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VGCC students awarded Golden LEAF scholarships

A group of VGCC students recently received scholarships through the Golden LEAF Scholarship program for the North Carolina Community College System. The scholarship program, designed to help North Carolinians attend the state’s community colleges, is funded through a $750,000 grant from the Golden LEAF Foundation.

The scholarship can be used to assist with tuition, books, fees, supplies, transportation and childcare expenses related to attending classes during the 2016-17 academic year, and industry-recognized credential testing expenses that address skill gaps upon course completion. Eligible students must demonstrate financial need and reside in rural counties that are tobacco-dependent and/or economically distressed. Scholarships for both occupational (continuing education) and curriculum students are available during the fall, spring and summer semesters.

The VGCC students who were awarded Golden LEAF scholarships for the fall 2016 semester (with their respective programs of study) include:

 

  • Sally Alston of Louisburg (Associate in Arts);
  • Jennifer Bauduin of Louisburg (Associate in General Education – General Science);
  • Sonia Bishop of Stem (Computer Technology Integration – Networking and Security Technologies);
  • Taylor Crisp of Warrenton (Associate Degree Nursing);
  • Catherine Demming of Oxford (Criminal Justice);
  • Emory Gant-Hawkins of Henderson (Business Administration);
  • Latosha Hunt of Oxford (Business Administration);
  • Quiana Miller-Fisher of Henderson (Human Services Technology); and
  • Kimberly Vargo of Oxford (Associate in Arts)

 

“The Golden LEAF Foundation is proud to have awarded over 11,800 Golden LEAF Scholarships to help North Carolinians attend our state’s community colleges,” said Dan Gerlach, Golden LEAF president. “Our hope is that these scholarships will help build the talent, knowledge and skills of our current and future workforce, which are in demand by industry, especially in the rural areas of our state.”

The Golden LEAF Foundation is a nonprofit organization established in 1999 to help transform North Carolina’s economy. The foundation receives one-half of North Carolina’s funds from the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement with cigarette manufacturers and places special emphasis on assisting tobacco-dependent, economically distressed and/or rural communities across the state. The Golden LEAF Foundation works in partnership with governmental entities, educational institutions, economic development organizations and nonprofits to achieve its mission. The foundation has awarded 1,346 grants totaling more than $591 million since its inception. For more information about the foundation, visit www.goldenleaf.org or call (888) 684-8404.

Students interested in applying for a Golden LEAF Scholarship should contact the VGCC Financial Aid Office at (252) 738-3280.

 

–VGCC–

Cabinet Making course offered at VGCC

Vance-Granville Community College has scheduled a “Fundamentals of Cabinet Making” course, to be held Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m., March 6 through May 23, on the college’s Main Campus in Vance County.

This course introduces students to the carpentry trade and provides basic information needed to construct and apply finishes to custom cabinetry. Students will learn about proper safety techniques, equipment, building materials, blueprint reading, floor systems, wall systems, ceiling and roof framing, ceiling joists, envelope systems, wood-joining techniques, cabinet doors, shelves and hardware.

The instructor for the course is Richard Wells.

Students will receive NCCER (National Center for Construction Education and Research) certification upon successful completion of the course. NCCER is a national construction education foundation whose credentials are recognized across the country.

The cost of this course is $185.25 plus the cost of textbooks.

Registration can be completed online at www.vgcc.edu/oex or in person at any VGCC campus.

For more information, contact VGCC at [email protected] or (252) 738-3324.

–VGCC–

Cast, crew announced for VGCC Dinner Theater production of “The Glass Menagerie”

Vance-Granville Community College has announced an upcoming production of “The Glass Menagerie,” the Tennessee Williams classic, for the college’s fifth annual Dinner Theater.

The cast and crew have also been named for the dinner theater, which is scheduled for the evenings of Thursday, April 27, and Friday, April 28, in the Civic Center on VGCC’s Main Campus in Vance County. Dinner begins at 6 p.m. each evening.

The cast is set to feature Brittney Patterson of Henderson as Amanda Wingfield; Ben Taylor of Franklinton as Tom Wingfield, her son; Samantha Hines of Henderson as Laura Wingfield, her daughter; and Jordan Bunting of Rocky Mount as Jim O’Conner, the “gentleman caller.”

Members of the crew include Chadstity Copeland of Henderson (Assistant to the Director/Stage Manager), Allison Hines of Henderson (Assistant Stage Manager/Props), Jamie McGinn of Wake Forest (Costumes/Assistant for Props), Camden Jones of Henderson (Lighting/Sound operator), Lauren Elliott of Oxford (Head of Props) and Mya Hargrove and Evan O’Geary, both of Henderson (Hair and Make-up).

All are current students at the college, except for Elliott, an alumna and VGCC staff member.

Betsy Henderson, VGCC’s Department Chair/Instructor of Humanities and Fine Arts, is the director of the play.

First staged in 1944, “The Glass Menagerie” is a “memory play” (narrated by one of the characters, recalling his experiences) and is based in part on Tennessee Williams’s own memories of his family. In 1945, the play premiered on Broadway, won the prestigious New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for the best American play of the year, and launched Williams to fame. “The Glass Menagerie” has been adapted for television twice and as a Hollywood feature film twice. It has been revived for the Broadway stage numerous times, including a new production starring Sally Field that is currently in previews. A drama of great tenderness, charm and beauty, “The Glass Menagerie” has become one of the most famous plays of the modern theatre.

The story focuses on Amanda, a “faded Southern belle” who lives in poverty in a dingy St. Louis apartment with her son, Tom, and her daughter, Laura. The crux of the action comes when Tom invites a young man of his acquaintance to eat dinner with the family. Jim, the caller, is at once pounced upon by Amanda as a possible husband for Laura.

Tickets are $30 and are scheduled to go on sale on March 22. For more information, visit www.vgcc.edu/dinnertheater.

–VGCC–

VGCC names 258 students to President’s and Dean’s Lists

Vance-Granville Community College has announced that 126 students earned President’s List and 132 earned Dean’s List academic honors for the fall semester that ended in Dec. 2016.

The President’s List recognizes students who achieved a perfect 4.0 grade-point average (GPA) while carrying a “full load” (of at least 12 credit hours) in 100-level or higher curriculum courses. To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student had to earn a GPA that was at least 3.5 but less than 4.0, and have no grade lower than “B,” while carrying a “full load” of such courses.

Fall Semester President’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

Accounting:

Sarah J. Gabriel and Ciara S. Lynch, both of Franklinton;

Wannapha N. Robinson of Louisburg;

Elizabeth D. Elliott of Youngsville.

 

Associate Degree Nursing:

Madelaine L. Sachs of Henderson;

Renee Jackson of Kittrell.

 

Associate in Arts:

Samantha J. Shannon and Tamiya R. Thomas, both of Creedmoor;

Joshua Jacobs of Durham;

Ryan W. Sharp of Franklinton;

Cristin D. Abbott, Nancy C. Bonilla, Kourtney J. Cockrell, Ashlyn K. Collier, Chadstity V. Copeland, Caroline M. Oakley, Autumn G. Outlaw, Ebony S. Robinson Solomon and Janet Rodriguez-Morales, all of Henderson;

Leslie A. Leake of Kittrell;

Marshella D. Ashby and Makayla R. Williams, both of Littleton;

Loganne S. Driver, Blake A. Massengill and Joshua W. Moody, all of Louisburg;

Kristy R. Ball, Robin L. Hill and Sydney A. Towers, all of Oxford;

Amanda B. Miller of Warrenton;

Lindsay C. Henry of Youngsville.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Tyler A. Thorp of Henderson;

Rachel H. Allen of Stem.

 

Associate in Science:

Jordan S. Ligon of Bullock;

Michael T. O’Donoghue of Fredericksburg, Va.;

Lucas R. Hamrick and Elizabeth R. Twisdale, both of Henderson;

Sovanny Taylor of Louisburg;

Alana W. Towles of Oxford;

Skylar L. Davenport, Nicholas J. Didonna, III, and Joseph A. Moore, all of Youngsville.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Michael L. Wright of Durham;

Jeremy D. Lemay, Kenneth S. McConnell and Jacob F. Mosley, all of Henderson;

Jordan A. Alston of Louisburg;

Travis L. Keeton of Oxford;

Stephen B. Ray of Wake Forest.

 

Business Administration:

Korena L. Weichel of Creedmoor;

Roy A. Satterwhite of Henderson;

Stacy T. Hicks, Latosha C. Hunt, David L. Nicholson and Meghan J. Rossi, all of Oxford;

Jason L. Thompson of Stem.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Andrew S. Dawson of Henderson.

 

Computer Technology Integration – IT Support Track:

Tristin McClay of Creedmoor;

Max N. Moore, Jr., of Henderson.

 

Computer Technology Integration – Networking and Security Technologies Track:

Andrew A. Dadson of Butner;

Christina D. Manz of Creedmoor.

 

Computer Technology Integration – Web Design and Support Track:

Angelica M. Garcia-Avelar of Durham;

Rowan M. Morris of Warrenton.

 

Cosmetology:

Cassie A. Shaffer of Butner;

Christianne Combs of Durham;

Katrina W. Collie of Franklinton;

Micaela B. Crowder of Henderson;

Kristina M. Brantley and Kathryn L. Overby, both of Louisburg;

Kierra N. Richardson of Macon;

Myranda L. Carroll of Norlina.

 

Criminal Justice:

Christopher L. Davis of Bullock;

Martin A. Spencer of Creedmoor;

Monica A. Williams of Franklinton;

Andrew J. Shultz of Henderson;

Benjamin B. Layton of Kittrell;

Safwan A. Ali of Louisburg;

Chance S. Hayes of Louisburg;

Alissa J. Cheek of Wake Forest.

 

Culinary Arts:

Rebecca N. Groover of Franklinton;

Randy D. Bullock and Dejah Davis, both of Stem.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Kimberly C. Cagney of Creedmoor;

Bianca E. Garrett of Franklinton;

Jacquella S. Jones of Henderson;

Brooklyn E. Mason of Louisburg.

 

Electronics Engineering Technology:

George C. Williams of Louisburg.

 

Entrepreneurship:

Raeann Johnson of Henderson.

 

Global Logistics and Distribution Management Technology:

Charles Braswell of Raleigh.

 

Human Services Technology:

Fredesvinda C. Euceda-Col of Creedmoor.

 

Information Technology:

Andrew B. Benedict and Dustin L. Starnes, both of Henderson;

Cody R. Parrott of Kittrell;

Austin H. Smith of Oxford.

 

Mechatronics Engineering Technology:

Charles J. Nordcliff of Creedmoor;

Thomas K. Boyd of Henderson.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Cassidy B. Lucas of Franklinton;

Morrisha K. Alston, Tranita N. Brown and April B. Peoples, all of Henderson;

Beverly K. Ellis of Kittrell;

Kristie L. Brough of Oxford;

Amber S. Carey of Stem;

Rebecca T. George of Warrenton;

Julia A. Rhodes of Youngsville.

 

Office Administration:

Angela M. Hayes of Louisburg.

 

Paralegal Technology:

April M. Thompson of Henderson;

Holly H. Cashwell of Wake Forest;

Heather C. Bryant of Youngsville.

 

Pharmacy Technology:

Tommy L. Hicks of Franklinton.

 

Radiography:

Anna P. Tilley of Creedmoor;

Sabrina D. Johnson of Louisburg;

Kristel L. Dehart and Aaron J. McNeill, both of Oxford;

James A. Lea of Timberlake;

Jamisha D. Twitty of Warrenton.

 

Welding Technology:

Nicholas Keeton of Bullock;

Cedric J. Rodebaugh, II, of Franklinton;

Galen D. Wilds of Granville County;

Donnie S. Ayscue and Eduardo Ibarra-Renteria, both of Henderson;

Ethan T. Bailey, Christopher M. Kearney and Robert L. Mallory, all of Oxford;

David A. Jeanblanc of Raleigh;

Jared Q. Siemers of Wake Forest;

Andrew Lynam of Youngsville.

 

Fall Semester Dean’s List honorees are listed below by program of study and then by residence.

 

Accounting:

Holly A. Waddell of Henderson;

Jennifer M. Burton of Norlina.

 

Associate Degree Nursing:

Caitlin E. Moen of Cary;

Heather J. Floyd of Franklinton;

Rachel A. Edwards of Louisburg;

Talia M. Dyce and Sharon N. Ray, both of Oxford;

Sandra H. Enloe of Stem;

Brooke A. Hursey and Kayla D. Roberson, both of Wake Forest.

 

Associate Degree Nursing LPN to ADN Program:

Ashley B. Jones of Bullock.

 

Associate in Arts:

Kaleb S. Williamson of Bullock;

Tiffany Martinez of Butner;

Farrah B. Foster, Robert C. Hurt, Janella A. Mendivil and Owen T. Mettam, all of Creedmoor;

Poppy T. Boze, Rebekah H. Glasheen, Robert D. Osborne, Benjamin P. Taylor and Richard K. Washington, all of Franklinton;

Celene Acuna, Jasmine N. Allen, Anthony M. Henderson, Lynn M. Henderson, II, Alexandra J. Saravia, Brian J. Stevenson, Jakayla M. Thorpe and Bailee E. Tippett, all of Henderson;

Lillian D. Kanouff and Allie R. Beach, both of Kittrell;

Asia M. Green of Norlina;

Cecilia E. Barrenechea, Sonia M. Hernandez, Emely K. Ovando, Kimberly M. Spence and Thomas S. Thompson, all of Oxford;

Ashleigh V. Dannemiller of Raleigh;

Kamden E. Thompson of Stem;

Casey P. Hunter and Clay D. Walters, both of Wake Forest;

Sarah A. Boone of Warrenton.

 

Associate in General Education – General Science:

Paige D. Snider of Creedmoor;

Taylor M. Moseley of Henderson;

Danny W. Ayscue of Kittrell;

Stormi M. Abernathy of Leasburg;

Megan I. Proctor of Macon;

Marina E. Rombout of Stem.

 

Associate in Science:

Lindsey R. Perry of Henderson;

Kia S. Brodie of Louisburg;

Sara A. Abdulla, Nicole F. Bowman, Zakaria I. Kassim and Francis C. Scotland, all of Oxford;

Micah C. Roberts of Stem;

Kellyann M. Cook of Stovall.

 

Automotive Systems Technology:

Blake A. Larcade of Oxford.

 

Bioprocess Technology:

Kimberly A. Prevette of Oxford.

 

Business Administration:

Andrew J. Cagney and Bobbie J. Wilkerson, both of Creedmoor;

Angela Burrell    and Alfredo Picaz, both of Henderson;

Mark A. Alston of Manson;

Jason D. Hester of Oxford;

Dar-Neshia S. Williams of Warrenton;

Ashley M. Kinton of Youngsville.

 

Computer Technology Integration:

Steven J. Lynch of Norlina.

 

Computer Technology Integration – IT Support Track:

Quinton McDonald of Henderson.

 

Computer Technology Integration – Web Design and Support Track:

Amie E. Hilton of Oxford.

 

Cosmetology:

Jessica K. Lovegrove of Creedmoor;

Brittany D. Pickering of Durham;

Davis B. Moore of Franklinton;

Hannah C. Beckwith of Henderson;

Angela M. Alexander of Kittrell;

Melissa D. Sweeney of Louisburg;

Crystal L. Carrington, Loukita C. Meadows and Katy S. Perdomo, all of Oxford;

Jordan G. Reina of Roxboro;

Maria G. Ordonez Santiago of Warrenton;

Kristina F. Graham and Nancy H. Paduchowski, both of Youngsville.

 

Criminal Justice:

Tyler L. Hughes of Bullock;

Charmaine A. Sutton of Louisburg;

Dustin L. Hodnett and Harold T. Todd, both of Oxford;

Vickie A. Crawley of Roxboro.

 

Early Childhood Education:

Jessica R. Bolton and Makala West, both of Henderson;

Catherine G. Jones of Youngsville.

 

Entrepreneurship:

Austin R. Lovegrove of Franklinton.

 

Human Services Technology:

Sonya J. Barnes of Henderson.

 

Human Services Technology/Gerontology:

Larecia R. Bullock of Oxford.

 

Information Technology:

Mitchell L. Greene and Nathan E. Johnston, both of Creedmoor;

Brandon J. Carver of Durham;

Genifer R. Gibson of Fayetteville;

Kasey R. Owens of Henderson;

Kassidy L. Holtzman of Norlina;

Tina M. Kreidler and Alisha M. Prevette, both of Oxford;

Nathan L. Garrard of Stem.

 

Medical Assisting:

Dajane G. Johnson of Henderson.

 

Medical Office Administration:

Melanie Lugo-Nieves of Creedmoor;

Raven K. Kay and Raini Williams, both of Henderson;

Brianna N. Lynch of Hollister;

Misty R. Grabowski of Louisburg;

Tina M. Hatcher and Anthony M. Wade, both of Oxford;

Thomas M. King, Jr., of Wise.

 

Office Administration:

Mary A. Elberson of Henderson;

Mary Cox of Oxford.

 

Paralegal Technology:

Kelly D. Persinger of Louisburg;

Lindsay E. Brown of Oxford.

 

Radiography:

Ashley B. Storer of Creedmoor;

Trevor M. Houston of Durham;

Mary E. Brewer, Kelsey P. Hight, Kara Siena S. Reese and Madalyne N. Woods, all of Henderson;

Kaitlyn B. Sumner of Hurdle Mills;

Chelsea J. Flaxcomb of Kittrell;

Maricela Carbajal, Mary D. Currin and Jonathan T. Liddane, all of Oxford;

Jaime L. Wilson of Raleigh;

Morgan H. Keith of Stem.

 

Welding Technology:

Hernan J. Hernandez of Castalia;

Eric L. Clayton and Keodric D. Grant, both of Oxford.

 

–VGCC–

VGCC receives Perkins career training grant

Vance-Granville Community College has been awarded a $181,631 grant for the current academic year under the federal Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006. These funds are being used to support students enrolled in VGCC’s workforce-oriented programs with student success coaches and the modernization and expansion of career-training equipment.

A portion of the funds support personnel at VGCC’s Student Success Centers, who serve as advisers to work with students in Business and Applied Technologies programs throughout their training — from enrollment to completion. The college also provides industry-advised faculty development to keep instructors up-to-date on the latest technologies through the grant funding.

“In conjunction with other grants and funding sources, the Perkins grant enhances our ability to educate, inspire and support students in technical fields, which are so vital to our college mission and to the economic health of our region,” said Dr. Stelfanie Williams, president of VGCC. “With help from this grant, our outstanding faculty and staff in career-oriented programs give students the practical training they need to succeed in the workforce.”

Perkins funds allow classes at all four VGCC campuses to have up-to-date career training equipment, including a manikin/wig dryer and, soon, a state-of-the-art facial imaging machine for Cosmetology students, drill presses for Welding trainees and 26 new webcams to continue to expand VGCC’s award-winning online course offerings.

Efforts to provide apprenticeships and to educate high school students about careers in advanced manufacturing also received a boost from Perkins funding.

The Perkins Act is the principal source of federal funding to states for the improvement of secondary and postsecondary career and technical education (CTE) programs. The North Carolina Community College System, which administers Perkins funds through competitive grants to the 58 community colleges in the state, also provides extensive training to faculty throughout the year and, publicly, on their newly launched teacher-training portal at www.nc-net.info.

“Funding through Perkins and other workforce grants currently at work on VGCC campuses are positioning us well for the expected job growth in our region,” according to Kaine Riggan, VGCC’s grants coordinator. “Perkins funds are expected to shift more towards work-based learning, and we are stocked, staffed and ready for it.”

Riggan added that with a healthy number of local manufacturing jobs and a comfortable commute to the Research Triangle Park area, the four counties served by VGCC have been a favored investment for federal workforce development funds in recent years.

For more information on VGCC Business & Applied Technologies programs, contact Dean Angela Gardner-Ragland at [email protected] or (252) 738-3226.

–VGCC–

VGCC Male Mentoring Success Story: Chris Blue

Christopher Blue of Henderson is an outstanding representative of the purpose of the Vance-Granville Community College Male Mentoring Success Initiative (MMSI), which seeks to guide and support male students to graduate or transfer to a four-year university. This year, Blue is set to do both: he is on track to graduate from the college with two degrees in May 2017, at around the same time as he graduates from Vance County Early College High School, and then, he plans to transfer to East Carolina University.

“I’ve enjoyed so many things about the male mentoring program and the opportunities that the program has presented to me,” Blue reflected. “An example is the trip to Atlanta with the mentoring program in 2016. I learned so many new things, while making relationships with new people in the group. We have become practically brothers throughout the years of being in the program.” The educational tour included stops at universities and historic sites such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s boyhood home.

Blue has served in the office of Recorder/Treasurer for the male mentoring program and was honored with the program’s PRIDE Award for Engagement in 2016.

Blue’s mother, Tamara Neal, is a graduate of the VGCC Associate Degree Nursing program. “So I knew that VGCC was going to be a great place, and after five years, I can honestly say they didn’t disappoint,” Blue said. “VGCC has given me so much over the years, and I truly appreciate it.”

Blue was honored as “Youth of the Year” by the Boys & Girls Clubs of North Central North Carolina in 2016. In that capacity, he has had opportunities to speak to the Henderson Rotary Club and to represent area Boys & Girls Clubs at their statewide convention in Asheville. Blue said that through the local Boys & Girls Club, he has developed his communication and leadership skills. Boys & Girls Clubs Vance County Unit Director Evelyn Taylor was quoted in The Daily Dispatch as saying, “Chris is working to make his community better by providing a positive example for the younger children of our club. He assists them with their homework and is a great example to them of what a responsible teen looks like and acts like.”

Also in 2016, Blue participated in the Governor’s Page Program in Raleigh. “This was a great experience because I was able to learn more about how government works firsthand,” he said.

Soon, Blue plans to transfer to East Carolina University and major in Public Health with Pre-Health professions. “Afterwards, I plan to go to dental school to become a Prosthodontist,” a dentist who specializes in the esthetic restoration and replacement of teeth, Blue added.

“Christopher has proven himself to be a young man of integrity,” said Anthony Pope, co-coordinator of the MMSI. “His dedication to the MMSI has served as an example for other Early College mentees. I am certain that he will excel in accomplishing the goals that he has set for himself.”

For more information on the male mentoring initiative, contact co-coordinators Anthony Pope at [email protected] or (252) 738-3395, or Michael Farmer at [email protected] or (252) 738-3234.

–VGCC–

VGCC surpasses $6 million in grant funding with new initiative

Vance-Granville Community College’s Grants Office has now surpassed $6 million in funding to support students, the VGCC Board of Trustees was informed on Monday night, Jan. 23, at its regular bimonthly meeting on Main Campus.

In its brief four-year history, the Grants Office has secured 37 grants totaling $6,053,883, according to Dr. Ken Lewis, Vance-Granville’s vice president of institutional research and technology.

Among the largest grants, $1,757,299 from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) Grant Program is the single largest competitive grant award received in the history of the college. TAACCCT supports the development of innovative training programs for advanced manufacturing careers. The college started its Mechatronics program and expanded its Welding program through the grant.

The Advanced Manufacturing Skills Training Alliance (AMSTA) with the four public school systems in the college’s coverage area was created with a $1.2 million grant from the North Carolina Education and Workforce Innovation Fund. In addition, $460,000 has been awarded to the Training Alliance by the Golden LEAF Foundation, along with grants of $245,923 and $237,757 from the Duke Energy Foundation to purchase state-of-the-art equipment.

And, most recently, VGCC was awarded nearly $1 million from the U.S. Department of Labor to launch the North Carolina TechHire Program to train students in information technology and advanced manufacturing programs.

 

In addition to the TechHire grant, Dr. Lewis said the most recent awards include:

  • A pair of Male Mentoring Success Initiative grants over two years, totaling $34,000, to help students stay in school and on track to graduate or transfer to a four-year university;
  • A Wake Electric grant of $3,000 to fund classroom technology;
  • An NC Works Career Coach grant of $17,000 in partnership with the Granville and Warren County school systems to promote college attendance and Career & College Promise (CCP) classes in the high schools;
  • A Perkins grant, $181,000, supporting the college’s Business and Applied Technologies and Health Sciences curriculum programs;
  • A Library Services and Technology Act planning grant of $23,000 for space utilization upgrades;
  • A Cannon Foundation grant of $150,000 to complete renovation of Main Campus Building 10;
  • A National Summer Transportation Institute grant from the Federal Highway Administration, $37,000, allowing high school students in Warren County to learn more about career opportunities in transportation-related industries; and
  • A Taste of Industry grant of $10,000 from the North Carolina Community College System to support AMSTA in conjunction with Granville County Schools.

 

The grants update was included in the report of the Curriculum Committee, chaired by Barbara Cates Harris. In the committee’s reports, Dr. Angela Ballentine, the college’s vice president of academic affairs, also updated the board on the annual Continuing Education and Basic Skills visitation report.

Building Improvements

The board approved recommendations of the Building Committee, chaired by Trustee Donald Seifert, ranking in priority order the firms to design and oversee exterior masonry repairs and restoration as well as HVAC replacements and fire alarm system installations. Both Main Campus projects will be funded by the Connect NC bonds approved by state voters in March 2016.

At an estimated cost of $1 million, the college plans to restore, structurally repair and waterproof building masonry roof lines, walls and building bridges that have deteriorated over time because of the penetration of water/moisture into and through the building structures. REI Engineers of Raleigh was chosen as the highest ranked firm for the masonry project.

The primary focus of the HVAC/fire alarm project, estimated to cost $4.1 million, is to replace existing deteriorated heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems with new systems that provide greater stability, control and energy efficiency, and to replace existing fire alarm systems with new addressable systems that meet state code compliance. Engineered Designs, Inc., of Cary was selected as the highest ranked firm for the project.

VGCC is receiving $7.6 million from the $2 billion Connect NC Public Improvement Bond package. Funds may be used for the repair and renovation of facilities to meet the educational needs of students and/or the construction of new facilities to expand programs and services.

Other Action

In other action:

  • The board approved Mid-Year Amendments to the 2016-2017 Budget. The adjustments were necessary to account for $1,664,312 in carryover funds from the previous year and grant funding.
  • Trustee Sara Wester, chair of the Personnel Committee, reported on new employees and resignations.
  • Trustee Opie Frazier, chair of the Investment Committee, reported a gain on the college’s investments now being managed by First Citizens Wealth Management.
  • Dr. Stelfanie Williams, VGCC’s president, updated the trustees on activities since the board last met in November. She also announced the dates of upcoming events: a Valentine’s Day Luncheon sponsored by the college’s Culinary Arts program, Feb. 16; a North Carolina Association of Community College Trustees Law and Legislative Seminar in Raleigh, March 29-31; the fifth annual Dinner Theater, April 27-28, in the Civic Center on Main Campus; the annual VGCC Endowment Fund Golf Tournament, May 2, at the Henderson Country Club; and Commencement, May 12, at the gazebo on Main Campus.

The next meeting of the Board of Trustees is set for Monday, March 20, on the Main Campus.

— END —

VGCC offers seminar on starting a new business in the New Year

The Vance-Granville Community College Small Business Center is offering a free seminar for local residents whose New Year’s resolutions include starting a small business.

“So You Think You Want to Start a Business” is scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017, from 6 until 9 p.m., in room 7109 (Building 7) on the college’s Main Campus in Vance County.

The seminar, led by instructor Bob Moore, is designed for individuals who are thinking about starting and operating their own business but wonder if they have the personality, drive, creativity, adaptability, and other talents or attributes that are associated with successful entrepreneurs.

During this seminar, attendees will honestly assess themselves in order to discover their strengths and weaknesses. The seminar will also incorporate various exercises and role-playing activities that illustrate realistic challenges encountered by entrepreneurs. Attendees will be given the opportunity to present their business ideas, and they will be shown various ways to determine if the idea is feasible and viable. After attending this seminar, if an attendee makes the decision to move forward, they will be strongly encouraged to register for seminars offered by the VGCC Small Business Center.

A graduate of Fayetteville State University, Bob Moore is a longtime small business owner and serves as director of the Small Business Center at Robeson Community College in Lumberton. He was honored as the Small Business Center Director of the Year for the entire North Carolina Community College System in 2013.

For more information and to reserve a seat in this free seminar, contact Small Business Center director Tanya Weary at [email protected] or (252) 738-3240.

Registration can be completed online at www.vgcc.edu/schedules/small-business-center.

Vance-Granville Community Band to present free holiday concert on December 5th

The Vance-Granville Community Band will perform traditional Christmas fare as well as light classical and contemporary favorites during its ninth annual holiday concert on Monday, Dec. 5, at 7:30 p.m. at McGregor Hall Performing Arts Center in Henderson.

This will be the first time that the Community Band has held a concert at the 1,000-seat venue, which opened earlier this year and is located at 201 Breckenridge Street in downtown Henderson. Admission is free of charge.

The band has prepared a program that includes seasonal music like “Wishing You a Merry Christmas,” a medley of Christmas carols arranged by William E. Rhoads; “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson; “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” a medley featuring “Welcome Christmas” and “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch”; and “The Carollers March” by R.E. Holz, arranged by band member Bob Salzmann. Another piece, “The Night Before Christmas,” features a dramatic reading of Clement Moore’s poem by the band’s Claire Ramsey, with musical accompaniment.

The band is also set to play “Pictures at an Exhibition” by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky; the overture from “Abduction from the Seraglio” by Mozart; a symphonic suite of music from the sci-fi franchise “Star Trek” to commemorate its 50th anniversary by Michael Giacchino, Alexander Courage and Gene Roddenberry; “Hallelujah” (featured in the movie “Shrek”) by Leonard Cohen; and “Riders for the Flag,” a march by John Philip Sousa.

The concert will also feature the “Old Vanguard Woodwind Quartet” playing additional selections of holiday music. The quartet comprises a bassoon, a soprano saxophone, an alto saxophone and a tenor saxophone.

Brian Miller, who retired as band director at Louisburg High School and now teaches for VGCC and Crosscreek Charter School, is the band’s primary conductor. Tracie Winstead, who plays bassoon in the band, is the associate conductor.

The Community Band, which is sponsored by the VGCC Division of Arts and Sciences, includes people of all ages, from all walks of life, and from throughout the region. No auditions are required. Rehearsals are held on Monday evenings from 7-9 p.m. at the Vance-Granville Community College Civic Center, on the Main Campus in Henderson, at Exit 209 on Interstate 85 (Poplar Creek Road). For more information, contact Brian Miller at (919) 496-5877 or at [email protected] or Betsy Henderson at [email protected].

VGCC Bioprocess program moving to Franklin Campus

The Vance-Granville Community College Bioprocess Technology degree program will be based at the college’s Franklin County Campus, starting in January 2017.

The program has been located at the college’s Main Campus in Vance County since its inception in January 2006. The biotechnology lab on Main Campus will now be used primarily by the new Histotechnology degree program instead.

The Franklin Campus, located on N.C. 56 just outside of Louisburg, has actually had a biotech lab longer than the Main Campus has. VGCC has conducted the one-semester BioWork Process Technician course in the lab on the Franklin Campus since it was first offered in 2001. Novozymes North America of Franklinton made monetary and equipment donations to the lab from the outset, and has continued to support VGCC over the years. That lab has also been used by the Bioprocess Technology curriculum degree program from time to time.

“Moving to the Franklin County Campus will strategically locate our program closer to Novozymes and other major employers in the biomanufacturing and pharmaceutical industries, while also promoting economic development in the Franklin County area,” said VGCC Bioprocess Technology program head/instructor Dr. Tara Hamilton. “We look forward to welcoming new students who want to succeed in this growing career field.”

The Bioprocess Technology curriculum is designed to prepare students to work as process operators or quality control analysts in biological products manufacturing facilities. Students receive instruction in a combination of basic science and communication skills, manufacturing technologies, and good manufacturing practices. In addition to the two-year associate in applied science degree, VGCC offers a 16-hour Bioprocess Technology certificate, which is open to eligible high school students through the Career & College Promise program.

VGCC is part of the North Carolina Community College System’s BioNetwork, a statewide initiative that connects community colleges serving the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors, providing specialized training, curricula and equipment.

Registration is going on now for the spring 2017 semester at VGCC, which begins Jan. 9. For more information on Bioprocess Technology, contact Dr. Tara Hamilton at (252) 738-3285 or [email protected].