Thousands answer the call, but Red Cross blood shortage continues

In appreciation, $5 Target eGiftCard™ available for all those who come out to give

DURHAM, N.C. (July 25, 2017) — Thousands of people have responded to the emergency call for blood and platelet donations issued by the American Red Cross in early July, but there continues to be a critical summer blood shortage. Eligible donors of all types are urgently needed.

After issuing the emergency call, the Red Cross has experienced a 30 percent increase in blood donation appointments through mid-July. About half of the appointments were scheduled by donors using the free Blood Donor App or at redcrossblood.org. Despite this improvement, blood products are still being distributed to hospitals as fast as donations are coming in, so more donations are needed to meet patient needs and replenish the blood supply.

“The blood supply is like a cell phone battery, it constantly needs recharging,” said Maya Franklin of the Carolinas Blood Services Region. “We sincerely appreciate those who have responded to the call to help save lives and encourage those who haven’t to consider rolling up a sleeve and give the gift of life. It only takes about an hour but can mean a lifetime for patients.”

Nearly 61,000 fewer blood donations than needed were given through the Red Cross in May and June, prompting the emergency call for donations in early July. The shortfall was the equivalent of the Red Cross not receiving any blood donations for more than four days.

How to help

To schedule an appointment to donate, use the Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Donation appointments and completion of a RapidPass online health history questionnaire are encouraged to help reduce the time it takes to donate.

As a special thank you, those who come out to give blood or platelets with the Red Cross July 26 through Aug. 31 will be emailed a $5 Target eGiftCard™.*

Who blood and platelet donations help

Blood shortages could lead to delays in patient care, something Arthur Bourget learned firsthand after being diagnosed with leukemia in July 2007. When he arrived for his second blood transfusion, he was told the blood he needed was not available. He waited eight hours for blood to arrive and to receive the transfusion he needed that day.

“One thing that I committed to my wife was that I was going to beat leukemia, no matter what, and I was going to do that,” said Bourget. “But what I wasn’t going to be able to do was survive without the blood that I needed.”

Bourget went into remission following a successful treatment plan, which included 28 blood and 34 platelet transfusions. He has been a faithful advocate for blood donations ever since.

“If it wasn’t for the generosity of volunteer blood donors, I would not be here today,” he said. “My daughter would not have a father, and my wife would not have a husband. Thank you and please give blood. You may never know the life you have saved, but I guarantee they will never forget you.”

Upcoming blood donation opportunities July 25-Aug. 15

Franklin

Youngsville

7/30/2017: 11 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Youngsville Masonic Lodge #377, 110 W. Main Street

_______________

Granville

Creedmoor

7/28/2017: 2:30 p.m. – 7 p.m., Creedmoor United Methodist Church, 214 Park Avenue

8/8/2017: 11:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., South Branch Library, 1550 S. Campus Drive

Oxford

8/1/2017: 10:30 a.m. – 3 p.m., The Thornton Branch, 210 Main Street

_______________

Person

Hurdle Mills

8/13/2017: 12 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Walnut Grove United Methodist Church, 7215 Walnut Grove Church Road

Roxboro

7/27/2017: 1:30 p.m. – 6 p.m., National Guard Armory, 605 Burlington Rd

8/7/2017: 2 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Person Family Medical & Dental Center, 702 N. Main St.

8/10/2017: 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., Person County Human Services Building, 355 A South Madison Blvd

8/11/2017: 11 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Roxboro Police Department, 109 Lamar St.

Vance

Henderson

8/2/2017: 12 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., MR Williams, 235 Raleigh Rd

_______________

What to know about giving blood

To make an appointment or more information, simply download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

Blood donors can now save time at their next donation by using RapidPass to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, prior to arriving at the blood drive. To get started and learn more, visit redcrossblood.org/RapidPass and follow the instructions on the site.

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

*Restrictions apply. Additional information and details are available at redcrossblood.org/summer. The Bullseye Design, Target and Target GiftCard are registered trademarks of Target Brands, Inc. Terms and conditions are applied to gift cards. Target is not a participating partner in or sponsor of this offer.

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Boys and Girls Club Offers Summer Update

Vance County

According to the Old Chinese Proverb “Tell me, I’ll forget. Show me, I may remember. But involve me, and I’ll understand.” The Boys & Girls Clubs of North Central NC Vance Unit are delighted to share that our  2017 Summer Program participants have had a visit from a slew of community representatives  that range from Nutritionist , Military (Army & Navy), Youth of the Year, and Henderson Fire Department.

Anticipating that the Members will be inspired at this young and hoping that some may remember down the road and get involved. Members are looking forward to meeting and talking with our remaining line up of guest.

Featured here our most recent visitor Lieutenant Corey Adams City of Henderson Fire Department Division of Fire Prevention.

Granville County

Summer is always a blast & our members love a wide array of activities. Swimming & dodgeball top their lists, but BGCNCNC wanted to focus on leadership among our older youth this summer.

One of the highlights of our summer has been our partnership with the Penn Ave Soup Kitchen. At the BGC, we are teaching our middle schoolers & high schoolers that they are role models for our younger youth & our community. It has been so exciting to see our teens step up & serve the community. We are so proud to be a place for them to learn & grow. Below, you will see our youth preparing plates & assisting the soup kitchen with their set up.

Warren County

The club kids at Warren County enjoyed our “Around the World” Summer Camp.  We studied France, Mexico, South Africa and Japan! We learned about the culture, landmarks, food, currency, and language of each country.

Each student received a Camp Passport to virtually travel to each country.

Students also enjoyed various field trips.  We visited Aycock Recreation Center for swimming, Market Place Cinema, the Skateeum, and Galaxy Fun Park in Raleigh.

Franklin County

The Franklin Club has been busy this summer! With ages ranging from 5 to 16 all members have been actively participating in Summer Brain Gain each day.

Members participating in hands on activities focusing on leadership, decision making, innovators, and the invention of bubble gum!! Members also enjoyed field trips to swim at Aycock Recreation Center, Brooks St. Bowl, and Jellybeans Skatteum! Members have also enjoyed water relay races, water balloon fights,
and water contests!

Halifax County

We have learned how to stay safe this summer; we have learned how important it is to keep moving.

We have traveled the world, China, Italy, Fiji, France and Mexico only to discover how proud we are to be Americans.

Even with all that we still have plenty of adventures left ahead of us this summer;  more visits to the pool, more art, learning to cook and so much more!!

Granville Chamber, Granville Health System and Masonic Home for Children to Host New Teacher Breakfast

The Granville County Chamber of Commerce and Granville Health System are sponsoring the annual New Teacher Breakfast on Friday, August 18th at 7:30 am in the cafeteria at the Masonic Home for Children – Oxford. This event welcomes and recognizes new employees to the Granville County School system and allows them an opportunity to meet local elected officials, as well as  business and agency leaders in Granville County.

Presiding will be Kyle Puryear, President of the Chamber, with remarks from Dr. Lee Isley, Chief Executive Officer of Granville Health System, event sponsor.

Granville County Chamber banks, real estate, property management and insurance members are being invited to set up business displays to provide information for the newcomers.  Chamber of Commerce member businesses contribute items for gift bags for the 100 new teacher employees.  Businesses interested in donating gift bag items should contact either of the Chamber’s offices – Toni Anne Wheeler, 919.528.4994, [email protected] or Wanda Garrett, 919.693.6125, [email protected].

New EMS training program to be offered at VGCC

Vance-Granville Community College will soon expand its Emergency Medical Services training options to include the internationally-recognized Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program.

Developed by the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians in cooperation with the American College of Surgeons’ Committee on Trauma, PHTLS is the leading continuing education program for prehospital emergency trauma care. The stated mission of PHTLS is “to promote excellence in trauma patient management by all providers involved in the delivery of prehospital care through global education.” The courses are intended to improve the quality of trauma care and, in turn, to save patients whose lives are in danger before they can reach the hospital. 

PHTLS promotes critical thinking as the foundation for providing quality care. It is based on the belief that, given a good foundation of knowledge and key principles, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) practitioners are capable of making reasoned decisions regarding patient care. The PHTLS course is continuously updated and revised to keep up with advances in the field.

“Adding this program will help our local responders have a better understanding of trauma and how to treat the patient,” said Stephen Barney, VGCC’s coordinator/instructor for EMS Programs. “It will bring students up to the national standard of trauma care. This will allow providers to give better care to patients.”

There are several different PHTLS courses, which, Barney said, VGCC will offer as needed, starting in the fall. The offerings include a 16-hour “Provider Course” for emergency medical responders, EMTs, Paramedics, nurses, physician assistants and physicians; an 8-hour “Refresher Course” for individuals who have successfully completed the PHTLS provider course within the past four years; a four-hour “Instructor Update,” and an 8-hour “PHTLS for First Responders” course for emergency medical responders, police officers, firefighters, rescue personnel and safety officers to prepare for rendering care to trauma patients until EMS personnel arrive. Barney said that VGCC will become one of several North Carolina community colleges offering PHTLS, while many others use the “International Trauma Life Support” training course.

VGCC offers EMS training from the basic to the Paramedic level, in addition to continuing education. For more information, call Stephen Barney at (252) 738-3273.

–VGCC–

Thirty Seven Domestic Violence Related Homicides Reported in NC in 2017

From January 1 to July 2, 2017, there have been 37 Homicides as a direct result of Domestic Violence in North Carolina, according to the North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

THIS HAS TO STOP!

If you or someone you know is a victim of Domestic Violence, please call FAMILIES LIVING VIOLENCE FREE.

919-693-5700 or Hispanic line 919-690-0888 anytime day or night, 7 days a week.

You could be saving a life…may be your own.

 

Peggy Roark

Adult & Empowerment Services

Families Living Violence Free

125 Oxford Outer Loop Road

PO Box 1632

Oxford, NC 27565

Office: 919-693-3579

Crisis: 919-693-5700

Website: www.flvf.org

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Keep Independence Day celebrations safe with these fire-safety tips

RALEIGH – Officials with the N.C. Forest Service encourage people to celebrate Independence Day by viewing public fireworks displays rather than risk starting fires with their own fireworks.

“The careless use of sparklers, fountains, glow worms, smoke devices, trick noisemakers and other Class C fireworks can cause wildfires,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “Each year, wildfires in North Carolina endanger people, destroy millions of dollars’ worth of timber and property, and damage the environment.”

If people use their own fireworks, here are some safety tips:

  • Don’t use fireworks such as ground spinners, firecrackers, round spinners, Roman candles, bottle rockets and mortars, which are illegal in North Carolina.
  • Do not use fireworks near woods or any combustible material.
  • Make sure fireworks are always used with adult supervision.
  • Follow the instructions provided with the fireworks.
  • Do not use fireworks while under the influence of alcohol.
  • Always use in a large, open and, preferably, paved area or near a body of water.
  • Have a rake or shovel and a bucket or two of water on hand.
  • Monitor the area for several hours after use.

With more homes being built in wooded areas, it’s important to take extra precautions to prevent wildfires in residential areas, said State Forester David Lane. “In addition to taking measures to use fireworks safely, campfires or grills should never be left unattended and should never be started with gasoline,” Lane said.

Ashes should be doused in water and stirred. Repeat this process to ensure the ashes are cold. Never put ashes in a paper bag or other flammable container, but instead place them in an outside metal container or bury them in mineral soil in a garden. Never store ashes in a garage, on a deck or in a wooded area. Double-check ashes and coals before throwing them away to make sure they won’t start a fire.

Missing Teenager Reported in Henderson

The Henderson Police Department request your assistance in locating the following missing person.

BRANDON WILLIAMS
Age 16
DOB 04/20/2001
Black Male
4’ 5
100 lbs
Black hair/ Brown eyes
Last scene 06/09/2017 around 8:00AM

3 easy steps to becoming a Red Cross summer blood donor

June 13, 2017– The American Red Cross urges eligible donors to give blood this summer for hospital patients in need and offers three easy steps people can take to help save lives.

  1. Schedule – Use the free Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to make an appointment.
  2. Prepare – Get a good night’s sleep, eat a nutritious meal and drink extra fluids.
  3. Give – The donation process start to finish takes about an hour. The actual donation only takes about 10 minutes.

Only about 3 percent of the U.S. population gives blood, which means a heavy reliance on repeat donors to maintain a sufficient blood supply. New blood donors are especially needed during the summer months because many schools where blood drives are held – and where new donors give – are not in session, and current donors often delay giving due to summer vacations.

Patients like Anna Schuster might not be here without generous volunteer blood donors. Doctors gave Schuster a 1 percent chance of survival after a collision with a semitrailer. During the first 12 hours after her accident, she received 65 units of blood. Schuster’s road to recovery has been long – 58 surgeries in the 12 years since her accident, including four in the past 14 months, with many of them requiring more blood transfusions.

Every day there are thousands of patients like Schuster who rely on lifesaving blood donations. That’s why donors are urged to give now and give often.

In June, the Red Cross joins blood collection agencies around the world marking World Blood Donor Day by raising awareness about the need for a readily available blood supply. Make an appointment to donate blood by downloading the free Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting redcrossblood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Donors can make an even greater impact by inviting others to join them in giving.

Upcoming blood donation opportunities:

Granville

Oxford

6/21/2017: 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., Oxford Baptist Church, 147 Main Street

6/27/2017: 10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m., Granville Health System, 1010 College St

 

 

Person

Roxboro

6/23/2017: 3 p.m. – 7:30 p.m., Moose Lodge 2005, 480 Burlington Rd

 

Vance

Henderson

6/16/2017: 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m., John T Church Building, 566 Ruin Creek Rd

_______________

How to help

Simply download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

Blood donors can now save time at their next donation by using RapidPass to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, prior to arriving at the blood drive. To get started and learn more, visit redcrossblood.org/RapidPass and follow the instructions on the site.

Volunteers needed

Another way to support the lifesaving mission of the American Red Cross is to become a volunteer transportation specialist and deliver lifesaving blood products to local area hospitals. Volunteer transportation specialists play a very important role in ensuring an ample blood supply for patients in need by transporting blood and blood products. For more information and to apply for a volunteer transportation specialist position visit rdcrss.org/driver.

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

Troxler encourages horse owners to vaccinate against EEE

RALEIGH – Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler is encouraging North Carolina horse owners to have their animals vaccinated against Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis.

“Triple E is a mosquito-borne disease that causes inflammation or swelling of the brain and spinal cord in equine and is usually fatal,” Troxler said. “The disease is preventable by vaccination.”

There were nine recorded cases of EEE in horses in North Carolina in 2016, but the mild winter could cause that number to go up this year, State Veterinarian Doug Meckes said.

Symptoms of EEE include impaired vision, aimless wandering, head pressing, circling, inability to swallow, irregular staggering gait, paralysis, convulsions and death. Once a horse has been bitten by an infected mosquito, it may take three to 10 days for symptoms to appear.

“If your horses or other equine animals exhibit any symptoms of EEE, contact your veterinarian immediately,” Meckes said.

Meckes recommends that equine owners talk to their veterinarians about an effective vaccination protocol to protect horses from EEE and another mosquito-borne disease, West Nile virus. The combo vaccination initially requires two shots, 30 days apart, for horses, mules and donkeys that have no prior vaccination history. Meckes recommends a booster shot every six months.

Mosquitoes can breed in any puddle that lasts for more than four days, so removing any source of standing water can reduce the chance of exposing animals to WNV or EEE. Keeping horses in stalls at night, using insect screens and fans and turning off lights after dusk can also help reduce exposure to mosquitoes. Insect repellants can be effective if used according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

People, horses and birds can become infected from a bite by a mosquito carrying the diseases, but there is no evidence that horses can transmit the viruses to other horses, birds or people through direct contact.

VGCC Pharmacy Technology students serve community

Students in the Pharmacy Technology program at Vance-Granville Community College have been participating in a unique “community pharmacy practice” clinical rotation at a Granville County nonprofit organization.

Under the supervision of Pharmacy Technology Program Head Dr. Erica Fleming, students completed part of their clinical rotation at Area Congregations in Ministry (ACIM) in Oxford on Fridays during the spring semester. The students provided health services for ACIM clients such as blood pressure checks, diabetes risk assessments and medication therapy services, while also providing information on vital health issues, stroke awareness and chronic disease state management.

The mission of ACIM, an organization made up of Granville County churches and faith-based organizations, is to provide food and other resources and services to Granville County citizens in need. In addition to food items, ACIM is able to provide financial assistance for housing and utilities to clients who meet certain eligibility requirements.

This marked the fourth semester that VGCC students have worked with clients at ACIM. Sue Hinman, ACIM’s executive director, said the partnership with the college is the first of its kind for her organization. “This partnership is awesome,” Hinman said. “My clients are getting to know the students, and it makes a huge difference that our clients know that there is someone they can talk to and get information about medications, so that they can take better care of themselves.” She added that by collaborating with the Pharmacy Technology students and faculty, she and her volunteers have also gained a better understanding of the medications that their clients are taking.

Fleming said that the partnership is helping not only the community, but also the students. “Rotating here is an example of community pharmacy practice,” she said. “We want to expose our students to this area in the field of pharmacy and expand their perspective. This experience gives students another way to apply what they learn in class. It’s a good way to learn about various diseases, because we never know what we are going to encounter.” Fleming said students sometimes need to research problems that clients have and come back the next week to offer them possible solutions. “We screen people for diabetes and high blood pressure and counsel them on their medications,” she said. “We also provide them with information about services that can help them pay for prescriptions, like NC MedAssist.”

Fleming added that through her program’s “Rx 4 Life” project, her students give each ACIM client a handy medication card that they can keep in their pocket. On the card, clients can make a list of all their medications, the reasons they use them and when to take them. The card also has spaces for important phone numbers and other information.

“The purpose of the project is to empower patients to take an active role in managing their medications, to increase patient medication knowledge, to optimize medication use to improve therapeutic outcomes for patients and to provide patients with a portable medication record,” Fleming said. Another card that students created and distributed to clients has information on the signs of stroke, as well as the client’s target weight, cholesterol levels, blood pressure and blood glucose. Awareness of the targets for these major risk factors of stroke gives patients specific areas to focus on when setting health care goals. Spaces on the card allow them to track their actual data over time.

Fleming said that overall, the ACIM partnership has helped her program “to develop community ties and promote awareness of us as a resource.” She estimated that her students have seen almost 400 clients to date.

Tamika Everett of Creedmoor, one of the spring semester students, recalled one remarkable incident. “We had a client who lived by herself,” Everett said. “She came in to receive services from ACIM, not intending to visit us, but she saw us and came over.” The students checked her blood pressure and were shocked to find that her systolic blood pressure number was over 220, which generally indicates a life-threatening hypertensive crisis.

Fleming notified the client’s primary care provider and immediate family members, and then took her to a nearby emergency room for monitoring and treatment. “We’re glad we were able to help her, because who knows what would have happened?” Everett wondered. Fleming said that is just one dramatic example of how area residents visit ACIM because of one particular need but end up receiving help with other needs, including health and medication management issues.

For information on volunteering at ACIM, call (919) 690-0961. For more information on the VGCC Pharmacy Technology program, call Dr. Fleming at (252) 738-3482.

–VGCC–