VGCC names 234 students to President’s and Dean’s Lists

Vance-Granville Community College has announced that 115 students earned President’s List and another 119 earned Dean’s List academic honors for the spring semester that ended in May.

The President’s List recognizes students who achieved a perfect 4.0 grade-point average (GPA) while carrying a “full load” (of at least 12 credit hours) in 100-level or higher curriculum courses. To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student had to earn a GPA that was at least 3.5 but less than 4.0, and have no grade lower than “B,” while carrying a “full load” of such courses.

Spring Semester President’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

 

Accounting:

Jacob H. Daniel of Oxford.

 

Associate in Arts:

Marisol Galvan Romo and Alma L. Ramirez Cortes, both of Butner;

Caitlyn A. Good of Creedmoor;

Joshua Jacobs of Durham;

Gavin C. Hardin and Destiny M. Quesenberry, both of Franklinton;

Cristin D. Abbott, Jasmine N. Allen, Kourtney J. Cockrell, Ashlyn K. Collier, Tim Jiang, Caroline M. Oakley, Brian J. Stevenson and Jakayla M. Thorpe, all of Henderson;

Allie R. Beach and Leslie A. Leake, both of Kittrell;

Loganne S. Driver and Blake A. Massengill, both of Louisburg;

Alana W. Towles, Anautica D. Wilson and Hailey T. Woodlief, all of Oxford;

Maria L. Govea of Roxboro;

Lindsay C. Henry of Youngsville.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Yuliana R. Carranza and Jolina Anne V. Chiong, both of Henderson;

Joel E. Canada of Stem.

 

Associate in Science:

Kaleb S. Williamson of Bullock;

Lindsey R. Perry of Henderson;

Kia S. Brodie and Sovanny Taylor, both of Louisburg;

Elizabeth K. Fallon of Wake Forest.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Howard W. Haley of Bullock;

Michael L. Wright of Durham;

Jeremy D. Lemay, Kenneth S. McConnell and Jacob F. Mosley, all of Henderson;

Jordan A. Alston and Hadden C. Justice, both of Louisburg;

Stephen B. Ray of Wake Forest.

 

Business Administration:

Holly A. Waddell of Henderson;

Kinequa W. Lassiter of Manson;

Jason D. Hester, Stacy T. Hicks and Latosha C. Hunt, all of Oxford;

Jason L. Thompson of Stem;

Ashley M. Kinton of Youngsville.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Tristin McClay and Christina D. Manz, both of Creedmoor;

Angelica M. Garcia-Avelar of Durham;

Zachary T. Stevenson of Oxford;

Rowan M. Morris of Warrenton.

 

Cosmetology:

Christianne Combs of Durham;

Davis B. Moore of Franklinton;

Micaela B. Crowder and Zataria M. Marrow, both of Henderson;

Alexa J. Clayton of Rougemont.

 

Criminal Justice:

Christopher L. Davis of Bullock;

Brenda G. Ellis of Durham;

Rebecka R. Paul of Henderson;

Benjamin B. Layton of Kittrell;

Leonte D. Parker of Oxford;

Martin A. Spencer of Roxboro.

 

Culinary Arts:

Taylor M. Abel of Manson;

Randy D. Bullock of Stem;

Ethel C. Fogg of Warrenton.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Makala West of Henderson.

 

Global Logistics and Distribution Management Technology:

Charles Braswell of Wilson.

 

Human Services Technology:

Fredesvinda C. Euceda-Col of Creedmoor.

 

Human Services Technology/Gerontology:

Sonya J. Barnes of Henderson;

Pamela R. Campbell of Littleton.

 

Human Services Technology/Substance Abuse:

Jawanda L. Burchette of Warrenton.

 

Information Technology:

Adam Burns and Andrew M. Watkins, both of Henderson;

Cody R. Parrott of Kittrell;

Michael A. Gokee of Louisburg.

 

Mechatronics Engineering Technology:

Charles J. Nordcliff of Creedmoor.

 

Medical Assisting:

Michelle D. Beckwith of Kittrell;

Laketa D. Bumpers of Louisburg.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Tammy Heller of Butner;

Cassidy B. Lucas and Jessica M. Noll, both of Franklinton;

Jessica C. Allgood, Tranita N. Brown, Tamara F. Glover, Cassidy J. Grissom, Raven K. Kay, Melissa O. Simmons and Timmara D. Smith, all of Henderson;

Brianna N. Lynch of Hollister;

Beverly K. Ellis of Kittrell;

Misty R. Grabowski of Louisburg;

Amanda S. Aiken of Rougemont;

Kaitlyn F. Wilson of Roxboro;

Amber S. Carey of Stem;

Rebecca T. George of Warrenton;

Thomas M. King, Jr., of Wise;

Julia A. Rhodes of Youngsville.

 

Office Administration:

Betsy M. Mason of Macon.

 

Paralegal Technology:

Celene Acuna of Henderson;

Holly H. Cashwell of Wake Forest.

 

Pharmacy Technology:

Malissa S. Chandler of Durham;

Tommy L. Hicks of Franklinton.

 

Practical Nursing:

Frank T. McGhee, Jr., of Henderson.

 

Radiography:

Katie A. Weary of Bullock;

Marco A. Carmen-Vazquez and Aaron J. McNeill, both of Oxford;

Ashley M. Rhew of Timberlake.

 

Welding Technology:

Cameron M. Brown of Creedmoor;

Joshua C. Pfohl and Cedric J. Rodebaugh, II, both of Franklinton;

Robert L. Mallory of Oxford;

Galen D. Wilds of Stem;

Quentin T. Tully of Wake Forest;

Andrew Lynam of Youngsville.

 

Spring Semester Dean’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

 

Accounting:

Wannapha N. Robinson of Louisburg;

Shiquita Evans of Townsville.

 

Associate Degree Nursing:

Valerie J. Strange of Bullock;

Kaylan C. Hoyle of Henderson;

Jeannie S. Adcock and Jodie D. Carroll, both of Oxford;

Halie C. Brooks of Raleigh.

 

Associate in Arts:

Farrah B. Foster, Samantha J. Shannon, Kaylin D. Smith and Jocelyn S. Williams, all of Creedmoor;

Karen T. Graves of Durham;

Rebekah H. Glasheen of Franklinton;

Ke’ Moni M. Champion, Chadstity V. Copeland, Lehman R. Ford, Luke M. Frazier, Alayna B. Gallagher, Brandon J. Hughes, Samuel B. Newman, Fatima A. Saleh, Bailee E. Tippett and Kianna A. Wills, all of Henderson;

Caleb R. Brauer and Matthew White, both of Norlina;

Kristy R. Ball, Erica J. Evans, Robin L. Hill  and Emely K. Ovando, all of Oxford;

Osvaldo Hernandez Martinez, Jessica M. Shelton and Caitlynn A. Taylor, all of Stem;

Seth N. Moody of Townsville;

Elizabeth N. Durand of Wake Forest;

Brian S. Restrepo of Youngsville.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Melissa B. Anderson of Butner;

Tuesday N. Mathews of Fuquay-Varina;

Brittney Hawkins and Olivia Williamson, both of Oxford;

Matthew A. Fuller of Rougemont.

 

Associate in Science:

Christopher A. Plumley of Franklinton;

Alegra A. Bass and Michael T. O’Donoghue, both of Henderson;

Jamal Algathi, Nicole F. Bowman and Zakaria I. Kassim, all of Oxford;

Lucas T. Thompson of Wake Forest.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Trey Johnson of Franklinton.

 

Business Administration:

Bobbie J. Wilkerson of Creedmoor;

Crystal R. Thomerson of Franklinton;

Tanya Fields and Amber M. Layton, both of Oxford;

Dar-Neshia S. Williams of Warrenton;

Elizabeth D. Elliott of Youngsville.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Thomas B. Grob of Bullock;

Ashley R. Healey of Raleigh.

 

Cosmetology:

Eillah Spivey of Bunn;

Cassie A. Shaffer of Butner;

Ashley M. Holden of Franklinton;

Nitianndra G. Boyd of Henderson;

Kristina M. Brantley of Louisburg;

Tonisha C. Chavis of Oxford;

Britney N. Bollinger of Wake Forest.

 

Criminal Justice:

Tyler L. Hughes of Bullock;

Adrianna M. De Nuzzia of Creedmoor;

Heather L. Taylor and Monica A. Williams, both of Franklinton;

Jose A. De Leon and Morgan T. Lawhorne, both of Henderson;

Jacob A. Quirk of Kittrell;

Charmaine A. Sutton of Louisburg;

Landon J. Hall, Daniel T. Reece and Harold T. Todd, all of Oxford;

Andrew L. Ayscue of Youngsville.

 

Culinary Arts:

Rebecca N. Groover of Franklinton;

Hayya A. Wright of Henderson;

Sara C. Cheek of Louisburg;

Dejah Davis of Stem.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Anita M. Fuller of Franklinton;

Jacquella S. Jones of Henderson;

Hayley A. Fox of Kittrell;

Brooklyn E. Mason of Louisburg;

Tomekia M. Rainey of Pinetops;

Shirolyn B. Ball of Rougemont.

 

Entrepreneurship:

Austin R. Lovegrove of Franklinton.

 

Human Services Technology/Substance Abuse:

Jennifer S. Bennett of Henderson;

Melissa A. Jackson of Oxford;

Mary A. Collins of Wendell.

 

Information Technology:

Randall S. Howard and Robert C. Hurt, both of Creedmoor;

Jerry Lizaire of Henderson;

Alisha M. Prevette of Oxford.

 

Mechatronics Engineering Technology:

Charles P. Deese of Henderson;

Jerome T. Edmonds of Oxford.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Hannah N. Scurto of Creedmoor;

Raeann Johnson and April B. Peoples, both of Henderson;

Kristie L. Brough of Oxford;

Jenese N. Caldwell of Wake Forest.

 

Paralegal Technology:

Kelly D. Persinger and Katie S. Rogers, both of Louisburg;

Jalissa M. Franklin of Sanford;

Anne D. Genest of Wake Forest.

 

Pharmacy Technology:

Tamika Everett of Creedmoor;

Kaylyn Anderson of Oxford.

 

Radiography:

Yamile A. Chavarin of Henderson;

Mark J. Meinhart of Louisburg;

Bethany Murphy of Youngsville.

 

Welding Technology:

Nicholas Keeton of Bullock;

Hernan J. Hernandez of Castalia;

Cristian J. Contreras of Creedmoor;

Donnie S. Ayscue, Andrew S. Hamrick and Eduardo Ibarra-Renteria, all of Henderson;

Ismael Trejo Labra of Norlina;

Eric L. Clayton of Oxford;

Ryan Abraham of Raleigh;

Jared Q. Siemers of Wake Forest.

 

–VGCC–

Granville County Commissioners to kick-off new Law Enforcement Center

PUBLIC NOTICE

A quorum of the Granville County Board of Commissioners may be present on Thursday, July 13, 2017 for an official kick-off of the Law Enforcement Center Project. The kick-off will be held at 1:45 p.m. at the Granville County Senior Center located at 107 Lanier Street, Oxford, NC, in the large conference room. For more information, please contact the County Manager’s Office at 919-693-5240.

Debra A. Weary

Clerk to the Board

 

Debra A. Weary

Clerk to the Board

Assistant to the County Manager

P.O. Box 906

141 Williamsboro Street

Oxford, NC  27565

Recent VGCC grad featured in career pathways discussion for educators

Educators, local industry representatives, community leaders and a recent Vance-Granville Community College graduate shared ideas at a panel discussion organized on June 21 by the Advanced Manufacturing Skills Training Alliance (AMSTA), a partnership of VGCC, Granville County Schools, Franklin County Schools, Warren County Schools and Vance County Schools.

The event was part of “AMSTA Summer Cruisers 2017,” a multi-day program that brought teachers from the four counties together to learn more about manufacturing and the regional economy. Day three of the program was held at Franklinton High School and began with greetings from the state’s deputy superintendent of public instruction, Dr. Maria Pitre-Martin, who applauded the participants and said AMSTA is a model for the state.

Next, a discussion on “career pathways” featured panelists Ronnie Goswick, the director of business and economic development at Carolina Sunrock and a former Franklin County economic development director; Arlan Peters, manager of sustainability at Novozymes North America in Franklinton; Eric Breit, director of strategic initiatives for the Capital Area Workforce Development Board; and Thomas Boyd of Henderson, a recent VGCC Mechatronics Engineering Technology program graduate.

Barbara Boyce, representing the Triangle Regional Career Pathways Collaborative (TRCPC), served as the moderator. The collaborative consists of three workforce development boards, five community colleges (including VGCC), ten public school districts and numerous community and industry partners. The primary goal of TRCPC is to develop career pathways to align with the regional labor market and support the regional economy.

Goswick told educators that he hopes K-12 teachers will focus on so-called “soft skills,” good work habits and professionalism, which apply to any type of work. “We can train them on the job skills they will need for a particular job,” he said of new workers at his company. Similarly, Peters said that schools should produce “students who are good thinkers, who can solve a problem,” and said basic science was essential for his company. “Even in jobs that aren’t science-related, you can use your scientific training,” he noted.

Boyd was asked to talk about his pathway. He graduated from Southern Vance High School, worked for a few years, and then enrolled at VGCC, originally intending to study web design. Boyd then switched to the college’s new Mechatronics Engineering Technology degree program, primarily due to his interest in robotics. “Mechatronics is a program that combines different parts of many different fields, a little electronics engineering, mechanical engineering, a little bit of design, and overall industrial maintenance, so you’ve got a little bit of everything to get you started when you’re looking for a job,” Boyd said. “After a year in the program, I was approached about an internship opportunity for a design job at AXIS Corrugated Container, a manufacturer in Butner. I enjoyed taking the design classes, so I took the internship. After I completed the internship, they offered me a full-time job, and I’ve been working there a little over a year now.” In May, he became one of VGCC’s first three Mechatronics graduates.

Boyd said it would be beneficial for younger students to learn generally about how businesses operate, how to network and how to communicate professionally. He added that teachers should explain to students the job opportunities available for students if they earn two-year degrees, particularly in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields. “Your average high school student thinks they want to go to a four-year school and they’ll automatically get a great job right from the start, but a lot of them don’t realize that you can get a two-year degree and get a really nice-paying job,” Boyd said. “Even if they want to go to a four-year school, doing the two years at a community college first will help them out in the long run. It gives them a good start with a couple years to figure out what they really want to do, and then they can decide on furthering their education somewhere else.”

Breit, representing the workforce development field, said according to the latest research, “the quality of the current and future workforce is now the single most important factor for industry recruitment and retention, so employers want to know about not only current workers but also about the local schools.” He added that the nine Triangle-area counties, including both urban and rural areas, are considered a single labor market, “so it makes sense for workforce development boards, community colleges and public schools throughout the region to put our heads together to see how we can better collectively serve the region, our employers and our students.” Breit said that TRCPC is focused on jobs that are in demand, in the sectors of advanced manufacturing, information technology, life sciences and health care.

After the discussion, a second panel was held to discuss school choice and its impact on the public school systems. Speakers included Dave Machado, director of the Office of Charter Schools at the N.C. Department of Public Instruction, and Dr. Deanna Townsend-Smith, assistant director of that office.

Finally, attendees received updates from several guests. Jo Anne Honeycutt, director of Career & Technical Education (CTE) for the N.C. Department of Public Instruction, said that her department is emphasizing Work-Based Learning (WBL) opportunities and is working on a new high-school-to-college articulation agreement that will help students transfer their high school course credits to colleges. LaTanya Patillio, a former CTE teacher and the new teacher advisor to Gov. Roy Cooper, addressed educators and said that “AMSTA is an example of what public schools are doing right.”

Tresha Layne from the Southern Regional Education Board said that she is working with AMSTA on professional development tied to project-based learning, and praised the partnership for helping the K-12 schools collaborate with VGCC and employers to develop a skilled talent “pipeline.” Sara Lloyd, VGCC’s director of customized training, added that she fields calls from industries about their workforce development needs and helps to connect them to K-12 schools and the college concerning internship opportunities.

Attendees concluded the event by touring Franklinton High School’s Career & Technical Education wing.

For more information on AMSTA, contact Stephanie Ayers at [email protected] or (919) 316-0026.

–VGCC–

Granville County Board of Education Names New Superintendent

The Granville County Board of Education is pleased to announce the selection and appointment of Dr. Alisa McLean as the next superintendent of the Granville County Public Schools (GCPS). Dr. McLean will take office on July 19.

During the search process, the board carefully reviewed applications from a diverse field of 46 excellent candidates. Although many qualified candidates applied, the board felt that Dr. McLean’s leadership, experience, and dedication to students would best serve GCPS students, staff, and the community for years to come. The board is confident that Dr. McLean will lead the school system to even higher achievement. 

Dr. McLean has enjoyed a successful career in public education spanning over 20 years in North Carolina. Since 2016, she has served as the assistant superintendent for teaching, learning, and leadership for the Durham Public Schools. Prior to her current position, Dr. McLean served as an area superintendent for the Durham Public Schools (2014-2016). Dr. McLean also previously served as a school transformation coach with the N.C. Department of Public Instruction (2011-2014) and as an assistant superintendent in the Alamance-Burlington School System (2009-2011). She began her career in public education as an assistant principal and principal in Roxboro and Hillsborough, North Carolina.

Dr. McLean has an impressive academic background as well, including a bachelor’s degree in English education from Elizabeth City State University. She went on to obtain a master’s degree in educational administration and supervision from East Carolina University and a doctorate in educational leadership from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She also participated in and later served as a consultant and assistant director for the Principals’ Executive Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dr. McLean looks forward to the opportunity to lead the Granville County Public Schools and becoming an active member of the community. Dr. McLean  is the daughter of Dr. & Mrs. AC Robinson, Jr. of Elizabeth City, NC.  She and her husband, Attorney Frankie McLean are the proud parents of their daughter Imari, who is an ACC scholar track and field athlete and rising Senior at NC State University. Dr. McLean has issued the following statement about the position:

“I am both, excited and honored to join the Granville County Public Schools family and community.  Together, I know we will accomplish great things and surpass expectations for all of our students.  I truly believe the best is yet to come!”

Please join the board in welcoming Dr. Alisa McLean as the new superintendent of the Granville County Public Schools.

Thirty Seven Domestic Violence Related Homicides Reported in NC in 2017

From January 1 to July 2, 2017, there have been 37 Homicides as a direct result of Domestic Violence in North Carolina, according to the North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

THIS HAS TO STOP!

If you or someone you know is a victim of Domestic Violence, please call FAMILIES LIVING VIOLENCE FREE.

919-693-5700 or Hispanic line 919-690-0888 anytime day or night, 7 days a week.

You could be saving a life…may be your own.

 

Peggy Roark

Adult & Empowerment Services

Families Living Violence Free

125 Oxford Outer Loop Road

PO Box 1632

Oxford, NC 27565

Office: 919-693-3579

Crisis: 919-693-5700

Website: www.flvf.org

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VGCC connects students and new graduates to employers

As the end of the spring semester approached, the staff of the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program at Vance-Granville Community College held their first-ever “College-to-Career Mixer” for students to meet with potential employers. Not only were 15 new graduates of the Welding Technology and Mechatronics Engineering Technology programs in attendance, but also five students who were not yet ready to graduate but were looking for potential Work-Based Learning (WBL) opportunities.

Prior to the event, college staff members drilled the students on job interview techniques, and some students participated in mock interviews. All received resume preparation assistance and detailed information about the employers who would be in attendance at the mixer. Participating employers included BFS Industries, LLC, of Butner; Bridgestone/Bandag of Oxford; Novozymes North America of Franklinton; Carolina Sunrock of Kittrell and Butner; Trulite Glass & Aluminum Solutions of Youngsville; Glen Raven of Norlina; Delhaize America of Butner; J.P. Taylor/Universal Leaf of Oxford; and Altec of Creedmoor. 

“As we move forward, VGCC will be looking for ways to increase our synergy with our employer partners while providing a robust pipeline for qualified future employees,” said Zane Styers, who manages the TAACCCT grant. “Industry tours, Work-Based Learning, internships and apprenticeships are options that form the framework for our College-to-Career pipeline.”

The $1.75 million TAACCCT grant, the largest single competitive grant in VGCC history, has helped the college develop and enhance innovative training programs for advanced manufacturing careers. The TAACCCT grants are part of a nearly $2 billion initiative of the U.S. Department of Labor to expand targeted training programs for unemployed workers, especially those impacted by foreign trade. For more information on TAACCCT, contact Zane Styers at [email protected] or (252) 738-3342.

–VGCC–

Keep Independence Day celebrations safe with these fire-safety tips

RALEIGH – Officials with the N.C. Forest Service encourage people to celebrate Independence Day by viewing public fireworks displays rather than risk starting fires with their own fireworks.

“The careless use of sparklers, fountains, glow worms, smoke devices, trick noisemakers and other Class C fireworks can cause wildfires,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “Each year, wildfires in North Carolina endanger people, destroy millions of dollars’ worth of timber and property, and damage the environment.”

If people use their own fireworks, here are some safety tips:

  • Don’t use fireworks such as ground spinners, firecrackers, round spinners, Roman candles, bottle rockets and mortars, which are illegal in North Carolina.
  • Do not use fireworks near woods or any combustible material.
  • Make sure fireworks are always used with adult supervision.
  • Follow the instructions provided with the fireworks.
  • Do not use fireworks while under the influence of alcohol.
  • Always use in a large, open and, preferably, paved area or near a body of water.
  • Have a rake or shovel and a bucket or two of water on hand.
  • Monitor the area for several hours after use.

With more homes being built in wooded areas, it’s important to take extra precautions to prevent wildfires in residential areas, said State Forester David Lane. “In addition to taking measures to use fireworks safely, campfires or grills should never be left unattended and should never be started with gasoline,” Lane said.

Ashes should be doused in water and stirred. Repeat this process to ensure the ashes are cold. Never put ashes in a paper bag or other flammable container, but instead place them in an outside metal container or bury them in mineral soil in a garden. Never store ashes in a garage, on a deck or in a wooded area. Double-check ashes and coals before throwing them away to make sure they won’t start a fire.

Granville County Board of Education Appoints Acting Superintendent

On Thursday, June 29, the Granville County Board of Education announced several important updates regarding key leadership positions at the district level.

 

Following the retirement of Dr. Dorwin L. Howard Sr. as Superintendent effective June 30, the Board appointed Dr. Michael A. Myrick, to serve as Acting Superintendent until the new Superintendent search process is finalized. Dr. Myrick serves as the Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction and Student Services.

 

During this interim role, Dr. Myrick will assume the responsibilities as Superintendent and also take on the added duties associated with Maintenance & Facilities, Transportation and Safety.

 

Ms. Beth Day, Assistant Superintendent for Finance, will take on the added duties of Child Nutrition, and Custodial, Recycling/Energy Education and Warehouse Services.

 

Both Dr. Myrick and Ms.. Beth Day are contractually employed through June 30, 2018.

 

Ms. Betty Hicks was named Executive Assistant to the Superintendent and Clerk to the Board of Education effective July 1. Ms. Hicks has more than 17 years experience working with Granville County Public Schools, having served in school-based support roles, and most recently as the Executive Assistant to the Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources and Operations.

 

Board Chairman Thomas Houlihan offered his comments on the changes, “The Board has been working very hard over the past several months to find the best possible candidate to lead our schools as Superintendent. These adjustments in personnel will help ensure continuity of services for our students and the community. Once the new Superintendent is announced, we can continue the progress toward transforming our schools to be the best in the state, and even the nation. Our students deserve nothing less.”

 

The Granville County Board of Education has scheduled a special called meeting on Thursday, July 6 at 6:00 pm for the purposes of personnel.  The meeting will take place at 101 Delacroix St. Oxford, N.C.

Granville County provides new option for proper disposal of worn U.S. flags

Oxford, June 29, 2017- In partnership with the National Association of Counties, the National Flag Foundation and the National Sheriffs Association, Granville County has installed a flag retirement box, at no cost to the county, at the Granville County Administration Building at 141 Williamsboro Street, Oxford. Flags should be folded respectfully before being placed in the box.

The United States Flag Code prescribes flag etiquette — everything from flying it near other flags to instructions on how to raise and lower it. “The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem of display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning,” says the code. 

Members of Boy Scouts will be responsible for the proper disposal of the worn flags. Flag disposal boxes are provided free of charge to NACo member counties thanks to generous national sponsorship from Nationwide Insurance & Lamar Advertising.

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About Granville County Government:

Granville County Government enhances the quality of life for the citizens of the County by providing an array of services through a responsive, effective, and efficient local government. Learn more at www.granvillecounty.org. Follow Granville County Government on Facebook @GranvilleCountyGov.

About National Association of Counties:

The National Association of Counties (NACo) unites America’s 3,069 county governments.  Founded in 1935, NACo brings county officials together to advocate with a collective voice on national policy, exchange ideas and build new leadership skills, pursue transformational county solutions, enrich the public’s understanding of county government and exercise exemplary leadership in public service.  More information at: www.naco.org.

Granville Board to Meet July 10, 2017

Debra Weary, clerk to the Granville County Board of Commissioners, has announced to the media a change of the July meeting date.

In an email she wrote, “The Granville County Board of Commissioners will meet on Monday, July 10, 2017 instead of Monday, July 3, 2017 as previously advertised due to the July 4th holiday. Meetings are held at 7:00 p.m. at the Granville Expo & Convention Center located at 4185 Highway 15 South, Oxford.”

Visit Granville County online at www.granvillecounty.org.