New EMS training program to be offered at VGCC

Vance-Granville Community College will soon expand its Emergency Medical Services training options to include the internationally-recognized Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program.

Developed by the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians in cooperation with the American College of Surgeons’ Committee on Trauma, PHTLS is the leading continuing education program for prehospital emergency trauma care. The stated mission of PHTLS is “to promote excellence in trauma patient management by all providers involved in the delivery of prehospital care through global education.” The courses are intended to improve the quality of trauma care and, in turn, to save patients whose lives are in danger before they can reach the hospital. 

PHTLS promotes critical thinking as the foundation for providing quality care. It is based on the belief that, given a good foundation of knowledge and key principles, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) practitioners are capable of making reasoned decisions regarding patient care. The PHTLS course is continuously updated and revised to keep up with advances in the field.

“Adding this program will help our local responders have a better understanding of trauma and how to treat the patient,” said Stephen Barney, VGCC’s coordinator/instructor for EMS Programs. “It will bring students up to the national standard of trauma care. This will allow providers to give better care to patients.”

There are several different PHTLS courses, which, Barney said, VGCC will offer as needed, starting in the fall. The offerings include a 16-hour “Provider Course” for emergency medical responders, EMTs, Paramedics, nurses, physician assistants and physicians; an 8-hour “Refresher Course” for individuals who have successfully completed the PHTLS provider course within the past four years; a four-hour “Instructor Update,” and an 8-hour “PHTLS for First Responders” course for emergency medical responders, police officers, firefighters, rescue personnel and safety officers to prepare for rendering care to trauma patients until EMS personnel arrive. Barney said that VGCC will become one of several North Carolina community colleges offering PHTLS, while many others use the “International Trauma Life Support” training course.

VGCC offers EMS training from the basic to the Paramedic level, in addition to continuing education. For more information, call Stephen Barney at (252) 738-3273.

–VGCC–

Warren County Arts Council Accepting Subgrant Applications

by Craig Hahn

The Warren County Arts Council, in partnership with the NC Arts Council’s Grassroots Program, is accepting applications for subgrants to be awarded to local organizations for arts programs in Warren County through August 7th.

Applications are available for non-profit organizations whose purpose is to promote and develop diverse cultural arts programming in Warren County. Application forms and grant guidelines are available at http://ncarts.org/resources/local-arts-council-resources and paper copies of the applications can be picked up at the front desk of Warren County Memorial Library or at the Grant Workshop.

All NEW applicants must attend the Grassroots Arts Program Grant Workshop to assist interested applicants in preparing competitive grants on Thursday, July 27th, 5:30 p.m. at Warren County Memorial Library.

For questions or more information, please contact Warren County Arts Council at 252-213-5172 or email [email protected]

VGCC names 234 students to President’s and Dean’s Lists

Vance-Granville Community College has announced that 115 students earned President’s List and another 119 earned Dean’s List academic honors for the spring semester that ended in May.

The President’s List recognizes students who achieved a perfect 4.0 grade-point average (GPA) while carrying a “full load” (of at least 12 credit hours) in 100-level or higher curriculum courses. To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student had to earn a GPA that was at least 3.5 but less than 4.0, and have no grade lower than “B,” while carrying a “full load” of such courses.

Spring Semester President’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

 

Accounting:

Jacob H. Daniel of Oxford.

 

Associate in Arts:

Marisol Galvan Romo and Alma L. Ramirez Cortes, both of Butner;

Caitlyn A. Good of Creedmoor;

Joshua Jacobs of Durham;

Gavin C. Hardin and Destiny M. Quesenberry, both of Franklinton;

Cristin D. Abbott, Jasmine N. Allen, Kourtney J. Cockrell, Ashlyn K. Collier, Tim Jiang, Caroline M. Oakley, Brian J. Stevenson and Jakayla M. Thorpe, all of Henderson;

Allie R. Beach and Leslie A. Leake, both of Kittrell;

Loganne S. Driver and Blake A. Massengill, both of Louisburg;

Alana W. Towles, Anautica D. Wilson and Hailey T. Woodlief, all of Oxford;

Maria L. Govea of Roxboro;

Lindsay C. Henry of Youngsville.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Yuliana R. Carranza and Jolina Anne V. Chiong, both of Henderson;

Joel E. Canada of Stem.

 

Associate in Science:

Kaleb S. Williamson of Bullock;

Lindsey R. Perry of Henderson;

Kia S. Brodie and Sovanny Taylor, both of Louisburg;

Elizabeth K. Fallon of Wake Forest.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Howard W. Haley of Bullock;

Michael L. Wright of Durham;

Jeremy D. Lemay, Kenneth S. McConnell and Jacob F. Mosley, all of Henderson;

Jordan A. Alston and Hadden C. Justice, both of Louisburg;

Stephen B. Ray of Wake Forest.

 

Business Administration:

Holly A. Waddell of Henderson;

Kinequa W. Lassiter of Manson;

Jason D. Hester, Stacy T. Hicks and Latosha C. Hunt, all of Oxford;

Jason L. Thompson of Stem;

Ashley M. Kinton of Youngsville.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Tristin McClay and Christina D. Manz, both of Creedmoor;

Angelica M. Garcia-Avelar of Durham;

Zachary T. Stevenson of Oxford;

Rowan M. Morris of Warrenton.

 

Cosmetology:

Christianne Combs of Durham;

Davis B. Moore of Franklinton;

Micaela B. Crowder and Zataria M. Marrow, both of Henderson;

Alexa J. Clayton of Rougemont.

 

Criminal Justice:

Christopher L. Davis of Bullock;

Brenda G. Ellis of Durham;

Rebecka R. Paul of Henderson;

Benjamin B. Layton of Kittrell;

Leonte D. Parker of Oxford;

Martin A. Spencer of Roxboro.

 

Culinary Arts:

Taylor M. Abel of Manson;

Randy D. Bullock of Stem;

Ethel C. Fogg of Warrenton.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Makala West of Henderson.

 

Global Logistics and Distribution Management Technology:

Charles Braswell of Wilson.

 

Human Services Technology:

Fredesvinda C. Euceda-Col of Creedmoor.

 

Human Services Technology/Gerontology:

Sonya J. Barnes of Henderson;

Pamela R. Campbell of Littleton.

 

Human Services Technology/Substance Abuse:

Jawanda L. Burchette of Warrenton.

 

Information Technology:

Adam Burns and Andrew M. Watkins, both of Henderson;

Cody R. Parrott of Kittrell;

Michael A. Gokee of Louisburg.

 

Mechatronics Engineering Technology:

Charles J. Nordcliff of Creedmoor.

 

Medical Assisting:

Michelle D. Beckwith of Kittrell;

Laketa D. Bumpers of Louisburg.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Tammy Heller of Butner;

Cassidy B. Lucas and Jessica M. Noll, both of Franklinton;

Jessica C. Allgood, Tranita N. Brown, Tamara F. Glover, Cassidy J. Grissom, Raven K. Kay, Melissa O. Simmons and Timmara D. Smith, all of Henderson;

Brianna N. Lynch of Hollister;

Beverly K. Ellis of Kittrell;

Misty R. Grabowski of Louisburg;

Amanda S. Aiken of Rougemont;

Kaitlyn F. Wilson of Roxboro;

Amber S. Carey of Stem;

Rebecca T. George of Warrenton;

Thomas M. King, Jr., of Wise;

Julia A. Rhodes of Youngsville.

 

Office Administration:

Betsy M. Mason of Macon.

 

Paralegal Technology:

Celene Acuna of Henderson;

Holly H. Cashwell of Wake Forest.

 

Pharmacy Technology:

Malissa S. Chandler of Durham;

Tommy L. Hicks of Franklinton.

 

Practical Nursing:

Frank T. McGhee, Jr., of Henderson.

 

Radiography:

Katie A. Weary of Bullock;

Marco A. Carmen-Vazquez and Aaron J. McNeill, both of Oxford;

Ashley M. Rhew of Timberlake.

 

Welding Technology:

Cameron M. Brown of Creedmoor;

Joshua C. Pfohl and Cedric J. Rodebaugh, II, both of Franklinton;

Robert L. Mallory of Oxford;

Galen D. Wilds of Stem;

Quentin T. Tully of Wake Forest;

Andrew Lynam of Youngsville.

 

Spring Semester Dean’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

 

Accounting:

Wannapha N. Robinson of Louisburg;

Shiquita Evans of Townsville.

 

Associate Degree Nursing:

Valerie J. Strange of Bullock;

Kaylan C. Hoyle of Henderson;

Jeannie S. Adcock and Jodie D. Carroll, both of Oxford;

Halie C. Brooks of Raleigh.

 

Associate in Arts:

Farrah B. Foster, Samantha J. Shannon, Kaylin D. Smith and Jocelyn S. Williams, all of Creedmoor;

Karen T. Graves of Durham;

Rebekah H. Glasheen of Franklinton;

Ke’ Moni M. Champion, Chadstity V. Copeland, Lehman R. Ford, Luke M. Frazier, Alayna B. Gallagher, Brandon J. Hughes, Samuel B. Newman, Fatima A. Saleh, Bailee E. Tippett and Kianna A. Wills, all of Henderson;

Caleb R. Brauer and Matthew White, both of Norlina;

Kristy R. Ball, Erica J. Evans, Robin L. Hill  and Emely K. Ovando, all of Oxford;

Osvaldo Hernandez Martinez, Jessica M. Shelton and Caitlynn A. Taylor, all of Stem;

Seth N. Moody of Townsville;

Elizabeth N. Durand of Wake Forest;

Brian S. Restrepo of Youngsville.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Melissa B. Anderson of Butner;

Tuesday N. Mathews of Fuquay-Varina;

Brittney Hawkins and Olivia Williamson, both of Oxford;

Matthew A. Fuller of Rougemont.

 

Associate in Science:

Christopher A. Plumley of Franklinton;

Alegra A. Bass and Michael T. O’Donoghue, both of Henderson;

Jamal Algathi, Nicole F. Bowman and Zakaria I. Kassim, all of Oxford;

Lucas T. Thompson of Wake Forest.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Trey Johnson of Franklinton.

 

Business Administration:

Bobbie J. Wilkerson of Creedmoor;

Crystal R. Thomerson of Franklinton;

Tanya Fields and Amber M. Layton, both of Oxford;

Dar-Neshia S. Williams of Warrenton;

Elizabeth D. Elliott of Youngsville.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Thomas B. Grob of Bullock;

Ashley R. Healey of Raleigh.

 

Cosmetology:

Eillah Spivey of Bunn;

Cassie A. Shaffer of Butner;

Ashley M. Holden of Franklinton;

Nitianndra G. Boyd of Henderson;

Kristina M. Brantley of Louisburg;

Tonisha C. Chavis of Oxford;

Britney N. Bollinger of Wake Forest.

 

Criminal Justice:

Tyler L. Hughes of Bullock;

Adrianna M. De Nuzzia of Creedmoor;

Heather L. Taylor and Monica A. Williams, both of Franklinton;

Jose A. De Leon and Morgan T. Lawhorne, both of Henderson;

Jacob A. Quirk of Kittrell;

Charmaine A. Sutton of Louisburg;

Landon J. Hall, Daniel T. Reece and Harold T. Todd, all of Oxford;

Andrew L. Ayscue of Youngsville.

 

Culinary Arts:

Rebecca N. Groover of Franklinton;

Hayya A. Wright of Henderson;

Sara C. Cheek of Louisburg;

Dejah Davis of Stem.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Anita M. Fuller of Franklinton;

Jacquella S. Jones of Henderson;

Hayley A. Fox of Kittrell;

Brooklyn E. Mason of Louisburg;

Tomekia M. Rainey of Pinetops;

Shirolyn B. Ball of Rougemont.

 

Entrepreneurship:

Austin R. Lovegrove of Franklinton.

 

Human Services Technology/Substance Abuse:

Jennifer S. Bennett of Henderson;

Melissa A. Jackson of Oxford;

Mary A. Collins of Wendell.

 

Information Technology:

Randall S. Howard and Robert C. Hurt, both of Creedmoor;

Jerry Lizaire of Henderson;

Alisha M. Prevette of Oxford.

 

Mechatronics Engineering Technology:

Charles P. Deese of Henderson;

Jerome T. Edmonds of Oxford.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Hannah N. Scurto of Creedmoor;

Raeann Johnson and April B. Peoples, both of Henderson;

Kristie L. Brough of Oxford;

Jenese N. Caldwell of Wake Forest.

 

Paralegal Technology:

Kelly D. Persinger and Katie S. Rogers, both of Louisburg;

Jalissa M. Franklin of Sanford;

Anne D. Genest of Wake Forest.

 

Pharmacy Technology:

Tamika Everett of Creedmoor;

Kaylyn Anderson of Oxford.

 

Radiography:

Yamile A. Chavarin of Henderson;

Mark J. Meinhart of Louisburg;

Bethany Murphy of Youngsville.

 

Welding Technology:

Nicholas Keeton of Bullock;

Hernan J. Hernandez of Castalia;

Cristian J. Contreras of Creedmoor;

Donnie S. Ayscue, Andrew S. Hamrick and Eduardo Ibarra-Renteria, all of Henderson;

Ismael Trejo Labra of Norlina;

Eric L. Clayton of Oxford;

Ryan Abraham of Raleigh;

Jared Q. Siemers of Wake Forest.

 

–VGCC–

Warren County students graduate from VGCC summer transportation institute

Nineteen Warren County High School students were recently honored for graduating from the National Summer Transportation Institute (NSTI), hosted by Vance-Granville Community College’s Warren County Campus. This was the second consecutive year that the institute was offered, in addition to a similar Summer Transportation & Trades Academy held on the campus in 2015.

The three-week summer program was conducted by the college in partnership with Warren County Schools, the North Carolina Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration. The NSTI concluded on June 30, when graduation exercises were held at Warren County High School.

Graduates included WCHS students Jahmad Attucks, Timothy Batchelor, Daniel Braswell, Juan Cervantes, Timothy Edwards, Destiny Hightower, Domilig’e Hunter, Leonte Jiggetts, Dustin Jordan, Quantaya Marion, Zacchaeus Marrow, Nathan Milam, Tavis Mills, RocQuan Perry, James Robinson, Diamond Shaw, Jakayla Simes, Rhasheed Wheeler and Montellus Williams.

Three graduates were recognized with outstanding achievement awards for going “above and beyond”: Attucks, Hightower and Simes.

The ceremony, entitled “Transformation through Transportation III,” began with welcoming remarks by VGCC Warren County Campus Dean Lyndon Hall, who oversaw the NSTI grant project for the college, and Vice President of Academic Affairs Dr. Angela Ballentine. Last year, VGCC became the first community college in North Carolina to host a camp through an NSTI grant, under the leadership of recently-retired VGCC Director of Occupational Extension Jean Blaine.

The staff for the camp included coordinator Odessa Perry and assistant coordinator Leslie Dundas, both Warren County educators; and academic aide Peter Marcellas Robinson of Creedmoor, a graduate of the VGCC Electronics Engineering Technology program.

During the graduation ceremony, groups of students made presentations that summarized their experiences during the program, which focused on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) as well as “soft skills” and exploring careers in transportation by land, air and water.

The camp featured a variety of guest presenters. As they learned about workplace safety, students became certified in CPR and first aid by Stephen Barney from the VGCC Emergency Medical Services department. Among the other VGCC faculty and staff teaching sessions were Assistant Director of Financial Aid Jeremy Lambert, Librarian Jennie Davis, Academic Skills Center Coordinator Jason Snelling, College Success & Study Skills Program Head Olu Ariyo and Warren Campus Coordinator/Instructor of Basic Skills Edna Scott.

Students went on several field trips during the program, visiting the Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington, Hatteras Yacht Manufacturing, Amtrak stations in Durham and Raleigh, and the Carolina Sunrock facility in Butner.

Leigh Dennis, a Certified Equipment Manager (CEM) and manager of fleet services for Carolina Sunrock, was the guest speaker for the graduation ceremony. “What our graduates have accomplished both individually and as a team is impressive,” Dennis said. “It also has great value to them and the transportation industry.” He told the graduates, “In this program, you have met and surmounted the challenges presented to you by your instructors. You have traveled to see and experience some transportation industries at work and, in the process, been introduced to some of the vast opportunity that awaits. With the higher education programs and career paths available in the field of transportation, we are all hopeful that you will keep our industries in mind when deciding what you want to do.”

Dennis said that he had been professionally involved with the construction of transportation infrastructure (earthmoving, road-building, utilities installation and materials production) for 35 years. But even he learned something new when he visited the NSTI camp in Warrenton. “I had told some of my team where I was going that day so when I returned to work, some of them asked jokingly, ‘So, did you learn anything at school today?’ As a matter of fact, I did, I said, at which point I showed them pictures of what you were doing – learning and applying the concept of LED circuitry to arrange a circuit board to first make the lights come on and then program them to blink in succession,” he recalled.

“No one in the room was joking any more. People that have worked in the materials production and delivery part of the transportation industry for years were using words such as ‘incredible’ and ‘amazing’ to describe what they were seeing in the pictures. Activities like this prove that you have been tested in ways that help you see and apply the values of teamwork, collaboration and cooperation,” Dennis said. “When you combine that with field trips to see transportation at work in the real world, you now own what we in the business world refer to as ‘invaluable experience.’ This is a powerful term which, by the way, looks really good on college or employment applications and resumes.” He concluded by saying, “Graduates of the 2017 National Summer Transportation Institute, as a long-time member and representative of the transportation industry, I salute you and wish you well on your journeys to success.”

Also on hand to congratulate the graduates were Federal Highway Administration Civil Rights Program Manager Lynise DeVance, N.C. Department of Transportation Education Initiatives Coordinator JoAna McCoy, and VGCC Vice President of Student Services Dr. Levy Brown.

Each participant attended the camp at no cost and received a stipend based upon their attendance and active participation in camp activities.

VGCC is partnering with the DOT on a number of training initiatives, including a Heavy Equipment Operator course, which is also conducted at the Warren Campus. For more information on that program, contact Lyndon Hall at [email protected] or (252) 738-3687.

Recent VGCC grad featured in career pathways discussion for educators

Educators, local industry representatives, community leaders and a recent Vance-Granville Community College graduate shared ideas at a panel discussion organized on June 21 by the Advanced Manufacturing Skills Training Alliance (AMSTA), a partnership of VGCC, Granville County Schools, Franklin County Schools, Warren County Schools and Vance County Schools.

The event was part of “AMSTA Summer Cruisers 2017,” a multi-day program that brought teachers from the four counties together to learn more about manufacturing and the regional economy. Day three of the program was held at Franklinton High School and began with greetings from the state’s deputy superintendent of public instruction, Dr. Maria Pitre-Martin, who applauded the participants and said AMSTA is a model for the state.

Next, a discussion on “career pathways” featured panelists Ronnie Goswick, the director of business and economic development at Carolina Sunrock and a former Franklin County economic development director; Arlan Peters, manager of sustainability at Novozymes North America in Franklinton; Eric Breit, director of strategic initiatives for the Capital Area Workforce Development Board; and Thomas Boyd of Henderson, a recent VGCC Mechatronics Engineering Technology program graduate.

Barbara Boyce, representing the Triangle Regional Career Pathways Collaborative (TRCPC), served as the moderator. The collaborative consists of three workforce development boards, five community colleges (including VGCC), ten public school districts and numerous community and industry partners. The primary goal of TRCPC is to develop career pathways to align with the regional labor market and support the regional economy.

Goswick told educators that he hopes K-12 teachers will focus on so-called “soft skills,” good work habits and professionalism, which apply to any type of work. “We can train them on the job skills they will need for a particular job,” he said of new workers at his company. Similarly, Peters said that schools should produce “students who are good thinkers, who can solve a problem,” and said basic science was essential for his company. “Even in jobs that aren’t science-related, you can use your scientific training,” he noted.

Boyd was asked to talk about his pathway. He graduated from Southern Vance High School, worked for a few years, and then enrolled at VGCC, originally intending to study web design. Boyd then switched to the college’s new Mechatronics Engineering Technology degree program, primarily due to his interest in robotics. “Mechatronics is a program that combines different parts of many different fields, a little electronics engineering, mechanical engineering, a little bit of design, and overall industrial maintenance, so you’ve got a little bit of everything to get you started when you’re looking for a job,” Boyd said. “After a year in the program, I was approached about an internship opportunity for a design job at AXIS Corrugated Container, a manufacturer in Butner. I enjoyed taking the design classes, so I took the internship. After I completed the internship, they offered me a full-time job, and I’ve been working there a little over a year now.” In May, he became one of VGCC’s first three Mechatronics graduates.

Boyd said it would be beneficial for younger students to learn generally about how businesses operate, how to network and how to communicate professionally. He added that teachers should explain to students the job opportunities available for students if they earn two-year degrees, particularly in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields. “Your average high school student thinks they want to go to a four-year school and they’ll automatically get a great job right from the start, but a lot of them don’t realize that you can get a two-year degree and get a really nice-paying job,” Boyd said. “Even if they want to go to a four-year school, doing the two years at a community college first will help them out in the long run. It gives them a good start with a couple years to figure out what they really want to do, and then they can decide on furthering their education somewhere else.”

Breit, representing the workforce development field, said according to the latest research, “the quality of the current and future workforce is now the single most important factor for industry recruitment and retention, so employers want to know about not only current workers but also about the local schools.” He added that the nine Triangle-area counties, including both urban and rural areas, are considered a single labor market, “so it makes sense for workforce development boards, community colleges and public schools throughout the region to put our heads together to see how we can better collectively serve the region, our employers and our students.” Breit said that TRCPC is focused on jobs that are in demand, in the sectors of advanced manufacturing, information technology, life sciences and health care.

After the discussion, a second panel was held to discuss school choice and its impact on the public school systems. Speakers included Dave Machado, director of the Office of Charter Schools at the N.C. Department of Public Instruction, and Dr. Deanna Townsend-Smith, assistant director of that office.

Finally, attendees received updates from several guests. Jo Anne Honeycutt, director of Career & Technical Education (CTE) for the N.C. Department of Public Instruction, said that her department is emphasizing Work-Based Learning (WBL) opportunities and is working on a new high-school-to-college articulation agreement that will help students transfer their high school course credits to colleges. LaTanya Patillio, a former CTE teacher and the new teacher advisor to Gov. Roy Cooper, addressed educators and said that “AMSTA is an example of what public schools are doing right.”

Tresha Layne from the Southern Regional Education Board said that she is working with AMSTA on professional development tied to project-based learning, and praised the partnership for helping the K-12 schools collaborate with VGCC and employers to develop a skilled talent “pipeline.” Sara Lloyd, VGCC’s director of customized training, added that she fields calls from industries about their workforce development needs and helps to connect them to K-12 schools and the college concerning internship opportunities.

Attendees concluded the event by touring Franklinton High School’s Career & Technical Education wing.

For more information on AMSTA, contact Stephanie Ayers at [email protected] or (919) 316-0026.

–VGCC–

Thirty Seven Domestic Violence Related Homicides Reported in NC in 2017

From January 1 to July 2, 2017, there have been 37 Homicides as a direct result of Domestic Violence in North Carolina, according to the North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

THIS HAS TO STOP!

If you or someone you know is a victim of Domestic Violence, please call FAMILIES LIVING VIOLENCE FREE.

919-693-5700 or Hispanic line 919-690-0888 anytime day or night, 7 days a week.

You could be saving a life…may be your own.

 

Peggy Roark

Adult & Empowerment Services

Families Living Violence Free

125 Oxford Outer Loop Road

PO Box 1632

Oxford, NC 27565

Office: 919-693-3579

Crisis: 919-693-5700

Website: www.flvf.org

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Warren Family Institute Back To School Supply Drive Thru July 31st

by Craig Hahn

The Warren Family Institute is currently conducting a Back-ToSchool Supply Drive. You can help them by donating school supplies for the Children of Warren County. Any size donation will be greatly appreciated.

The Supply Drive goes on now thru 31 July. Items may be dropped off at the following location: 427 West Franklin Street, Warrenton (on the campus of Hawkins Ed. Ctr. Bldg. 6). Or you can call for pick-up at 252-257-1134. If you would rather donate money to buy school supplies, please mail your check to:

Warren Family Institute PO Box 150 Warrenton, NC 27589

All school supplies will be given away at various Warren County Community Events.

Thank you!

VGCC connects students and new graduates to employers

As the end of the spring semester approached, the staff of the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program at Vance-Granville Community College held their first-ever “College-to-Career Mixer” for students to meet with potential employers. Not only were 15 new graduates of the Welding Technology and Mechatronics Engineering Technology programs in attendance, but also five students who were not yet ready to graduate but were looking for potential Work-Based Learning (WBL) opportunities.

Prior to the event, college staff members drilled the students on job interview techniques, and some students participated in mock interviews. All received resume preparation assistance and detailed information about the employers who would be in attendance at the mixer. Participating employers included BFS Industries, LLC, of Butner; Bridgestone/Bandag of Oxford; Novozymes North America of Franklinton; Carolina Sunrock of Kittrell and Butner; Trulite Glass & Aluminum Solutions of Youngsville; Glen Raven of Norlina; Delhaize America of Butner; J.P. Taylor/Universal Leaf of Oxford; and Altec of Creedmoor. 

“As we move forward, VGCC will be looking for ways to increase our synergy with our employer partners while providing a robust pipeline for qualified future employees,” said Zane Styers, who manages the TAACCCT grant. “Industry tours, Work-Based Learning, internships and apprenticeships are options that form the framework for our College-to-Career pipeline.”

The $1.75 million TAACCCT grant, the largest single competitive grant in VGCC history, has helped the college develop and enhance innovative training programs for advanced manufacturing careers. The TAACCCT grants are part of a nearly $2 billion initiative of the U.S. Department of Labor to expand targeted training programs for unemployed workers, especially those impacted by foreign trade. For more information on TAACCCT, contact Zane Styers at [email protected] or (252) 738-3342.

–VGCC–

Keep Independence Day celebrations safe with these fire-safety tips

RALEIGH – Officials with the N.C. Forest Service encourage people to celebrate Independence Day by viewing public fireworks displays rather than risk starting fires with their own fireworks.

“The careless use of sparklers, fountains, glow worms, smoke devices, trick noisemakers and other Class C fireworks can cause wildfires,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “Each year, wildfires in North Carolina endanger people, destroy millions of dollars’ worth of timber and property, and damage the environment.”

If people use their own fireworks, here are some safety tips:

  • Don’t use fireworks such as ground spinners, firecrackers, round spinners, Roman candles, bottle rockets and mortars, which are illegal in North Carolina.
  • Do not use fireworks near woods or any combustible material.
  • Make sure fireworks are always used with adult supervision.
  • Follow the instructions provided with the fireworks.
  • Do not use fireworks while under the influence of alcohol.
  • Always use in a large, open and, preferably, paved area or near a body of water.
  • Have a rake or shovel and a bucket or two of water on hand.
  • Monitor the area for several hours after use.

With more homes being built in wooded areas, it’s important to take extra precautions to prevent wildfires in residential areas, said State Forester David Lane. “In addition to taking measures to use fireworks safely, campfires or grills should never be left unattended and should never be started with gasoline,” Lane said.

Ashes should be doused in water and stirred. Repeat this process to ensure the ashes are cold. Never put ashes in a paper bag or other flammable container, but instead place them in an outside metal container or bury them in mineral soil in a garden. Never store ashes in a garage, on a deck or in a wooded area. Double-check ashes and coals before throwing them away to make sure they won’t start a fire.

The Crossing at Lake Gaston Coming August 12th

by Craig Hahn

The Eaton Ferry Bridge is the place to be for a morning of fun for the entire family. The Crossing begins promptly at 9 am. Registration begins at 8:00 am.

THE CROSSING is an annual event for the Lake Gaston Community and is sponsored by O’SAIL. The goal is to encourage the Lake Gaston population to annually get in the water and join others in a non-motorized crossing of the lake in mass. THE CROSSING will occur in a protected area adjacent to the Eaton Ferry Bridge secured by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary.

THE CROSSING requires registration of all participants. There is a preregistration fee of $25.00 or $30.00 the day of the event. Upon completion of the event, participants will receive complimentary fruit and water at the finish and a limited edition t-shirt. (Note: Preferred T-Shirt size cannot be guaranteed for those who register the day of the event)

The two classes of participants are:
 SWIMMERS o Under 13 years of age must have signed life guard statement that they have a proven ability to swim the distance or be accompanied by an adult throughout the swim. o Must wear swim cap for visibility, swim caps will be provided at registration check-in.  NON-MOTORIZED VESSELS o All riders must wear PFD. o Can be individual or team entry
o Can use commercial or self-made vessel. All vessels must be water sound and may be disqualified by officials at the entrance area if they are deemed to be unsafe or not able to make the distance.  THE WAVERS o Beyond the usual non-motorized water vessels, we’re encouraging you to use your imagination. The WAVER category was created to encourage small or large groups to cross together in the most creative ways possible. Some examples might be connected by noodles or even floating atop their own creation of a boat, barge, raft, etc.

How can you join the fun? Register below and show up the day of the event ready to have fun with your team and your creation. *NOTE: Registration may be completed online through 5PM, Friday 8/11. Registration the day of the event is $30.