; Chiatyra Turner of Ebony, Va.; Henrry Reboccar-Miguel and Alexis Williams, both of Franklinton; Nigoria Alston and Dawson Peoples, both of Henderson; Rachel Spall of Kittrell; Jessica Morris of Oxford; Kati Hand of Wilton; and Joshua Miller of Zebulon.

Erica Jastrow, the Nursing department chair for VGCC, pinned a “RIBN ribbon” on each of the college’s student inductees as part of the ceremony, while Academic/Career Coach Seletha Pherribo read a brief biography of each one.

With 11 out of the 18 students selected for this year’s cohort, VGCC had more inductees than the other two community colleges in the partnership, combined. In 2016, the first year of the RIBN partnership, the initial cohort consisted of three students, one from each community college.

The North Carolina Piedmont RIBN initiative is one of nine such partnerships that have been launched in North Carolina since 2008 under the direction of the Foundation for Nursing Excellence (FFNE) to increase the educational preparation of North Carolina’s nursing workforce.

VGCC Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs Dr. Levy Brown was on hand for the ceremony and made brief remarks. “Students, we are very proud of you for taking this huge step,” Brown said. He encouraged the inductees to maintain their current levels of “enthusiasm, commitment and persistence” in order to be successful.

In closing remarks, Dr. Terry Ward, director of the A&T School of Nursing, applauded the students and said she was excited by the diversity that they represent. She also recalled that she started her own education at a community college, but there was nothing like RIBN at that time to help create a straightforward pathway to completing a bachelor’s degree. “We have developed a program which will allow you to move down this path of higher education seamlessly, setting you up for the awesome success that you desire,” Ward said. Using the metaphor of tying a ribbon, she added, “Today represents you tying yourselves together with us and with your colleagues to meet the needs in our communities for nurses. You are the future of nursing.”

In addition to RIBN, VGCC has a partnership with A&T to allow graduates of its Associate Degree Nursing program to transition easily to the university’s four-year Bachelor’s program. For more information about Nursing at VGCC and bachelor’s degree options, contact academic/career coach Seletha Pherribo at (252) 738-3518 or instructor Heather Wilson at (252) 738-3393.

–VGCC–

VGCC offers Business Accelerator course for entrepreneurs

The Vance-Granville Community College Small Business Center is offering a new six-part course, “From Idea to Open: The Business Accelerator,” on Saturdays from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., starting Sept. 9, in Building 7 on the college’s Main Campus in Vance County.

The instructor for the course will be Chisa Pennix-Brown, CEO of Lady Bizness, based in Greensboro. Pennix-Brown has over 15 years of experience in business coaching, community outreach, and social media insight. She holds a master’s of business administration (MBA) degree and has served as president of the Piedmont Triad Chapter of the National Black MBA Association.

“Opening a business takes a lot of energy and planning,” Pennix-Brown said. “For those that have a great idea and want to turn it into a business to make money with immediate results, they need a program that is geared to go from ‘Idea to Open’ in a short amount of time.” Pennix-Brown said that the Business Accelerator is a specially-designed, “boot camp-style” course for serious entrepreneurs.

Upon completion of the course, attendees will receive a Business Accelerator Certification and “can expect to have a completed strategic, financial, marketing, and business plan,” she added. “This program is unique as attendees will have one-on-one access with professionals in the legal, accounting, insurance, financial, graphic design, and marketing industries to complete their business vision.”

Classes are scheduled for Sept. 9, Sept. 16, Oct. 14, Oct. 21, Nov. 4 and Nov. 18.

The cost of the course is $70.

Registration can be completed online at www.vgcc.edu/schedules/small-business-center. The deadline to register is Aug. 29.

For more information, contact Tanya Weary at [email protected] or (252) 738-3240.

–VGCC–

Water Main Break on Raleigh Road near First Street

There is a 12” water main break on Raleigh Road near First Street.  Customers along this area and streets off of Raleigh Road may experience little to no water pressure.  Crews are working to make the repair; however, until the broken water main is fully exposed there is not enough information available to determine the time frame in which the water will be turned back on.  As soon as this information is available we will update this announcement.

VGCC Practical Nursing graduates receive pins

Vance-Granville Community College honored 16 students who have completed its one-year Practical Nursing program during a pinning ceremony on Aug. 2 in the Civic Center on the college’s Main Campus. Upon receiving diplomas, graduates of the program are eligible to sit for the national exam for licensed practical nurses (NCLEX-PN).

Among the graduates recognized at the ceremony were Victoria Adesina, Christine Atieno and Kristen Clay, all of Durham; Melissa Liming of Franklinton; Christina Basnight, Frank McGhee, Jr., Antonea Nowell and Katlyn Waddell, all of Henderson; Amy Bass of Louisburg; Frances Beddingfield of Oxford; Veronicah Nyakego of Raleigh; Mariana Ascencio and James Simpson, both of Roxboro; Rashida Washington of Stem; Rachael Basham and Gabrielle Hernandez, both of Wake Forest.

In his welcoming remarks, Dr. Levy Brown, the college’s interim vice president of academic affairs, congratulated the students on completing the rigorous program, which included precepting rotations at local health-care facilities. “With their completion of the Practical Nursing program, we are excited to watch these graduates go out into the world as Vanguard nurses,” Brown said. “Having come this far, many members of this class plan to continue their education in our LPN to ADN Transition program, for licensure as an RN, and then continue for a Bachelor’s degree in Nursing. Several would like to obtain a Master’s degree in order to work as Nurse Practitioners.”

VGCC Nursing Department Chair Erica Jastrow added her congratulations to the graduates on their success. “With success comes great responsibility,” she said. “These students will have the responsibility of preparing for a challenging licensing exam, and then keeping their patients safe, caring for them as if they were their own family members, and working with their team members to create a positive work environment. I am confident that they will accept these responsibilities and will excel in them.” She thanked students for their dedication and their family members and friends for supporting the graduates.

Antonea Nowell, the class president, made remarks on behalf of her fellow students. “To our faculty, we extend a special ‘thank you’ and a debt of gratitude for helping us reach our goals to become nurses,” Nowell said. “I want to congratulate my classmates. I feel honored to have been able to grow with you. We pushed through, encouraging and inspiring one another along the way. Some of us had to work full-time jobs, raise our children and travel over an hour to class, but we overcame every obstacle to make it to this moment that marks the beginning of our future.”

Kathy Bray, a longtime VGCC clinical nursing instructor and registered nurse, served as the guest speaker. She told the graduates that the mission of the nurse has three important qualities: caring, advocacy and empathy. “Caring begins with caring for yourself,” Bray advised. “If you’re not taking care of yourself, physically, emotionally and spiritually, chances are you will not be able to give optimal care to others.… Don’t forget the little things. That’s what patients and families and remember. Always greet your patient with a smile.”

Of the second component, advocacy, Bray said: “You may be called upon to provide emotional support. Outside of their families, you may be the most trusted person in the eyes of the patient.” Finally, she said that “empathy is the ability to understand another’s experience, to communicate and confirm that understanding to the patient, and then act in a helpful manner. Empathy begins when a nurse takes his or her profession seriously. The empathetic nurse views nursing not as a job or a task, but as a service to others.”

The ceremonies concluded with the graduates receiving their distinctive pins, roses and lamps. Finally, instructor Crystal Senter led the group in reciting the “Florence Nightingale Pledge” by candlelight.

–VGCC–

 

Significant Closures Coming to I-85

RALEIGH – As work to improve I-85 accelerates, several closures and detours are coming over the next week to Vance and Warren counties.

On Tuesday Night, August 8, between 9:00 PM and 6:00 AM, Southbound I-85 will be closed north of Oine Road.  Traffic will be detoured by law enforcement to Wise Road (Exit 233), then south along U.S. 1/158 and back on to I-85.

I-85 Southbound will be closed on Wednesday August 9 near mile marker 215 from 9:00 PM to 6:00 AM.  Law enforcement will be on hand to detour motorists along Flemingtown Road and U.S. 1/158.

On Thursday, August 10, there will be a closure of I-85 Southbound near Manson Road (mile marker 233) from 9:00 PM until 6:00 AM Friday.  A detour by law enforcement will guide motorists west along Ridgeway-Drewry Road, then turning left on to Manson-Drewry Road and following that back to I-85.

From 5:30 PM Thursday, August 10 to 6:00 AM Friday, August 11, crews will install girders for the I-85 Southbound bridge at Flemingtown Road.  Flemingtown Road will be closed and a signed detour will be in place taking Northbound I-85 motorists along U.S. 1/158, Lee Avenue/Jacksontown Road, and Jackson-Royce Road to get to Flemingtown.  Those trying to get to I-85 Northbound from Flemingtown Road should follow the reverse of that route.

Finally, Starting Monday, August 14 both the on and off ramps for I-85 Southbound at Wise Road will be closed for 60 days.  Southbound I-85 motorists wishing to get to Wise Road will proceed to Ridgeway-Drewry Road (Exit 226), exit and get back on I-85 Northbound, then take Northbound off ramp at Wise Road (Exit 233).  Those wishing to get on to I-85 Southbound from Wise Road will be detoured to Rooker Dairy Road heading south to Oine Road, then to US1/158 and right onto Ridgeway-Drewry Road to get back onto I-85 southbound.  Drivers will be able to utilize the Oine Road ramps once they reopen in September.

These temporary closures are part of a five-year project to repair the deteriorating I-85 road surface, and repair and replace bridges to create safer conditions for travelers.  All closures are weather dependent and subject to change.  Motorists are still advised to use I-95, I-40, and U.S. 64 instead of I-85 when traveling between the Triangle and Richmond.  For real-time travel information, visit DriveNC.gov or follow NCDOT on Twitter.

Computer-aided design course offered at VGCC

Vance-Granville Community College has scheduled a “CAD with Solid Edge” course, to be held Monday through Thursday, Aug. 29 through Oct. 24, from 9 a.m. until noon, on the college’s Main Campus in Vance County. Grant funding from the NC TechHire program can help eligible area residents pay for this training.

Solid Edge is a Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software program, produced by Siemens PLM Software, which is used in a variety of industries, including advanced manufacturing.

This course introduces students to basic three-dimensional solid modeling and design software. Topics include basic design, creation, editing, rendering and analysis of solid models, and creation of multi-view drawings. Upon completion, students should be able to use design techniques to create, edit, render and generate a multi-view drawing.

Solid Edge is a portfolio of affordable, easy-to-use software tools that address all aspects of the product development process – 3D design, simulation, manufacturing, data management and more, thanks to a growing ecosystem of apps. Solid Edge combines the speed and simplicity of direct modeling with the flexibility and control of parametric design – made possible with synchronous technology. With Solid Edge, students can learn to create and print 2D drawings from 3D solid models and send solid models to a 3D printer.

The instructor for the course is Peter M. Robinson.

Students may become certified through Siemens upon passing the credentialing exam.

The cost of this course is $187 plus the cost of the textbook and the exam.

The course is approved for funding through the NC TechHire grant that VGCC received last year as part of a consortium of four community colleges. Area residents between the ages of 17-29 may qualify for grant funding, which can pay for registration fees, course fees, and certification fees.

Registration can be completed online at www.vgcc.edu/schedules/occupational-extension-schedule. The deadline to register is Aug. 22.

For more information, contact Sara Lloyd at 252-738-3433 or [email protected].

–VGCC–