Boys and Girls Club Offers Summer Update

Vance County

According to the Old Chinese Proverb “Tell me, I’ll forget. Show me, I may remember. But involve me, and I’ll understand.” The Boys & Girls Clubs of North Central NC Vance Unit are delighted to share that our  2017 Summer Program participants have had a visit from a slew of community representatives  that range from Nutritionist , Military (Army & Navy), Youth of the Year, and Henderson Fire Department.

Anticipating that the Members will be inspired at this young and hoping that some may remember down the road and get involved. Members are looking forward to meeting and talking with our remaining line up of guest.

Featured here our most recent visitor Lieutenant Corey Adams City of Henderson Fire Department Division of Fire Prevention.

Granville County

Summer is always a blast & our members love a wide array of activities. Swimming & dodgeball top their lists, but BGCNCNC wanted to focus on leadership among our older youth this summer.

One of the highlights of our summer has been our partnership with the Penn Ave Soup Kitchen. At the BGC, we are teaching our middle schoolers & high schoolers that they are role models for our younger youth & our community. It has been so exciting to see our teens step up & serve the community. We are so proud to be a place for them to learn & grow. Below, you will see our youth preparing plates & assisting the soup kitchen with their set up.

Warren County

The club kids at Warren County enjoyed our “Around the World” Summer Camp.  We studied France, Mexico, South Africa and Japan! We learned about the culture, landmarks, food, currency, and language of each country.

Each student received a Camp Passport to virtually travel to each country.

Students also enjoyed various field trips.  We visited Aycock Recreation Center for swimming, Market Place Cinema, the Skateeum, and Galaxy Fun Park in Raleigh.

Franklin County

The Franklin Club has been busy this summer! With ages ranging from 5 to 16 all members have been actively participating in Summer Brain Gain each day.

Members participating in hands on activities focusing on leadership, decision making, innovators, and the invention of bubble gum!! Members also enjoyed field trips to swim at Aycock Recreation Center, Brooks St. Bowl, and Jellybeans Skatteum! Members have also enjoyed water relay races, water balloon fights,
and water contests!

Halifax County

We have learned how to stay safe this summer; we have learned how important it is to keep moving.

We have traveled the world, China, Italy, Fiji, France and Mexico only to discover how proud we are to be Americans.

Even with all that we still have plenty of adventures left ahead of us this summer;  more visits to the pool, more art, learning to cook and so much more!!

New EMS training program to be offered at VGCC

Vance-Granville Community College will soon expand its Emergency Medical Services training options to include the internationally-recognized Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program.

Developed by the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians in cooperation with the American College of Surgeons’ Committee on Trauma, PHTLS is the leading continuing education program for prehospital emergency trauma care. The stated mission of PHTLS is “to promote excellence in trauma patient management by all providers involved in the delivery of prehospital care through global education.” The courses are intended to improve the quality of trauma care and, in turn, to save patients whose lives are in danger before they can reach the hospital. 

PHTLS promotes critical thinking as the foundation for providing quality care. It is based on the belief that, given a good foundation of knowledge and key principles, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) practitioners are capable of making reasoned decisions regarding patient care. The PHTLS course is continuously updated and revised to keep up with advances in the field.

“Adding this program will help our local responders have a better understanding of trauma and how to treat the patient,” said Stephen Barney, VGCC’s coordinator/instructor for EMS Programs. “It will bring students up to the national standard of trauma care. This will allow providers to give better care to patients.”

There are several different PHTLS courses, which, Barney said, VGCC will offer as needed, starting in the fall. The offerings include a 16-hour “Provider Course” for emergency medical responders, EMTs, Paramedics, nurses, physician assistants and physicians; an 8-hour “Refresher Course” for individuals who have successfully completed the PHTLS provider course within the past four years; a four-hour “Instructor Update,” and an 8-hour “PHTLS for First Responders” course for emergency medical responders, police officers, firefighters, rescue personnel and safety officers to prepare for rendering care to trauma patients until EMS personnel arrive. Barney said that VGCC will become one of several North Carolina community colleges offering PHTLS, while many others use the “International Trauma Life Support” training course.

VGCC offers EMS training from the basic to the Paramedic level, in addition to continuing education. For more information, call Stephen Barney at (252) 738-3273.

–VGCC–

Thirty Seven Domestic Violence Related Homicides Reported in NC in 2017

From January 1 to July 2, 2017, there have been 37 Homicides as a direct result of Domestic Violence in North Carolina, according to the North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

THIS HAS TO STOP!

If you or someone you know is a victim of Domestic Violence, please call FAMILIES LIVING VIOLENCE FREE.

919-693-5700 or Hispanic line 919-690-0888 anytime day or night, 7 days a week.

You could be saving a life…may be your own.

 

Peggy Roark

Adult & Empowerment Services

Families Living Violence Free

125 Oxford Outer Loop Road

PO Box 1632

Oxford, NC 27565

Office: 919-693-3579

Crisis: 919-693-5700

Website: www.flvf.org

Like us on Facebook!

Keep Independence Day celebrations safe with these fire-safety tips

RALEIGH – Officials with the N.C. Forest Service encourage people to celebrate Independence Day by viewing public fireworks displays rather than risk starting fires with their own fireworks.

“The careless use of sparklers, fountains, glow worms, smoke devices, trick noisemakers and other Class C fireworks can cause wildfires,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “Each year, wildfires in North Carolina endanger people, destroy millions of dollars’ worth of timber and property, and damage the environment.”

If people use their own fireworks, here are some safety tips:

  • Don’t use fireworks such as ground spinners, firecrackers, round spinners, Roman candles, bottle rockets and mortars, which are illegal in North Carolina.
  • Do not use fireworks near woods or any combustible material.
  • Make sure fireworks are always used with adult supervision.
  • Follow the instructions provided with the fireworks.
  • Do not use fireworks while under the influence of alcohol.
  • Always use in a large, open and, preferably, paved area or near a body of water.
  • Have a rake or shovel and a bucket or two of water on hand.
  • Monitor the area for several hours after use.

With more homes being built in wooded areas, it’s important to take extra precautions to prevent wildfires in residential areas, said State Forester David Lane. “In addition to taking measures to use fireworks safely, campfires or grills should never be left unattended and should never be started with gasoline,” Lane said.

Ashes should be doused in water and stirred. Repeat this process to ensure the ashes are cold. Never put ashes in a paper bag or other flammable container, but instead place them in an outside metal container or bury them in mineral soil in a garden. Never store ashes in a garage, on a deck or in a wooded area. Double-check ashes and coals before throwing them away to make sure they won’t start a fire.

The Crossing at Lake Gaston Coming August 12th

by Craig Hahn

The Eaton Ferry Bridge is the place to be for a morning of fun for the entire family. The Crossing begins promptly at 9 am. Registration begins at 8:00 am.

THE CROSSING is an annual event for the Lake Gaston Community and is sponsored by O’SAIL. The goal is to encourage the Lake Gaston population to annually get in the water and join others in a non-motorized crossing of the lake in mass. THE CROSSING will occur in a protected area adjacent to the Eaton Ferry Bridge secured by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary.

THE CROSSING requires registration of all participants. There is a preregistration fee of $25.00 or $30.00 the day of the event. Upon completion of the event, participants will receive complimentary fruit and water at the finish and a limited edition t-shirt. (Note: Preferred T-Shirt size cannot be guaranteed for those who register the day of the event)

The two classes of participants are:
 SWIMMERS o Under 13 years of age must have signed life guard statement that they have a proven ability to swim the distance or be accompanied by an adult throughout the swim. o Must wear swim cap for visibility, swim caps will be provided at registration check-in.  NON-MOTORIZED VESSELS o All riders must wear PFD. o Can be individual or team entry
o Can use commercial or self-made vessel. All vessels must be water sound and may be disqualified by officials at the entrance area if they are deemed to be unsafe or not able to make the distance.  THE WAVERS o Beyond the usual non-motorized water vessels, we’re encouraging you to use your imagination. The WAVER category was created to encourage small or large groups to cross together in the most creative ways possible. Some examples might be connected by noodles or even floating atop their own creation of a boat, barge, raft, etc.

How can you join the fun? Register below and show up the day of the event ready to have fun with your team and your creation. *NOTE: Registration may be completed online through 5PM, Friday 8/11. Registration the day of the event is $30.

Missing Teenager Reported in Henderson

The Henderson Police Department request your assistance in locating the following missing person.

BRANDON WILLIAMS
Age 16
DOB 04/20/2001
Black Male
4’ 5
100 lbs
Black hair/ Brown eyes
Last scene 06/09/2017 around 8:00AM

Troxler encourages horse owners to vaccinate against EEE

RALEIGH – Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler is encouraging North Carolina horse owners to have their animals vaccinated against Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis.

“Triple E is a mosquito-borne disease that causes inflammation or swelling of the brain and spinal cord in equine and is usually fatal,” Troxler said. “The disease is preventable by vaccination.”

There were nine recorded cases of EEE in horses in North Carolina in 2016, but the mild winter could cause that number to go up this year, State Veterinarian Doug Meckes said.

Symptoms of EEE include impaired vision, aimless wandering, head pressing, circling, inability to swallow, irregular staggering gait, paralysis, convulsions and death. Once a horse has been bitten by an infected mosquito, it may take three to 10 days for symptoms to appear.

“If your horses or other equine animals exhibit any symptoms of EEE, contact your veterinarian immediately,” Meckes said.

Meckes recommends that equine owners talk to their veterinarians about an effective vaccination protocol to protect horses from EEE and another mosquito-borne disease, West Nile virus. The combo vaccination initially requires two shots, 30 days apart, for horses, mules and donkeys that have no prior vaccination history. Meckes recommends a booster shot every six months.

Mosquitoes can breed in any puddle that lasts for more than four days, so removing any source of standing water can reduce the chance of exposing animals to WNV or EEE. Keeping horses in stalls at night, using insect screens and fans and turning off lights after dusk can also help reduce exposure to mosquitoes. Insect repellants can be effective if used according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

People, horses and birds can become infected from a bite by a mosquito carrying the diseases, but there is no evidence that horses can transmit the viruses to other horses, birds or people through direct contact.

Tammy Care Takes Home Maria Parham Health’s 2017 Mercy Award

Maria Parham Health recently announced that Tammy Care has been recognized as the hospital’s 2017 Mercy Award winner. The Mercy Award recognizes one employee from each of LifePoint Health’s hospitals who profoundly touches the lives of others and best represents the spirit and values on which the company was founded.

The Mercy Award is an annual recognition program established in 2002 to honor the life of Scott Mercy, LifePoint’s founding chairman and chief executive officer. The award is considered the highest honor a LifePoint employee can receive.

“At Maria Parham Health, we share LifePoint’s commitment to Making Communities Healthier, and we recognize this is supported by the good work and service of our employees on and off the job,” said Bert Beard, CEO of Maria Parham Health. “We are extremely proud to recognize Tammy Care for her efforts on behalf of our patients and our community. She goes above and beyond each and every day to ensure that every person she encounters receives the highest level of care and compassion.”

Tammy and her family moved to Henderson in 1999. She has been employed at Maria Parham Health for ten years and is an active member on many committees in the hospital including Sepsis, Infection Prevention, Emergency Management and Cardiac/Stroke Accreditation. Giving back to her community and volunteering for the betterment of others are two very important components to her lifestyle. Care prepares and serves meals the 2nd Sunday of every month to those in need, and every summer her and her husband take a week to work with middle and high school students on annual mission trips. Care is also active in many organizations in the community including the Henderson-Vance Chamber of Commerce, Llocal high school swim teams, and the local men’s shelter.

Each hospital winner, including Care, will be considered for LifePoint’s 2017 company-wide Mercy Award. The company-wide winner will be announced this summer and honored during a ceremony in Nashville, Tenn., in August, to which Care and all hospital winners are invited to attend.

Update: Water Situation in Henderson

PRESS RELEASE

FROM CITY MANAGER FRANK FRAZIER

CITY OF HENDERSON, NC

TUESDAY, JUNE 6, 2017

THE KERR LAKE REGIONAL WATER SYSTEM IS NOW PUMPING FINISHED WATER AT ITS NORMAL RATE.  MANDATORY WATER CONSERVATION HAS BEEN LIFTED; HOWEVER THE BOIL WATER ADVISORY FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION IS IN EFFECT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

BASED ON THE CONTINUAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PROBLEM IT APPEARS THAT THE CAUSE OF THE PUMP RUN FAILURE IS A MALFUNCTION OF THE SCADA (SUPERVISORY CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION) SYSTEM.

SCAM JAM Planned In Person County on June 14

Henderson – A recent survey shows that nearly all North Carolinians 50 years and older worry about being a victim of fraud. On June 14, the Kerr Tar Area Agency on Aging with the Person County Senior Center has scheduled a Scam Jam to help educate seniors to protect themselves from frauds and scams.

The Person County SCAM JAM is a free educational and entertaining forum where seniors will learn to avoid today’s scams and frauds, from identity theft to telemarketing and consumer and Medicare frauds.

Elder Abuse takes many forms and it is not always immediately apparent. In fact, many of the signs and symptoms of elder abuse mimic symptoms associated with aging, but should not be ignored. Failure to recognize and avoid fraud and exploitation can ruin one’s financial security. Financial abuse involves unauthorized use of an elderly person’s funds or property, either by a family member, caregiver, or an outside scam artist. Signs of financial abuse may include: significant withdrawals from accounts, missing cash or items from household, suspicious changes in wills, power of attorney, titles, and policies, unpaid bills or lack of medical care, although the elder has enough money to pay for them and unnecessary services, goods, subscriptions.

The SCAM JAM is designed to empower citizens to protect themselves and their families. Scheduled speakers include representatives from the Senior Medicare Patrol from the North Carolina Department of Insurance, North Carolina Attorney General’s Office, North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State as well as local Law Enforcement.

This free half day seminar will begin at 1:30 p.m. ending at 4:30 p.m. and will be held at the Person County Senior Center, 87 Semora Road, Roxboro.

The Kerr Tar Area Agency on Aging leads and is involved in the efforts that provide for the development and enhancement of comprehensive and coordinated community based systems of services, opportunities, and protections for older adults which assist them in leading independent, meaningful and dignified lives in their own homes and communities for as long as possible.

We serve five counties, Franklin, Granville, Person, Vance and Warren.

For more information about the Kerr Tar Area Agency on Aging, please call 252-436-2040.